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Messages - fmader

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76
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Wedding beer names
« on: February 17, 2015, 04:30:19 PM »
We planned on typing up and printing a few beer menus for people to look over before they got to the bar. With my group, I'm betting the saison and ipa go first, followed by the kolsch. Stout and scottish are a bit of a wildcard.

My wife and I thought about a stout... especially since that's her favorite, but the wedding was outside and we just decided that it just wouldn't be refreshing. She drank wine, so all was right in the world lol.

77
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Wedding beer names
« on: February 17, 2015, 04:22:53 PM »
Here was my line up.... Nice choice on Hoppily Ever After  ;)



Also, I think I've mentioned this to you before. I'd type up a description of the beers and have available at the bar. This will help out less educated beer drinkers decide on a beer that won't be wasted. Everything that kicked.... Pale ale first, IPA second, golden ale, and then the cherry wheat. I would have thought the golden ale woulda went first and figured the IPA go last. But, the people who will drink the IPA will more than likely stick to the IPA and drink several of them.

78
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Extreme Weather Brewing
« on: February 16, 2015, 09:05:12 AM »
-6 when I fired up the mash water this morning. Good thing this beer has FWH and flameout hops during this 90 minute boil!

79
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: evap rate during boild sub zero temps
« on: February 14, 2015, 11:54:52 AM »
Move south man! You can ride year round down here... Except for those few weeks in August  when the asphalt melts. Brewed today in lovely 70 degree weather!

You had me right up until "when the asphalt melts"! 

Yoopers don't "do" hot weather but I'm not crazy about the cold either.

One thing I've found is that I do boil off a lot more in the winter where I live.  However, we are in a fairly dry climate.  In the winter, the inside of my house reads 20% humidity on my hygrometer.  I boil off 2 gallons/hour then, while in the summer it's more like 1.25 gallons/hour,

Yeah, there's not enough baby powder on this planet to get me to move to the south lol

80
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: evap rate during boild sub zero temps
« on: February 14, 2015, 11:41:37 AM »
I don't think ambient temperatures would have any effect. 212 is 212. Ambient pressure would have more of an effect I would think. But then that might just have effect on boiling point.

It sure looks like it's blowing off more steam in the cold, but I think it's just more visible when it's -5 degrees than when it's 95 degrees. What's more mind boggling is how one location can have those same temperatures only several months a part lol.

81
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing This Weekend? 2/13/15
« on: February 14, 2015, 06:45:58 AM »
Was planning to brew Subday, but I'll be pushing that back to Monday due to polar vortex lol. I'll be brewing a session IPA with an OG of 1.047, 80% Pilsner malt and 20% Munich malt. I'll be doing a 90 minute boil and will hop with a 2:1 ratio of Azzaca and Mosiac with 1 oz total at first wort, 5 oz total at flameout, and 5 oz total to dry hop. I'll be fermenting with WLP 001. Nothing fancy, but this will be my first session IPA.

My plan to push back the brew day might have back fired... Gonna kick Monday's brew day off at -10 degrees. The torpedo heater will be utilized in full force!

Yeah, the weather has turned brutal.  Arse freezing cold. I would normally say enjoy the brewday, but maybe 'protect the extremities' is a little better. Weather like that demands a hot scotchy.  ;)

Thanks for the reminder. I used the last of the scotch last brew... It was about 4 degrees that day too. Off to the liquor store!

82
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing This Weekend? 2/13/15
« on: February 13, 2015, 08:24:48 PM »
Was planning to brew Subday, but I'll be pushing that back to Monday due to polar vortex lol. I'll be brewing a session IPA with an OG of 1.047, 80% Pilsner malt and 20% Munich malt. I'll be doing a 90 minute boil and will hop with a 2:1 ratio of Azzaca and Mosiac with 1 oz total at first wort, 5 oz total at flameout, and 5 oz total to dry hop. I'll be fermenting with WLP 001. Nothing fancy, but this will be my first session IPA.

My plan to push back the brew day might have back fired... Gonna kick Monday's brew day off at -10 degrees. The torpedo heater will be utilized in full force!

83
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing This Weekend? 2/13/15
« on: February 13, 2015, 09:03:16 AM »
Was planning to brew Subday, but I'll be pushing that back to Monday due to polar vortex lol. I'll be brewing a session IPA with an OG of 1.047, 80% Pilsner malt and 20% Munich malt. I'll be doing a 90 minute boil and will hop with a 2:1 ratio of Azzaca and Mosiac with 1 oz total at first wort, 5 oz total at flameout, and 5 oz total to dry hop. I'll be fermenting with WLP 001. Nothing fancy, but this will be my first session IPA.

84
Ingredients / Re: Hop Retailers
« on: February 11, 2015, 02:47:24 PM »
I've been happy with Hops Shack in OH, good quality and great prices and good variety. They also ship quick.

I like Hops Shack. Their prices are tough to beat. They also have a moving sale going on now. I also use Label Peelers. Get on their mailing list, because they run 25% off the entire store sales. I just got my first order of Yakima Valley hops a few weeks ago. I haven't used them but they were packaged nicely and shipped rather quickly considering Oregon and Ohio aren't necessarly neighbors.

85
Ingredients / Re: Pellet vs. Leaf Hops
« on: February 10, 2015, 07:33:00 PM »
Yeah, I'd need an appliance department in the garage if all my pellets in the freezer were leaf.    ;D

I know that looks like a lot, sir, but it's just really light.

Yeah, 20 lbs of dried leaf hops would probably fill a 10 cubic foot freezer lol

86
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: looking to brew something different
« on: February 10, 2015, 04:48:29 PM »
Maybe an imperial red IPA... Along the lines of a GL Nosferatu.

87
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing today
« on: February 09, 2015, 08:48:32 AM »
I see that you keep a paper-based log, which is a dying art.  That practice will pay off in spades in the years to come.  I have logs that date back to the early nineties.  I still keep a paper-based log.

Me too.  I'm on my third book of handwritten notes.

Absolutely!

88
Beer Recipes / Re: Next up...
« on: February 09, 2015, 08:40:23 AM »
I hand calculate my recipes. I use points but my formula is different. I do batch points the same. Final volume x gravity points. But that's where it ends. I determine the percentages of each grain in the bill. Let's say 80% two row. We'll just use your example. 80% x 375 = 300. Now I need to know the potential extract of the malt. With two row, it's 38. And I need to know the brewhouse efficiency. In my case, it's 75%. So, I divide my points by potential extract x brewhouse efficiency.

300/(38x.75) = 10.53

So, This recipes calls for 10.5 lbs of two row. I'll do the same process for the rest of the malts.

This method is from Daniels "Designing Great Beers"

It's simple and works for me. It's pretty automatic for me at this point.

I guess we'll both be drinking with the zombies

I hand calculate my recipes. I use points but my formula is different. I do batch points the same. Final volume x gravity points. But that's where it ends. I determine the percentages of each grain in the bill. Let's say 80% two row. We'll just use your example. 80% x 375 = 300. Now I need to know the potential extract of the malt. With two row, it's 38. And I need to know the brewhouse efficiency. In my case, it's 75%. So, I divide my points by potential extract x brewhouse efficiency.

300/(38x.75) = 10.53

So, This recipes calls for 10.5 lbs of two row. I'll do the same process for the rest of the malts.

This method is from Daniels "Designing Great Beers"

It's simple and works for me. It's pretty automatic for me at this point.

I guess we'll both be drinking with the zombies

The Daniels method is basically extraction efficiency applied by hand.  I too used to calculate extraction efficiency as a percentage, but realized that doing so was a waste of time.  The beauty of using points per pound per gallon (PPG) as one’s brew house extraction metric is that it demonstrates that calculating brew house efficiency a percentage is a completely unnecessary step.

In practice, extraction efficiencies do not tell us anything more than batch-to-batch extraction rates in PPG, and they are much more complicated and error prone than PPG extraction rates.  I guarantee that the stock maximum yield for any given malt that is encoded in any given software package does not match that of a bag of real world malt.  Real world malt yields higher and lower maximum values than the stock values that are encoded in any given brewing software package.  There are many reasons for this delta such as year-to-year variations in the crop, malting-to-malting variations in the malt, and water absorption during transit and storage.  Extraction efficiencies that do not take into these variations in Dry Basis, Fine Grind (DBFG) and/or Hot Water Extract (HWE) are little more than works of fiction. 

How many brewers have experienced a noticeable bump in efficiency with particular bags of base malt from a maltster or base malt from a different maltster?  That bump is not a sign that one's brew house has magically become more efficient.  It's a sign that the software does not take into account the higher maximum yield for the actual malt used in a recipe.  Commercial brewers generally have access to the malt analysis sheets for any given batch of malt (yes, the maximum yield for any given malt can change from batch to batch).  Macro and larger regional brewers have in-house quality laboratories that have the equipment and staff necessary to analyze every ingredient that they use on the day of use.  Home brewers have access to analysis sheets that contain overall averages.  Using extraction efficiencies that are based on theoretical maximum yield values is the grist equivalent of using yearly averages from a mixed-source public utility when performing adjustments to brewing liquor chemistry.  So why are home brewers using a brew house metric that is really only accurate in a commercial setting?

Good stuff here, Mark. I'll definetely be looking into this more. Thank you!

89
Beer Recipes / Re: Next up...
« on: February 08, 2015, 07:50:23 PM »
flbrewer, if it helps, you can bypass efficiency percentages and work directly in points per pound per gallon.  I prefer to use extraction rates in points per pound per gallon because it is a directly applicable value.  Extraction efficiency is an indirect value that requires an additional weighted computation to be performed.

total_gravity_points = 6.25 * 60 (1.060 in gravity points) = 375

points_per_pound_per_gallon = total_gravity_points / grist_weight

points_per_pound_per_gallon = 375 / 16 = 23.44

What this value means in layman's terms is that the original recipe was formulated to achieve an extraction rate of 23.44 gravity points per pound of grain, that is, the extract from one pound grain dissolved in a one gallon solution has a specific gravity of 1.02344  That's a value that can be easily applied in one brew house. Working the other way yields:

original_gravity = points_per_pound_per_gallon * grist_weight / batch_volume / 1000  + 1.0

original_gravity = 23.44 * 16 / 6.25 / 1000 + 1.0 = 1.060

The way to determine one's brew house extraction rate in points per pound per gallon is to simply track the original gravity and total final boil volume minus the break and hops for each batch.  For each batch in the sample, calculate a batch extraction rate using the following formula:

batch_extraction_rate = original_gravity_in_points * batch_total_volume / grist_weight

I calculate this value when I take my original gravity reading.  After a few batches have been brewed, it's time to calculate an average batch extraction by summing the batch extraction rates and dividing by the number of batch extraction rates.

Batch Extraction Rates

Batch #1 - 28 points per pound per gallon
Batch #2 - 27 points per pound per gallon
Batch #3 - 29 points per pound per gallon
Batch #4 - 30 points per pound per gallon
Batch #5 - 29 points per pound per gallon

average_batch_extraction_rate = 28 + 27 + 29 + 30 + 29 / 5 = 28.6

Now, we can convert the recipe to our brew house by calculating a grist scaling factor.  Our extraction rate is higher than the original extraction rate; therefore, this value will be less than one.

grist_scaling_factor = 23.44 / 28.6 = 0.82

All we need to do from this point forward is to multiply every quantity in the grist by 0.88 to scale the grist to our brew house.  We do not need to adjust the hop bill because the bitterness unit to gravity unit ratio will remain the same.

While what I just wrote seems like a lot of work, what you will find over time is that these calculations become automatic, and you will no longer have to compute an average batch extraction rate because your extraction rates will converge within a close enough range that you can ball park it without actually performing the calculation.  When that happens, you will be able to look at a recipe for 6.25 gallons 1.060 wort, and think I need to use 60 / 28.6 = 2.1 pounds of malt per gallon to hit that gravity.  At that point, you will prefer to look at recipes as percentages, which is the way that professional brewers state recipes.  For example, we are making a bigger version of SNPA, which is often quoted as having a grist that is 95% 2-Row and 5% C60.

total_grist_weight = 2.1 * 6.25 = 13.125 pounds

pounds_of_2Row = 13.125 * 0.95 = ~12.5
pounds_of_C60 = 13.125 * 0.05 = ~0.65

As you have more than likely already ascertained, the values add up to more than 13.125 pounds.  I rounded to make measuring a little easier.

With the above said, why should anyone learn how to perform these calculations when brewing software will shield one from having to learn this information?  Well, learning how to brew using brewing software is not the same thing as learning how to brew.  Learning how to brew means mastering all of the brewing fundamentals that are encapsulated in brewing software.

I hand calculate my recipes. I use points but my formula is different. I do batch points the same. Final volume x gravity points. But that's where it ends. I determine the percentages of each grain in the bill. Let's say 80% two row. We'll just use your example. 80% x 375 = 300. Now I need to know the potential extract of the malt. With two row, it's 38. And I need to know the brewhouse efficiency. In my case, it's 75%. So, I divide my points by potential extract x brewhouse efficiency.

300/(38x.75) = 10.53

So, This recipes calls for 10.5 lbs of two row. I'll do the same process for the rest of the malts.

This method is from Daniels "Designing Great Beers"

It's simple and works for me. It's pretty automatic for me at this point.

I guess we'll both be drinking with the zombies

90
Beer Recipes / Re: Slobber Knocker IIPA
« on: February 08, 2015, 06:58:59 PM »
I racked this Friday after three weeks in the primary onto the 8 oz of dry hops. I hit a record in dryness in any pale beer that I've brewed. The gravity is at a dangerously drinkable 1.007. Since I overshot my volume, I'm sitting at 8.777% ABV.

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