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Messages - jeffy

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1726
The Pub / Today is Towel Day
« on: May 25, 2012, 04:36:06 AM »
http://towelday.org/
I forgot to bring my towel to work. :(

1727
Now that's just ridiculous for one guy to have to endure.

It's show biz...we work so you can have fun.  The nights and weekends you're partying, we're providing the party.
Now you've got me singing Jackson Browne "Stay Just a Little Bit Longer" for some reason.

1728
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Rookie Needs A Lil Help
« on: May 24, 2012, 12:53:59 PM »
Regardless, we all know that it's 99% likely this beer will taste nasty.  N-A-S-T-Y.  It's been sitting, souring, and doing who-knows-what for two weeks.  It certainly will not be what it was intended to be.
We don't know that at all!  We have no idea if it is contaminated or if anything is growing, if it has any off flavors, or if it is just sitting there.

No, it probably won't be exactly as intended.  KGS, you say lesson learned - I say there are MORE lessons to be learned. :)

Of course, we're here yammering away and arguing over it, and the OP hasn't even responded to anything. ::)
Yeah, I still say pitch some yeast.  Ain't skeered.
I wonder if the OP is still with us and reading all this...

1729
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Rookie Needs A Lil Help
« on: May 23, 2012, 04:25:58 AM »
I talked to an award winning homebrewer a couple years ago who stored unfermented wort for months, sometimes years before pitching yeast and fermenting.  He seemed to think it made the wort better, sorta like spaghetti sauce is better the next day......
As long as your vessel was sanitized, you should be fine repitching.

1730
I have a couple Blichmann conical fermenters and because it is warmer where I live I can only brew lagers for about 2 or 3 months in Dec, Jan and Feb.  I have looked at ways to cool them, but I have mostly contemplated external means of cooling (i.e. a large walk-in refrigerator, custom cooling jacket, those cooling chips) but they all involved a really large investment (walk in cooler) or seemed overly complex (custom cooling jacket).  And I'm not so sure the cooling chips would provide enough cooling.  I recently received a mail order homebrew catalog that had a stainless steel coil style wort chiller (most are copper) and that got me to thinking about using it to cool the fermenter internally.  If I could mount the chiller inside the fermenter, make a connection thru the top of the fermenter to an external supply of ice water in a large cooler, use a digital thermostat like the Ranco or Johnson, put the temperature probe into the fermenting beer and have the thermostat turn on a pump to pump ice water thru the wort chiller when it gets too warm it seems like a workable solution.  It never dawned on me until I saw the stainless wort chiller.  The only other issue is that I would have to somehow insulate the fermenter so that it wouldn't run constantly and use up a ton of ice, but this seems reasonable.  Does anyone have any experience doing something like this?  Any concerns?  Any ideas?  Thanks for any input you may have. 
Warm Regards,
Dave
It seems like it should work, but rather than changing ice water you could buy a small freezer and keep the cooling liquid inside that at the set temp.  I saw a small commercial brewery with this set-up, using glycol and a small pump to cool a ten bbl fermenter.

1731
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: is this normal?
« on: May 17, 2012, 02:23:54 PM »
Also if I fill my current tube any higher the beer will overflow and thus be about the same level as i currently use.
So when you have the tube full of, say, water, where does your hydrometer read?  Is it still reading zero?  If so and it reads less than that in the beer sample, then that's one very dry beer.

1732
We had a similarly stupid law in Florida up until 2001.  Beer could only be sold in 8, 12, 16, or 32 ounce containers (after that it was OK).  So we had almost no European beers and no 22 ounce bombers.
As I understand it the law was originally enacted in the late 50's to punish Miller for not putting their new brewery in Jacksonville, building it in Georgia instead.  They had 7 (or was it 7.5?) ounce bottles.

Nice that they fixed that...but didn't that create your ridiculous no-64oz-growlers law at the same time?
last I checked anything between 32 and 128 ounces was still illegal?

cheers--
--Michael

No, that is a left-over from the original stupid law.  At least we can get growler fills now, just not in the normal sizes that everybody else in the country has.  Pints are fine for me anyway.

1733
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: is this normal?
« on: May 17, 2012, 04:09:44 AM »
That's been almost three weeks.  At the low O.G. it was probably finished in the first few days, but giving it the extra time certainly didn't hurt. 
Some types of yeast leave a lot of stuff floating on the top.  It doesn't mean it is actively fermenting just because is hasn't fallen to the bottom.

1734
I have never understood why our elected officials have to be involved in bottle sizes. I can remember when 8oz. stubbies had to be approved by state government. How ridiculous is that?
I'll take a stab at why it might not be so ridiculous.  40s of malt liquor.

Okay, 1 large bottle, 8 stubbies, 4 regular size bottles, 3 pints. What difference does it make? It's still 40+ ounces of beer to be consumed.

Yes.  The container should make no difference, particularly when, as Major pointed out, you can buy larger containers of stronger stuff.

I never even would have thought that someone couldn't get a 750ml of Belgian beer...

We had a similarly stupid law in Florida up until 2001.  Beer could only be sold in 8, 12, 16, or 32 ounce containers (after that it was OK).  So we had almost no European beers and no 22 ounce bombers.
As I understand it the law was originally enacted in the late 50's to punish Miller for not putting their new brewery in Jacksonville, building it in Georgia instead.  They had 7 (or was it 7.5?) ounce bottles.

1735
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Utilization from spruce tips
« on: May 15, 2012, 02:47:23 PM »
LOL, Denny!

That was in a Koelsch no less!  It was tasty and spruce-y all the way to the end.  One thing to note is that the measurement of the spruce tips should be by weight, not volume, I believe.  Check with Devaris to confirm.  (He gave a great talk on this subject at the Homebrewers Conference in Las Vegas.)

Cheers,
   Janis

Wasn't that Geoff Larsen of Alaska Brewing?

1736
Kegging and Bottling / Re: New Carbonation Issues For Me
« on: May 14, 2012, 04:36:09 AM »
Simply stated, overcarbonation with no off flavors means there was too much sugar at bottling.  Possibly the residual sugar in underattenuated beer added the extra.  How long, at what temp and which yeast did you use to ferment?

1737
The Pub / Re: The Trash Thread
« on: May 13, 2012, 12:18:32 PM »
One man's bitter beer face
Is another man's IPA

1738
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Slight mess up, should I worry?
« on: May 13, 2012, 10:16:41 AM »
No, you should not worry.  I don't even bother with an air lock for the primary fermentations.  I just put some aluminum foil on top of the carboy.

1739
I am brewing a 10-gallon batch of IPA with Amarillo first wort hops and a whole pile of IBU's of Warrior at 20 minutes.

1740
Commercial Beer Reviews / S.A. Dark Depths
« on: May 12, 2012, 02:15:51 PM »
Here's an interesting concept from Sam Adams.  It says it's a Baltic IPA with Saaz, Zeus, Ahtanum and Simcoe, fermented with lager yeast and that it's 7.6 abv.
I'm enjoying it.  Perhaps too much roast malt flavors for the amount of American hops (see the thread on Cross Dressing Amateurs), but still it is nothing like I've ever tried before.
I like the fact that they're bottling strange things like this.  Next up is a bottle of Cinder Bock.

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