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Messages - dzlater

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2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Stuck Airlock
« on: January 09, 2016, 04:05:17 PM »
Why don't you just leave it till after you bottle/keg the beer?
I sometimes just stick a cotton ball in the airlock to act as a filter.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mistakes, Learned From
« on: January 02, 2016, 08:51:16 AM »
A minor mishap. I just bought one of those paint stirrers you put on a drill to aerate my wort.
It worked well but fell off the drill into the fermentor. I just left it in there to ferment along with the beer.

4
I've had success using an overnight soak of Mark's (S. cerevisiae) solution of 1 oz bleach and 1 oz vinegar in 5 gallons of water. Works like a charm. Be careful to add the bleach and vinegar (separately) to the water.
I wonder if this will get the pickle smell out of a Firehouse Subs pickle bucket?  Firehouse sell the empty buckets for $2 or $3.  I was going to buy a couple to store grain in.  But I think I'm better off with a Homer bucket from Home Depot.

I get empty frosting buckets for free from the bakery at the grocery store.

5
Beer Recipes / Recipe says "cold steep for 2 hours"?
« on: November 14, 2015, 06:26:03 AM »
I want to brew this recipe
http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/InvisibleKittySessionRyeStout

In the directions it says this:

Cold steep dark grains in 8 liters of room temp water for 2 hours during setup, mash, and lauter
Mash in the rest of the grain with 27 liters water at 75*C for a target mash temp of 69*C.
Hold for 45 minutes.
Sparge with 20L at 93*C.


I have a few questions

What I have read says when you cold steep it is done for 24 hours, not 2?
I have also read there is no need to cold steep the carafa II since it is already debittered?

If I do cold steep at what point would I add it to the boil? The recipe doesn't say.

6
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: New starter procedure trial
« on: October 19, 2015, 03:13:18 AM »
1 quart, 100 grams DME, gallon jug, og of beer was 1.045.
I didn't use any pitching rate calculator.

What is your beers target gravity?

I guess somewhere between 1.013 and 1.010?         

Sorry - what is your beers starting target gravity?

7
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: New starter procedure trial
« on: October 18, 2015, 03:48:59 PM »

         
==
You are a better man than me.  I want to use domestic malt, but I cannot stand Briess malt.  Rahr was better than Briess, but it was also too bland for me.
[/quote]

   Actually I have no idea what brand malt I used. The home brew store doesn't label the grain bins with the malting company and I forgot to ask. The "Briess in the recipe is just what came up in Beersmith.
I don't have a lot of experiance with the differances between various maltsters.  I'm not sure I could tell the differance unless I had the same recipe side by side.
I never brewed a recipe with say Briess malt and then brewed again using a different brand so I could compare them.
    And that was a quart starter maybe a bit more. I added maybe an extra cup or so to account for boil off maybe it didn't boil off as much as I thought,


8
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: New starter procedure trial
« on: October 18, 2015, 01:26:07 PM »
1 quart, 100 grams DME, gallon jug, og of beer was 1.045.
I didn't use any pitching rate calculator.

What is your beers target gravity?

I guess somewhere between 1.013 and 1.010?
The yeast website says "Attenuation 69-74%"
I mashed at 154.
Pitched yeast at 68.
And put in a 66 water bath.
Here is the whole recipe

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 7.24 gal
Post Boil Volume: 6.24 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 6.00 gal   
Bottling Volume: 6.00 gal
Estimated OG: 1.044 SG
Estimated Color: 10.6 SRM
Estimated IBU: 21.3 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 95.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 95.0 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amt                   Name                                     Type          #        %/IBU         
7 lbs                 Vienna Malt (Briess) (3.5 SRM)           Grain         1        88.9 %       
8.0 oz                Carapils (Briess) (1.5 SRM)              Grain         2        6.3 %         
4.0 oz                Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L (40.0 SRM)    Grain         3        3.2 %         
2.0 oz                Roasted Barley (Simpsons) (550.0 SRM)    Grain         4        1.6 %         
0.5 oz                Target [11.00 %] - Boil 40.0 min         Hop           5        17.2 IBUs     
1.0 oz                East Kent Goldings (EKG) [5.00 %] - Boil Hop           6        4.1 IBUs     
1.0 pkg               Irish Ale Yeast (White Labs #WLP004)     Yeast         7        -             







9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: New starter procedure trial
« on: October 18, 2015, 10:15:11 AM »
1 quart, 100 grams DME, gallon jug, og of beer was 1.045.
I didn't use any pitching rate calculator.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: New starter procedure trial
« on: October 18, 2015, 09:56:11 AM »
Gave this a try today with a two month old pure pitch pouch of White Labs Irish Ale yeast. I made the starter last night at 9:00 pm pitched into the fermenter today at 12:00 noon. One thing to rember if you are going to do this is to leave some extra room in the fermenter for the starter, I think I'm going to need a blowoff tube.

This is the starter when I pitched the yeast.


This is the starter before pitching.


Here is the fermenter.



11
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« on: October 16, 2015, 03:39:21 AM »
.............. If using dry Bry 97, it is important to pitch at least 1 gram per liter (i.e., two packages in a 5-gallon batch).

I usde this yeast quite often and am wondering why two packets?

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The way you use your yeast...
« on: September 25, 2015, 02:05:01 PM »
  Reading about the "shaken not stirred" method made me recall this.
When I first started using liquid yeast, I made  a quart starter in a gallon jug in the morning before I started brewing.  No stir plate I would just give it a real good shake every chance I had.
  If I remember right it was an Irish Red probably around 1.050.That beer was the fastest starting most vigorous ferment I have ever had. I remember looking at about an hour or so after I pitched and the airlock was already bubbling.
     Then I read about cell counts and stir plates and pitcing rate calculators.
And even though it worked well for me,I started to do things the "right" way.
 At the time I didn't have the confidance in my brewing to trust my own methods.

13
I would probably let the brewery know, but
I would take them back to the store and get a refund.

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: British Ale Yeasts
« on: August 31, 2015, 02:39:33 PM »
London Ale III, which I believe is the Boddington's strain, is a fairly neutral English yeast if you're out to avoid too much yeast flavor. If you decide to get off the English ale kick you can keep using that yeast to brew those Vermont-style IPA/APAs.
When I use liquid yeast London Ale III is my go to.




15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Getting Smegma out of Better Bottles
« on: August 30, 2015, 08:39:49 AM »
As always make sure to rinse well.
And try and avoid the scented ones.

I'll add a bit of powdered dishwasher detergant to the oxyclean soak, it seems to help.

I'll try it -- thanks.

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