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Messages - factory

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1
Ingredients / Re: Malts that add body to beer
« on: January 17, 2014, 07:34:25 AM »
My FG for the last 2 brews were 1.010 and 1.012.

pretty consistent with what i'd expect an all basemalt FG.

If you want to stick with all MO, try 158df mash temp as Kyle suggested above. I'd expect a little less attenuation.  If you are fly sparging, are you raising to mashout before sparging?  Just checking as if not, the extra 45-60min at mash temps could make your wort more fermentable.

If you want to use some crystal, which I personally would prefer for some flavor complexity, I would actually start at 7% of a medium (15-45L) crystal, and keep your mid range mash temp.  Then if its too much, rachet down to 5% next time or up to 10% if you still want more.

I batch sparge, so I don't raise up to mash-out temps.  I'm going to try the middle of the road approach with the Crystal and then go from there.  Of course, now that will be later this summer before I get an opportunity to brew again.  I'm in the Navy and I'll be going away for a bit and visiting a hotter climate.  Thanks for all the help and suggestions!

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Frickin cleaning time
« on: January 17, 2014, 07:25:10 AM »
5 gallon buckets + a long window box liner for the long items like racking canes and dip tubes.

I use a wallpaper tray to clean and soak my tubes.

3
Ingredients / Re: Malts that add body to beer
« on: January 17, 2014, 07:02:37 AM »
I'm not denny, but what was the crystal/cara in the first run of the recipe you made, assuming there was at least some?

might actually help us if you posted all the recipe specifics, at least the grain bill, yeast and mash temp.

10% is a pretty good weight for a crystal/cara malt to get you a medium to full body, if using a moderate mash temp (150-155df).  but we'll know more once you let us in on where you're at currently.

I had no crystal or cara-anything in the original recipe.  It had a 100% base of Marris Otter (10 or 11 lbs, I think).  I used plain old WLP001 yeast and I mashed at 154F for about 60 to 75 minutes IIRC.  I also batch sparge with equal amounts of water.  I forget the exact amounts and times (recipe is in BeerSmith on my computer at home) but I used Columbus for bittering (FWH addition) and then amarillo for flavor.
+1 for just upping the mash temp. I find when batch sparging you need to go higher with the mash temp than you would think. What kind of fg are you getting?

My FG for the last 2 brews were 1.010 and 1.012.

4
Equipment and Software / Re: Plate Chiller and Hops
« on: January 10, 2014, 10:04:59 AM »
I have a Blichmann Therminator plate chiller.  It works very well for me as I can cool wort down much more quickly than I could with the IC.  I put a bazooka screen in the boil kettle to keep a large majority of the gunk out of the plate chiller.  After use I immediately run PBW through the plate chiller for about 15 minutes and then back back flush with PBW for another 15.  Then I repeat the process with hot water and then run sanitizer through it.

I read somewhere recommendations for baking the plate chiller in 350F oven for an hour and then flushing and back flushing if you start to get build-up.  So far, I haven't had to do this with my set-up as it stays clean with the cleaning process that I use.

5
Ingredients / Re: Malts that add body to beer
« on: January 09, 2014, 09:50:01 AM »
I'm not denny, but what was the crystal/cara in the first run of the recipe you made, assuming there was at least some?

might actually help us if you posted all the recipe specifics, at least the grain bill, yeast and mash temp.

10% is a pretty good weight for a crystal/cara malt to get you a medium to full body, if using a moderate mash temp (150-155df).  but we'll know more once you let us in on where you're at currently.

I had no crystal or cara-anything in the original recipe.  It had a 100% base of Marris Otter (10 or 11 lbs, I think).  I used plain old WLP001 yeast and I mashed at 154F for about 60 to 75 minutes IIRC.  I also batch sparge with equal amounts of water.  I forget the exact amounts and times (recipe is in BeerSmith on my computer at home) but I used Columbus for bittering (FWH addition) and then amarillo for flavor.

6
Ingredients / Re: Malts that add body to beer
« on: January 09, 2014, 09:34:56 AM »
Thanks Denny!

If I were making a Pale Ale, and wanted to add some body (because personnally I think it tastes a little thin), would 10% of the grain bill for a crystal or cara-something be a good starting point?  Or should I go higher?

7
Ingredients / Re: long term storage of ingrdients
« on: January 09, 2014, 09:27:55 AM »
For long term storage, I use 5 gallon Home Depot buckets with "Gamma" lids.  Keeps the grains nice and air tight.  I store them in a dark corner of the garage.  Cool and dry.

8
Ingredients / Re: Malts that add body to beer
« on: January 09, 2014, 09:21:24 AM »
Sorry, I mean body as in mouth-feel.

9
Ingredients / Re: Crisp chill haze free malt
« on: January 09, 2014, 09:19:13 AM »
Very cool.  "Clearly" I have been waiting for something like this.  I've tried everything, including filtering to make my beers bright.  I like using Crisp's malts anyway, so now this is just another reason to use their malts.

10
Ingredients / Malts that add body to beer
« on: January 09, 2014, 09:06:54 AM »
I've been wondering, if I need to add some body to my beers, which malts should I try?

11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: When should I Force carb?
« on: January 09, 2014, 07:34:31 AM »
My first and only lager was force carbed while lagering.  It appeared to have no noticable effect.  I did it at the recommendation of other members on this forum. 

12
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric RIMS tube question
« on: November 08, 2013, 10:27:09 AM »

Whose RIMS tube are you going to use, or are you building your own?
[/quote]

This one.

http://www.brewhardware.com/rimsherms-parts/169-newrims


13
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric RIMS tube question
« on: November 08, 2013, 06:44:24 AM »
The sensor MUST be placed downstream of the heat input point. It DOES NOT matter what the temperature of the wort from the tun is. It only matters that you are heating the wort to your target temperature and not overheating it. Remember that the enzymes are in the wort, not the mash.  If you try to control your heat input by observing the wort temperature coming out of the tun, you will likely severely overheat your wort as it passes through the heater.  That will likely denature the wort enzymes and leave you with a starchy wort that does not ferment.  (You don't have to ask how I learned that bone-headed lesson ;-)  )

If you want to know the temperature of wort coming from the tun, insert an extra thermometer there.
+1 On Martin's explanation
When you place the sensor downstream of the heat source, the temperature WILL overshoot slightly and that will help to bring your tun up to ideal temp faster.  Use a PID type controller, a RANCO does not react fast enough to keep the wort from overheating. As your wort gets closer to your programmed temp, the overshoot will become less and eventually stabilize withing .5 degrees or so. Also orient your rims tube so there will not be any bubbles or air pockets in the tube (Another lesson for another time!;-) )

Good stuff, thanks!  I'm planning on mounting it vertically to my Top Tier Stand with the element at the bottom and the sensor on the top.

14
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric RIMS tube question
« on: November 07, 2013, 11:12:55 AM »
The sensor MUST be placed downstream of the heat input point. It DOES NOT matter what the temperature of the wort from the tun is. It only matters that you are heating the wort to your target temperature and not overheating it. Remember that the enzymes are in the wort, not the mash.  If you try to control your heat input by observing the wort temperature coming out of the tun, you will likely severely overheat your wort as it passes through the heater.  That will likely denature the wort enzymes and leave you with a starchy wort that does not ferment.  (You don't have to ask how I learned that bone-headed lesson ;-)  )

If you want to know the temperature of wort coming from the tun, insert an extra thermometer there.

Thanks for the explaination! 

15
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric RIMS tube question
« on: November 07, 2013, 10:40:37 AM »
That's what I thought, but I saw one hooked up the other way (mash tun to the heating element first) and thought htat was strange.  My brain couldn't reconcile this, so I had to ask.

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