Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - anthony

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10] 11 12 ... 18
136
Going Pro / Re: German commercial breweries batch sparging?
« on: January 18, 2013, 12:23:50 PM »
Are these just gut feelings or do you have some data to support that?

I think Kai Troester's experiments and data support that.

137
Going Pro / Re: German commercial breweries batch sparging?
« on: January 18, 2013, 10:56:51 AM »
I don't think there is a huge efficiency hit. I think that is a myth. The only limitation is the size of the MT. My MT has a motorized paddle so stirring would not be an issue. On lower gravity beers it would be possible for us to batch sparge and I have thought about it to save time but haven't.

I think that all things being equal, if you simply change from continuous sparging to batch sparging, you will see an efficiency hit. That isn't to say you can't redial in the system to get the same or maybe even better efficiency than you were getting.

There is also no doubt in my mind that for the same amount of sparge water used, continuous sparging will yield a higher lauter efficiency than batch sparging. Again, that isn't to say you can't adjust to compensate though.

138
Going Pro / Re: German commercial breweries batch sparging?
« on: January 18, 2013, 07:56:28 AM »
Its certainly possible but the efficiency hit adds up depending on your system size. And again depending on your system and if you have rakes or not, I would think all that stirring might get old too.

139
Ingredients / Re: Coconut Extract
« on: January 15, 2013, 09:27:16 PM »
Make sure you spring for the actual coconut extract and not the imitation stuff. The imitation stuff makes your beer taste like sun tan lotion.

140
Going Pro / Re: Beer volume vs. Profit margin.
« on: January 14, 2013, 08:21:19 AM »
Yeah, I don't get out to the western slope often. I do have a friend that brews at a pub in Durango and in general it does sound like it has some catching up to do :)

Say what now? We have four breweries for 18,000 people, plus a fifth one opening this year and a sixth in planning. Per capita, that would be like the Denver metro area having 800 breweries.

Wasn't necessarily referring to the number of breweries there.  ;D

141
Going Pro / Re: Beer volume vs. Profit margin.
« on: January 13, 2013, 10:19:05 PM »
In some ways, I think Colorado has reached a point of super saturation where it is hard to draw parallels to other markets that are still developing. There are a few other places like this that come to mind as well.

You must not have gone to Grand Junction, because it's really nothing like anywhere else in CO (read: the front range).

Yeah, I don't get out to the western slope often. I do have a friend that brews at a pub in Durango and in general it does sound like it has some catching up to do :)

142
All Grain Brewing / Re: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews
« on: January 13, 2013, 10:15:18 PM »
I like to use MFB pale as my Belgian base malt. At times I think Pils distracts from what you're trying to do in those beers. The few breweries I've toured in Belgium and Germany all seemed to use a mix of pils/pale depending on the brewery. I remember munching on the grain at Ayinger and thinking that their base malt, which they described in typical German fashion as 'lager' malt, seemed much more subdued than typical Best or Weyermann Pils.

143
Going Pro / Re: Beer volume vs. Profit margin.
« on: January 13, 2013, 10:05:14 PM »
Sometimes they are destinations. Drydock in Aurora CO is a great example. Horrible location, but doing very well.

In my hometown (Grand Junction, CO) I've seen a few good breweries with bad locations do poorly, and some awful breweries with good locations do very well.

In some ways, I think Colorado has reached a point of super saturation where it is hard to draw parallels to other markets that are still developing. There are a few other places like this that come to mind as well.

I remember last Christmas taking my family to visit with my folks back in Loveland, my Dad and I decided we would do a 12 breweries of Christmas tour. We hit 15 breweries and we didn't travel further than 35 miles out of Loveland.

And there were a couple of breweries that without a taproom, I'm not sure they would be in business. There was one in particular in Loveland that was serving the most disgusting beer but folks were in line, filling up growlers, and enjoying the place. Another good example is Grimm Brothers, they are in an industrial park sort of setting, but the taproom always seems to be hopping.

Our tasting room is an integral part of our business plan. We are located far enough from downtown so that bars won't feel competitive pressure from our operation but close enough that people won't have to drive very far to visit us. Far enough that rent is cheaper, but close enough to use municipal transportation, etc.

144
Going Pro / Re: getting 30 bbls on line
« on: December 24, 2012, 12:28:44 PM »
And the fact that most breweries are pretty religiously repitching makes an experiment like the above, even more risky, all for saving what will probably amount to $20-40.

I don't really see how it's risky, since that technique was so common in German brewing that they made a name for it. Sure, $20-40 isn't much per batch, but if you're doing 100-200 batches a year, that adds up.

I guess for me, $2-4k isn't worth it. In a year, that is an insignificant amount of our total costs.

It may have well been common in German brewing but it isn't common in American brewing. And you can be sure that if the cost/benefit was there, the larger breweries like AB-Inbev would be all over it; think how much they could save.

Anyhow, that is the great thing about the brewing business and being the owner/brewer, you can roll whichever way you want :)

145
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Conflicting Info for Bottle Conditioning
« on: December 23, 2012, 08:20:40 PM »
One tip I took away from homebrew forums long ago: bottle one of your bottles into a plastic bottle. This will allow you to make sure the beer has at least carbonated (the bottle will be hard) before opening any of it.

If you are brewing a beer that takes more than the standard amount of carbonation, you can push the bottle in a little bit, put less beer into it so that it has to expand a bit more before it gets hard.

146
Going Pro / Re: getting 30 bbls on line
« on: December 23, 2012, 07:56:06 PM »
My WAG is that it won't really matter whether you pitch for the first step or the whole volume, as long as you're consistent the beer should also be consistent. It might be worth experimenting. If you can save money pitching less yeast and make the same quality of beer, why not? It might be an expensive experiment, though.

The big problem with stuff like this is that it is usually non-linear in nature. So someone's experiment to prove this has no effect on a 6 gallon batch might not scale to 7 or even 30 bbls. Same thing with gravity, it could be that a beer with a gravity below 12 plato shows no issues but beers above have problems or vice-versa.

Ultimately, on a professional scale, while the yeast pitch is the most expensive component of many batches, unlike the majority of the other inputs, that cost gets split into a fraction as you reuse the yeast in each further generation. And the fact that most breweries are pretty religiously repitching makes an experiment like the above, even more risky, all for saving what will probably amount to $20-40.

147
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Secondary fermentation
« on: December 19, 2012, 09:15:53 PM »
I am going to guess that you used the dry ale yeast option for this kit, which happens to be Danstar Windsor, so I doubt you're going to go much lower in gravity.

148
Going Pro / Re: getting 30 bbls on line
« on: December 18, 2012, 09:42:28 PM »
No, pitch for the desired density for the final volume of wort.

149
They own the production, though, not the distribution.  Owning so much of the production gives them a lot of weight with the distributors, I'm sure, but the distribution laws and three tier system are a whole different subject that has an impact on the retail availability of craft beers.

Not completely true. In Illinois for instance, AB owns a 30% stake in a holding company that has four licenses to distribute beer in Illinois. And there are several other instances of similar situations with bigger craft brewers as well. Windy City distribution was started by the Two Brothers owners and until a year or so ago was completely owned by them too (they recently changed the ownership to comply with changes to Illinois liquor law).

AB is increasingly and sometimes successfully arguing that if craft brewers, microbrewers, etc. can self-distribute, it should be able to self-distribute as well... of course they have to walk a fine line and not piss off all those distributorship lobbyists too.

150
Going Pro / Re: GREAT Surplus Auction of MC Brewing Equipment
« on: December 05, 2012, 09:17:21 PM »
This auction has been pretty heavily promoted on Probrewer, I'm sure most of this stuff is going to shoot up near the end of the auction.

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10] 11 12 ... 18