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Messages - Wort-H.O.G.

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346
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 10:04:49 AM »
Also, does anyone have any suggestions for my mash time and temperature? Thanks!

what yeast are you using by the way?

I'm using Wyeast American Ale II 1272

anybody know if this yeast has issues getting 80%+ AA?

347
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 09:51:32 AM »
A few things to tweak.  I definitely wouldn't use almost 10% crystal in an extract IPA. I'd cut it back to 7% , and would sub out a lb of Vienna for a lb of sugar. Extract beers tend to not be as fermentable as all grain beers, so the sugar will help offset this and give you a drier, less sweet finish. Also, I would add 2 oz of Centennial at 10, 5, and 0 minutes, to get IPA level flavor.  Next, consider adding a tsp of gypsum to the boil, to bring out the hop character. One more thing -  I would also bump the dry hops up to a more IPA-ish 3+ oz for 7 days. Not trying to be overly critical - this will just be a lot more like Two Hearted. Good luck !

You're not being over critical at all. I really appreciate the feed back. Like I said, I wanna learn how to create my own recipes and advice like this really helps! I have a few follow up questions:

1) Can I just use cane sugar, or is there another you would recommend? Also, do I just put the sugar in the grain sac when I'm steeping, or do I throw it in with the extract during boil?
2) Would the 2 oz of hops at 10, 5 and 0 be in addition to the 20 minute?
3) When do I add the gypsum? I've never used salts before.

Thanks again for the help!

1/  Cane is fine, in the boil.

2/  Yep, in addition.  Your recipe initially would've been fine for a pale ale, now looks more like an IPA.

3/ Add the gypsum in the boil.

Cool! With your changes, I now have this:

OG: 1.075
FG: 1.019
ABV: 7.3%
IBU: 88

I feel like that IBU rating might be a little high. If I take out the 5 minute addition it goes down to 75, which is more where I'd like it.

FWIW you may want to bring down the OG. 1.064 may get you better results and in line with the actual beer.

348
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 09:47:32 AM »
Also, does anyone have any suggestions for my mash time and temperature? Thanks!


I'd go 60 min at 149-150.

+1

what FG are you assuming for him?

349
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 09:41:28 AM »
Also, does anyone have any suggestions for my mash time and temperature? Thanks!

what yeast are you using by the way?

350
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What kind of beer would these make
« on: February 25, 2015, 09:20:31 AM »
I tried fermenting a beer with a probiotic with a similar mix. It didn't turn out well. Not sour. It didn't taste like anything. Even the grain flavors disappeared.

did it ferment out on its own or not?

351
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What kind of beer would these make
« on: February 25, 2015, 07:50:39 AM »
I doubt it will kill you - If I'm wrong, well, sorry. ;) Remember that wines and ciders have been produced by wild fermentations for centuries. Many problematic organisms are killed off by even a small percentage of alcohol. Many of the bugs in that probiotic may not be alcohol tolerant. I wouldn't add a commercial yeast either just because I'd worry it would overwhelm your bugs. I would monitor pH, if you can, and I would smell it before tasting.

yeah i'm just going to throw some in a gallon and see what happens on its own. if it doesn't work, i will try another started with some dry yeast and then add the capsules.

352
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 07:38:30 AM »
there really is an art to making a 7%abv beer drink like a 5%abv beer. Ive done it with by Belgian Blonde at 7.2%abv. you can knock back a few pints without any indication of the higher ABV...and then it catches up with you! my 76 year old mother loves my BB, and the first time she had a pint and was snockered! she goes easy on it now  ;D

353
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 07:31:30 AM »
I've always thought bells had a very unique flavor. i assumed it must be partially from the yeast....is it really perhaps all the centennial?? I wouldn't have thought so since I've used centennial, just not all on its own.

From what I've read, it is partially their yeast. Bell's has a signature yeast they use, which can be harvested. I would do that for my beer to really give it the Bell's flavor, but I wanna brew on Sunday and won't have time for the harvest.

From their website:   "Bell's Two Hearted Ale is defined by its intense hop aroma and malt balance. Hopped exclusively with the Centennial hop varietal from the Pacific Northwest, massive additions in the kettle and again in the fermenter lend their characteristic grapefruit and pine resin aromas. A significant malt body balances this hop presence; together with the signature fruity aromas of Bell's house yeast, this leads to a remarkably drinkable American-style India Pale Ale."

fruity aroma really makes me think either a different yeast or fermented warmer.

I think WY 1272 / WLP051 would be a good choice here.

+1

354
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 07:24:53 AM »
I've always thought bells had a very unique flavor. i assumed it must be partially from the yeast....is it really perhaps all the centennial?? I wouldn't have thought so since I've used centennial, just not all on its own.

From what I've read, it is partially their yeast. Bell's has a signature yeast they use, which can be harvested. I would do that for my beer to really give it the Bell's flavor, but I wanna brew on Sunday and won't have time for the harvest.

From their website:   "Bell's Two Hearted Ale is defined by its intense hop aroma and malt balance. Hopped exclusively with the Centennial hop varietal from the Pacific Northwest, massive additions in the kettle and again in the fermenter lend their characteristic grapefruit and pine resin aromas. A significant malt body balances this hop presence; together with the signature fruity aromas of Bell's house yeast, this leads to a remarkably drinkable American-style India Pale Ale."

fruity aroma really makes me think either a different yeast or fermented warmer.

355
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 07:21:35 AM »
Well, their yeast isn't quite as clean as Chico, so there could be a little yeast character there. But it's an all Centennial beer, unlike other IPAs with blended hops.

yeah just thinking out loud. i really do like BTHA; great taste and smell, very smooth and easy drinking. I may have to try the all centennial route and see if that's it or not.

356
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Two Hearted Clone
« on: February 25, 2015, 06:43:56 AM »
I've always thought bells had a very unique flavor. i assumed it must be partially from the yeast....is it really perhaps all the centennial?? I wouldn't have thought so since I've used centennial, just not all on its own.

357
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Is This Infected?
« on: February 24, 2015, 07:35:06 PM »
Yep nice white foam busting through the brown crusty! Also looks like an eyeball BTW [emoji16]
All is well master Luke ..the force is with you


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358
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Kick starting a stuck doppelbock
« on: February 24, 2015, 05:28:35 PM »

Thanks.  I am well aware of that strain, having used it 10 years ago to finish a stuck agave nectar mead (and an absolute fantastic job it did as well).  I thought I would start off with the lager yeast option, before proceeding with Option 2.  Believe me, that is being considered.

Yeah sure thing..always better to throw it out there.

I'd probably follow the same path you're on.


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359
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What kind of beer would these make
« on: February 24, 2015, 05:25:53 PM »

S. bouliardii is the yeast in a kombucha SCOBY, IIRC. It does produce alcohol, but I don't know how well it handles maltose or other longer chain sugars.

I'm not totally up on all the other bacterial strains, but I think they are all lactic strains typically used in yogurt.

Huh.just looked up kombucha...interesting stuff.


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360
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Kick starting a stuck doppelbock
« on: February 24, 2015, 03:58:45 PM »
I brewed a 1.090 doppelbock 5 weeks ago, using WLP810 San Francisco lager yeast, and after three weeks of no activity, I have concluded that it is stuck at 1.032.  I would like to get it down another 4-6 points if I could.

Nine days ago, I brewed a 1.052 pilsner, and split the batch between WLP833 German Bock and WLP940 Mexican lager yeast.  Both are in a temperature controlled freezer set at 50°F.  The 833 is still chugging away, but the 940 is done.

I also have available a half gallon (growler full) of unfermented bock wort.  I grabbed it the day after I brewed, from the bit under the false bottom.  My thought is to boil up that half gallon of wort to ensure it is sanitized, adding a pint of water to knock the gravity down from 1.090 so it wouldn't shock the yeast.  Then I would rack the pils, aerate the wort, then add it to the now empty primary with 940 yeast cake.  After a day, when it gets back to high krausen, I would add that to the stuck beer and swirl that in gently, in hopes to restart.

I am welcome to suggestions to improve my proposed plan.

there's another thread somewhere (cant find it yet) where Mark talks about a yeast called "terminator" that I think he said would be appropriate for situations like this...i will keep looking.

EDIT: here it is...

Your fermentation is not stuck. Windsor cannot ferment maltotriose, which is why you have a high terminal gravity (i.e., Windsor is not the best yeast strain to use with beer styles above 10 to 11 Plato).  You have to deal with a double whammy at this point in that you cannot vigorously aerate a batch that is currently sitting at over 7% ABV.  My suggestion is to pitch 20 grams of the yeast strain that I like to refer to as the Terminator (a.k.a. K1V-1116 or Montpellier).  K1V-1116 (Lalvin K1-V1116) is one of the best kept secrets in high gravity brewing.  Unlike most wine yeast strains, K1V can ferment maltotriose.  K1V is an S. cerevisiae wine strain that is good to 18%.  It also emits a killer toxin that inhibits all other microflora in the fermentation; hence, the name Terminator.  Best of all, K1V is well known for its ability to restart a stalled or under attenuated high gravity fermentation.  K1V is POF- (phenolic off-flavor negative).

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