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Messages - factory

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16
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Making progress with SWMBO
« on: January 26, 2015, 06:29:32 AM »
The wife isn't much of a beer drinker at all, and only likes sweet wines.  We have discovered that any beer with 30 IBUs or less is tolerable to her.  Anything else gets bitter beer face.  It's a start.

17
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« on: January 23, 2015, 09:30:15 AM »
Mine would have to be:

Kolsch (trying to get the diacetyl under control AND make it crisp)
IPA  ('cause HOPS!)
American Brown (I like it year round)
Wit (same here)
Lite American Lager (because I'm close and still haven't hit it out of the park yet)

18
When your weekend revolves around your "production schedule."
What? Non travel weekends are brew weekends!

I'll add: when you keep a hydrometer on the kitchen counter. How many of us do this?

^^^I'm guilty of this. I'm also the only one to wash the beer glasses, because only I "can do it right".

19
When you are the only guest asked/allowed to bring beer to any gathering you attend

Yes! 

20
Equipment and Software / Re: name of electric brew system.
« on: December 19, 2014, 10:13:54 AM »
I looked at it when I was looking to put together my system.  I decided that I would have more versatility and room for expansion if I went with a Blichmann Top Tier.  I seems like a well-made product, and if you are tight on space it would be the way to go.  I have half the garage to work in and I wanted the ability to grow to larger production if I wanted to go that way.

21
Equipment and Software / Re: name of electric brew system.
« on: December 19, 2014, 09:50:43 AM »
Speidels Braumeister I believe is what you are looking for.

22
The Pub / Re: Epic Rant about 10 Barrel & AB/InBev
« on: December 16, 2014, 05:28:44 AM »
I get where he says that InBev is the enemy of craft brewing but I don't understand his hostility at the two brothers selling out. The author obviously has no understanding on how much energy and capital it takes to successfully run a brewery. Frankly, the authors idealism is what is really over the top. I love the people in craft brewing and I undoubtably love the beer but I love my family and myself more and if the price was right you betcha I'd sell.

+1,000,000,000

People in the "Punk scene" hated the band Greenday for "selling out" and going commercial with a big label record contract.  Now I get to listen to them too.  I'm guessing that the band and their families cry every time they look at their bank statements.

23
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: buttery flavor not diacetyl?
« on: December 15, 2014, 11:55:13 AM »
Got it. Consensus = diacetyl even if it wasn't specifically mentioned.  Now I have to figure out how to get rid of it next time.  :)

24
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: buttery flavor not diacetyl?
« on: December 15, 2014, 08:50:42 AM »
Were you frying hot dogs in butter on bottling day?

No, but my boil kettle doubles as a popcorn popper.   :)

25
General Homebrew Discussion / buttery flavor not diacetyl?
« on: December 15, 2014, 08:03:13 AM »
I recently got scoresheets back from a completion in which I entered a Light American Lager.  I sensed a slight buttery flavor to it, but my perception of diacetyl is slightly different (pick it up as a slightly rancid taste with that slickness that you can feel on your tongue).  I entered it anyway, and got it scored at a 34, 36, 38 from the judges.  All noted the butter flavor but not one of them dinged me for diacetyl. I believe that one of the judges was a National. 

All that explanation for this:  Where do buttery flavors come from other than diacetyl? The grain bill was 100% pilsner malt with 1 oz of hallertauer. (.5 oz at 60 and .5 oz at 20)  Mashed at 149 for 75ish minutes. Mashed out at 172 for 10 min. Fermented with WLP840 American Lager yeast at 52F until it hit 1.020 and then a d rest for 4 days at 60F.  OG 1.040 FG 1.015. no filtering, no finings.

26
Ingredients / Re: Vienna in a Kolsch
« on: December 12, 2014, 11:05:06 AM »
My kolsch is 90% pils, 5% light munich, 5% wheat.

That's what I've used on my last couple IIRC.

Thanks!  I'll go with that. Last time (first time) I went with 100% pils.  I thought it might need a little something extra, but didn't have a place to start for how much of what. 

BTW, I'm using an oz each of Tettnang and Hallertauer.  I also need just a touch of gypsum to get my Ca up to 100 ppm and maybe get a little hop charater (not too much).

I have been considering making mine more to style. When are your hop additions?

1 oz Hallertaurer @ 60
.5 oz Tettnang @ 30
.5 oz Tettnang at flameout, stand 20 min (or I might run the wort through my Hop Rocket for this, I haven't decided yet)

27
Ingredients / Re: Vienna in a Kolsch
« on: December 12, 2014, 10:52:53 AM »
My kolsch is 90% pils, 5% light munich, 5% wheat.

That's what I've used on my last couple IIRC.

Thanks!  I'll go with that. Last time (first time) I went with 100% pils.  I thought it might need a little something extra, but didn't have a place to start for how much of what. 

BTW, I'm using an oz each of Tettnang and Hallertauer.  I also need just a touch of gypsum to get my Ca up to 100 ppm and maybe get a little hop charater (not too much).

28
Ingredients / Re: Vienna in a Kolsch
« on: December 12, 2014, 10:26:07 AM »
I use a couple % of munich. you could probably use vienna in the same way.

When you say "couple of a %" do you mean less than 10? Or 5 or less?

29
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: S-33
« on: December 12, 2014, 09:17:02 AM »
Thanks. As usual, I was confused by their description.

"A very popular general purpose yeast, displaying both very robust conservation properties and consistent performance. This yeast produces superb flavour profiles and is used for the production of a varied range of top fermented special beers (Belgian type wheat beers, Trappist, etc.). Sedimentation: medium. Final gravity: high. Also recommended for bottle-conditioning of beers. Excellent performance in beers with alcohol contents of up to 7.5% v/v but can ferment up to 11.5% v/v."

I tried it in a Belgian Wit once.  Didn't get much in the way of phenolics from it IIRC.

30
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: when to add sugars in a high gravity brew
« on: December 12, 2014, 09:13:46 AM »
Here on Belgian forums many people add the sugar after a couple of days into the fermentation. They claim that they can knock off a few points off the FG that way, because the yeast first has to work on the more complex sugars before it gets to the simple sugars. However, I have no personal experience with this method to corroborate.

This is the train of thought that I had.  Let the yeasties go to work on the complex sugars so they don't poop out on all of the simple sugars first.

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