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Messages - fmader

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91
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing today
« on: February 08, 2015, 04:44:01 PM »

I like the idea of an ABish clone. I might have to put this in the line up. It's at least four brews down the road though.

When you do, this is the CYBI Arrogant Bastard recipe that everybody but Tasty declared cloned. It's good, but the one change I've made is to bump the Chinook additions from 24g to 1 oz (28g). I think this makes it closer to the fresh AB I had @ Stone. Really simple, good recipe.

http://blog.ericshepard.com/2011/04/arrogant-bastard.html

I like the way you think. Looks simple enough. I'd have to debate with myself to add a couple oz to dry hop lol

92
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing today
« on: February 08, 2015, 04:16:34 PM »
I wear flip flops on most brew days. I know it's dumb, but I do it anyhow. Oh, it's also low 70's and the windows are open in North Texas.

I wear boots and trudge through 6 inches of snow lol. Heat wave today in NE Ohio. It got up to 49. But no fear, all this melt off will freeze when it tanks to 17 tomorrow.

I like the idea of an ABish clone. I might have to put this in the line up. It's at least four brews down the road though.

93
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing today
« on: February 08, 2015, 02:57:16 PM »
I'm just pissed off that your climate allows you to be wearing flip flops and to have your windows open in February!

Careful in flip flops though... Don't want to burn the toes with hot liquids or trip and drop 5 gallons of your finished wort.

94

You could try coffee. Or there's always the option to leave it be and not add anything.
Doing this today with an American stout. Lots of ways to do it too. Whole beans in the fermenter, course cracked beans, cold brewed.

I just made some cold brew last night. 1/2 pound of local espresso beans + 40 ounces of water = 25 ounces of very concentrated coffee perfect for 5 gallons IMO.

Oh... I guess I didn't mention my method. When I do my breakfast stout, I add two ounces of ground coffee at flameout. Then I add another two ounces of ground coffee to the secondary. I use a dark roast of sorts. Usually it's Sumatra.

95
You could try coffee. Or there's always the option to leave it be and not add anything.

96
All Grain Brewing / Re: Strike Temp.
« on: February 08, 2015, 12:26:28 PM »
I'm puzzled that one of the guys  posting above said he needs to go 16 F above to get to the mash temp. Is this because you are adding water slowly into your mash tun?

No, it's because we are raising the temperature of the grain and the tun to mash temperature with the hot liquor infusion, and the hot liquor infusion has to carry this additional heat energy into the tun. This problem is an exercise in applied thermodynamics.  Let's examine the equation that I posted.

strike_liquor_temperature = (0.2 / hot_liquor_to_grist_ratio_in_quarts_per_pound) x (desired_strike_temperature - grist_temperature) + desired_strike_temperature

There's a concept in thermodynamics known as specific heat capacity.  Specific heat capacity is the ratio of the amount of heat energy added to an object to the rise in temperature resulting from the addition of the heat energy.   Twenty pounds of grain has the same amount of heat capacity as 1 gallon of water, that is, the amount of heat energy necessary to raise the temperature of a gallon of water 1 degree is equal to the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of 20 pounds of grain 1 degree.

The value 0.2 in the equation shown above represents the specific heat waiting factor for a pound of grain with respect to a quart of water.  If 20 pounds of grain has the same specific heat capacity as a gallon of water, then 1 pound of grain has the specific heat capacity of 1/20th of a gallon of water, which equals 0.05 in decimal.  As there are four quarts in a gallon, we have to multiply this value by 4 to convert it to specific heat capacity with respect to a quart of water, which equals 0.05 * 4 = 0.2.

Now, because we generally mash with a grist ratio of one than one quart per pound of grain, we need to further scale the grain-weighting factor.  We perform this step by dividing 0.2 by the number of quarts per pound that we use during mash-in (i.e., hot_liquor_to_grist_ratio_in_quarts_per_pound in the equation shown above).

In the next part of the equation, we calculate the difference between the strike temperature (our rest temperature) and the grist temperature. The subexpression "(desired_strike_temperature - grist_temperature)" accomplishes that goal. 

Now, we need to covert the temperature difference that we just converted to specific heat in quarts because one pound of grain only has as much specific heat capacity as 1/5th of a quart of water.  That's where the weighting factor that we previously calculated comes into play.  In the example that I gave earlier in the thread, the temperature difference between the grist before mash-in was 77F.  The desired strike temperature was 151F, resulting in a temperature differential of 74 degrees Fahrenheit.  We are using 1.5 quarts per pound; therefore, the weighting factor 0.2 gets reduced to  0.13.

strike_liquor_temperature = (0.2 / 1.5) * (151 - 77) + 151 =  0.13  *  74 + 151 =  161F (72C)

Hopefully, I have not lost the members of the forum at this point.  The subexpression "0.13 * 74" shown in the equation above represents the amount of heat necessary to raise the temperature of the grist to 151F.  Every quart of water that we infuse must carry the heat energy necessary to raise a quart of water 10 degrees above the strike temperature because that heat energy will be absorbed by the grist, resulting in the grist temperature rising to 151F.

The next part of the problem is the most difficult to approximate, which is why it is best arrived at empirically.  The tun itself has a specific heat capacity, and it is not sitting at strike temperature when we mash-in; hence, we have to add additional heat energy to cover this thermal loss.  Whereas the amount of heat energy necessary to raise a pound of grain X number of degrees given V volume of strike liquor to a given strike temperature remains linear as long as the ratio of quarts to pounds remains the same, the amount of heat energy required to raise the tun to strike temperature remains static because the tun's mass does not change with respect to mash size.  In effect, the amount of additional heat energy per quart necessary to raise the tun to strike temperature decreases as the volume of the mash increases.

This^^^

I wasn't and still not this scientific when determining my strike temp. It was a trial on error type a deal when I first started my system. It only took a few brews to dial it in close enough. There are several determining factors for me. 18 degrees over was the original baseline. This is usually was when I was mashing at about 1.5 qts/lb. However, I mash much thinner than that now. A lot of the times I'm mashing at 2 qts/lb. I do gravity feed my mash water. This transfer does take about 5 minutes or so. Also, the time of the year plays a factor. I'll keep my tun inside at room temp before I'm ready to mash, but my grain is stored in the basement. Basement temps can get down to 50 degrees in the winter. So, in the winter, my strikes have to be a touch higher to hit my desired target. I also rather be a degree or two high on my target mash temp instead of being a degree or two low. It's much easier to stir for a few minutes or add a few ice cubes to the mix instead of adding a 1/2 gallon or so of boiling water. A lot of my brewing calculations are done by feel and experience. It's what works for me, and I make good beer  ;D.

97
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: B. E. A. UTIFUL day for a brew day!
« on: February 08, 2015, 11:00:34 AM »
Very nice setup!  I've gotten noticeably better extraction with Avangard pils, so I'm curious to see how you end up. Great February weather.

Same here.

It's pushing 50 here. I wish I would have brewed this weekend. It will probably be 4 degrees next time I brew lol.

98
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Trappistes Rochefort 10
« on: February 08, 2015, 04:05:36 AM »
Herman Holtrop clone of the Rochefort 8 is worth brewing.  So If you bump up the gravity
of the 8, you may be able to get very close???
It was the base beer for my wonderful  sour cherry solera.

I just kegged a quad. I used Denny's recipe as a baseline with a few small alterations to the malt bill. I caremalized 5 oz each raisins, dried sweet cherries, dates, and prunes and added to the secondary. It's going to age in the keg for a year. The hydrometer sample was awesome. I'll let you know how it tastes in about a year. I won't be brewing another until I at least taste this one.

99
Commercial Beer Reviews / Trappistes Rochefort 10
« on: February 07, 2015, 08:42:55 PM »
Absolutely amazing!..... That is all

100
Hop Growing / Re: 2015 Hop season
« on: February 07, 2015, 08:12:47 AM »
I wouldn't sweat any early shooters a whole lot. Even if it frosts, they'll die and be replaced by others.

101
All Grain Brewing / Re: Strike Temp.
« on: February 07, 2015, 07:23:14 AM »
Each system is different. It also depends on how you transfer the water. On average, my strike temp is 16 degrees over my target mash. If my mash is thinner, I'll drop the strike a couple degrees. If it's thicker, I might raise it. I think it's just something that you get a feel for.

102
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Sierra Nevada HopHunter
« on: February 06, 2015, 06:17:55 PM »
Checked 3 liquor stores on the way home - none in Indy yet according to the owners. Dammit. Sounds like maybe next weekend. Anybody else find it yet (except for fmader) ?

I've looked at six places to find it packaged today. No dice. It's odd that this little bar has it. They have a few craft beers on tap (one always a Great Lakes) at a time but they're not known for it. It was a good evening there. Hop Hunter was used to wash down a couple black pearl long boned pork chops.... Also a rare special.

103
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Sierra Nevada HopHunter
« on: February 05, 2015, 07:11:47 PM »
I wonder though what the difference is between this method and the CO2 extraction method.

It sounds essentially like steam distillation, something that's common in chemistry labs. I'm surprised that there's much of a difference, and I would have expected the CO2 extract to be more aromatic. By doing the steam there's two big differences: the solvent, of course, is water, not CO2. There will be some difference in the nature and ratios of compounds extracted. However, the bigger deal will be temperature. The steam extract will be done at a much higher temperature. Normally in flavor extracts this extra heat is a detriment to the quality of the extract. I wonder in this instance, since hops are boiled during brewing, if the steam extract more closely approximates what happens when making a wet hop beer. Before retiring I was an analytical chemist and worked with both CO2 and steam distillation, so I'm hoping that something on the technical side gets published. Whatever happens, I will be looking for the beer!

It is steam distillation. SN explains it briefly on their website. This beer isn't done exclusively with the extracted oils. It is still hopped with bitter and flavor hops.

104
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Sierra Nevada HopHunter
« on: February 05, 2015, 06:37:23 PM »
BOOM! I just had it on tap! Very fresh. Very clean. Very hoppy. Very good. I wish I didn't have to leave the bar.

Awesome !  Is the hop aroma good ?  Can't wait to find it.

They went thinner with the body. I like it, but a little diffetentiated compared to other SN brews. The aroma is there but not out of this world. The flavor is more of the point of emphasis. It's a solid beer and very drinkable in the 6.5 range. I gave it 4.5 on Untappd. This is a very high rating for me. I only have 4, maybe 5 five star ratings.

105
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Sierra Nevada HopHunter
« on: February 05, 2015, 06:17:39 PM »
BOOM! I just had it on tap! Very fresh. Very clean. Very hoppy. Very good. I wish I didn't have to leave the bar.

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