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Messages - Wort-H.O.G.

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61
Beer Recipes / Re: German themed IPA
« on: May 12, 2015, 07:04:28 AM »
Yea, I kicked it up 1 degree yesterday afternoon and 1 this morning, but it's running 1-2 above set point cause its working so hard

i usually wait for the krausen to start to fall (48 hours or so) and then ramp it up to finish 68-70F.

62
Beer Recipes / Re: German themed IPA
« on: May 12, 2015, 06:57:48 AM »
Guess I missed the good pic: the 090 is blowing bubbles out the top of the airlock it's going so hard. 3 gallons in 5 gallon carboy and it's putting up a good fight

its pretty aggressive. 48 hours and it starts winding down quickly, so let it rise in temp to finish.

63
Ingredients / Re: RO sparge water
« on: May 12, 2015, 04:36:26 AM »
Martin,
Earlier in this thread you mentioned "good RO water".  But what is "good"?  I get RO water from the machine at Wally-mart and check it each time with a cheap pen TDS meter to make sure the machine ain't broke.  The readings are always 14-22 TDS.  I think that's good.  But is it important to know what's in that 14-22 TDS or can I ignore something that small?  Thanks.

my RO reads between 9-13 on TDS. 14-22 would still be negligible contribution-probably mostly chloride and sodium contribution would be my assumption without testing it.

64
i'm curious about something. do you think perhaps that starting a fermentation warmer and holding it there- in your case about 76F produces any different results than a beer pitched cooler and allowed to rise rapidly? e.g. pitched at 64-65F and then when active fermentation starts you don't manage temp control and it rises rapidly to the low to mid 70's?  whenever I've had issues with unwanted esters, its been a result of this.

just thinking out loud  ::)

65
When it comes to improving one's homebrew, likely the most popular recommendation is to start controlling fermentation temperatures. Given the fact the first xBmt on this topic did not achieve statistical significance, I was curious to see how that might change under different conditions. In this go-round, I used a more characterful English yeast and fermented at temps a tad more extreme than in the first xBmt. Results are in!

http://brulosophy.com/2015/05/11/fermentation-temperature-pt-2-english-ale-exbeeriment-results/

im suprised! wlp002 that warm and really nobody detected any significant fruity esters?  this is very interesting indeed Marshall.

Edit: i've got the equivalent wyeast 1968 going right now in an ESB. pitched at 63F, held 65-66F 48 hours and letting it rise up to 70F to finish.

66
Beer Recipes / Re: Lagers
« on: May 11, 2015, 05:52:26 AM »
besides the other things mentioned, for me the next step to really good lagers was figuring out i needed a  healthy and large amount of yeast pitched in the mid-upper 40's, in very well oxygenated wort. then keeping a cool (most times 48-50F) steady fermentation until around 60-65% attenuation is reached, followed by warm up to about 62F to clean up.

67
Sunday is a saison, first one in several months. Going simple with grist - 75% Dingemann Pils, 20% Vienna, 5% Wheat. Gonna see what saison strains are freshest at my LHBS. May blend strains, maybe not. Thinking some late Nelson hopping, for grape-ish character. Can't wait to brew saison when warm weather gets here (or anytime).

Everything went well. Volumes spot on, OG was a point over target. All in all it was good brewing day. Gonna brew again Friday - haven't brewed twice in a week for awhile. Good times.

same here. ESB fermenting nicely at 65F.  what saison yeast did you end up with?

68
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Rubber Handle Kegs
« on: May 10, 2015, 11:34:59 AM »
me...wouldn't sweat it. i'm more interested on the inside  ;D

69
All Grain Brewing / Re: Are my grains still good?
« on: May 10, 2015, 11:29:15 AM »
fresh crush is best but you're probably good to fire it up.

70
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: May 10, 2015, 09:52:02 AM »
Great clarity, Wort-H.O.G.!
What did you do to get that to drop so clear in only a month?
Which yeast did you use?

Do you subscribe to that 'new' lager process, where you pitch cold then warm it up in a controlled temper ascent so it finishes faster than 'traditional' lagers?  Mike McDole is a big proponent of that technique, but I'm not sure what effect that has on flocculation.

Hard to tell the color in that glass from that pic. The bottom looks like bright gold and the top borders on amber.  The lighting plays tricks, too. 

Looks great, though.  Nice job

yes i use the accelerated schedule. pitch 46ish, hold about 49-50 until around 60-65% attenuated, let it rise up to around 62F and hold about 6 days or so there. im now on about day 14, then cold crash a few days before transferring to keg with gelatin. that rests a few days and then begin carbonation.  so from start to finish, about 3-4 weeks ready to drink.

color really is golden yellow around 4 srm i think. yeast was wlp835 on this one, although get same with 830, 833.

71
Ingredients / Re: RO sparge water
« on: May 10, 2015, 07:20:39 AM »

Regarding the need to acidify RO water for sparging use: No, you don't need to acidify. The primary thing of concern with sparging water is that it have low alkalinity. Good RO water already has very low alkalinity. So the need to acidify is gone. Another consideration is that with the very low alkalinity of RO water, it would only take a drop or two of most acids to cause the pH to plummet.

So making sure the pH of the sparge water is below 6.0 does not matter when using RO water that is low in alkalinity?  What if the RO water has a higher pH value, say around 8?  Is this also true when mashing and sparging a dark roasted grist providing the mash water is properly adjusted?
There is no need to acidify low alkalinity sparge water, like RO or distilled, regardless of its pH.  Even if the pH is high, the low alkalinity will allow it to drop easily and rapidly when it hits your grain bed. 
Whether you acidify the mash or not still depends on your target pH and what your grain bill looks like.  If using RO or distilled in the mash, the pH will simply be easier to adjust, again because of the low alkalinity.

So when using RO water, most adjustments can be made via the use of salts as opposed to acid additions?  Unless of course one is looking for a lower mash pH that the salt additions cannot provide without pushing the profile too far out of whack?

Salts will only do so much in the mash. Focus on your target additions for the beer you are making, and use something like lactic acid to lower PH, or baking soda to raise PH in the mash.
I agree with Ken here, but yes you can often get away with not using acid, depending on your intended water profile and grain bill.

yes very true. just didn't want him to try and add crap ton of sulfate or calcium chloride to drive down the mash PH...if you dont get where you want within your water profile target, then lactic acid works well to bump down, and baking soda to bump up.

72
Ingredients / Re: RO sparge water
« on: May 10, 2015, 06:55:02 AM »

Regarding the need to acidify RO water for sparging use: No, you don't need to acidify. The primary thing of concern with sparging water is that it have low alkalinity. Good RO water already has very low alkalinity. So the need to acidify is gone. Another consideration is that with the very low alkalinity of RO water, it would only take a drop or two of most acids to cause the pH to plummet.

So making sure the pH of the sparge water is below 6.0 does not matter when using RO water that is low in alkalinity?  What if the RO water has a higher pH value, say around 8?  Is this also true when mashing and sparging a dark roasted grist providing the mash water is properly adjusted?
There is no need to acidify low alkalinity sparge water, like RO or distilled, regardless of its pH.  Even if the pH is high, the low alkalinity will allow it to drop easily and rapidly when it hits your grain bed. 
Whether you acidify the mash or not still depends on your target pH and what your grain bill looks like.  If using RO or distilled in the mash, the pH will simply be easier to adjust, again because of the low alkalinity.

So when using RO water, most adjustments can be made via the use of salts as opposed to acid additions?  Unless of course one is looking for a lower mash pH that the salt additions cannot provide without pushing the profile too far out of whack?

Salts will only do so much in the mash. Focus on your target additions for the beer you are making, and use something like lactic acid to lower PH, or baking soda to raise PH in the mash.

73
All Grain Brewing / Re: Treating Sparge Water
« on: May 10, 2015, 05:52:24 AM »
Up to this point I've treated my RO water with a TSB of Gypsum and a TSB of CaCl, splitting this amount equally between the strike and sparge water.

I read something this morning that said treating the sparge water is not needed and plain RO is best. Thoughts?

think of it like this- you are trying to create a target water profile for your brew. you can add those salts to mash and sparge water, just to the mash or sparge water, in the kettle. however you do it you just need to plan for the impact at whatever stage you make your additions. for me, its real simple with bru'n water to create my target water profile, make the additions in mash and sparge per the calculations.

edit: i'm curious to hear from others if omitting additions in RO water is more beneficial or not.

74
The Pub / Happy Mother's Day
« on: May 10, 2015, 05:04:17 AM »
To all the brewers that are mom's, and to the mom's attached to the brewer- Happy Mother's Day!

75
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dryness and ABV
« on: May 10, 2015, 04:14:15 AM »
yeah 93%ADT and 6.2% for wlp001 seems crazy.... does the beer have any funny tastes or smells?

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