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Messages - factory

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31
General Homebrew Discussion / buttery flavor not diacetyl?
« on: December 15, 2014, 08:03:13 AM »
I recently got scoresheets back from a completion in which I entered a Light American Lager.  I sensed a slight buttery flavor to it, but my perception of diacetyl is slightly different (pick it up as a slightly rancid taste with that slickness that you can feel on your tongue).  I entered it anyway, and got it scored at a 34, 36, 38 from the judges.  All noted the butter flavor but not one of them dinged me for diacetyl. I believe that one of the judges was a National. 

All that explanation for this:  Where do buttery flavors come from other than diacetyl? The grain bill was 100% pilsner malt with 1 oz of hallertauer. (.5 oz at 60 and .5 oz at 20)  Mashed at 149 for 75ish minutes. Mashed out at 172 for 10 min. Fermented with WLP840 American Lager yeast at 52F until it hit 1.020 and then a d rest for 4 days at 60F.  OG 1.040 FG 1.015. no filtering, no finings.

32
Ingredients / Re: Vienna in a Kolsch
« on: December 12, 2014, 11:05:06 AM »
My kolsch is 90% pils, 5% light munich, 5% wheat.

That's what I've used on my last couple IIRC.

Thanks!  I'll go with that. Last time (first time) I went with 100% pils.  I thought it might need a little something extra, but didn't have a place to start for how much of what. 

BTW, I'm using an oz each of Tettnang and Hallertauer.  I also need just a touch of gypsum to get my Ca up to 100 ppm and maybe get a little hop charater (not too much).

I have been considering making mine more to style. When are your hop additions?

1 oz Hallertaurer @ 60
.5 oz Tettnang @ 30
.5 oz Tettnang at flameout, stand 20 min (or I might run the wort through my Hop Rocket for this, I haven't decided yet)

33
Ingredients / Re: Vienna in a Kolsch
« on: December 12, 2014, 10:52:53 AM »
My kolsch is 90% pils, 5% light munich, 5% wheat.

That's what I've used on my last couple IIRC.

Thanks!  I'll go with that. Last time (first time) I went with 100% pils.  I thought it might need a little something extra, but didn't have a place to start for how much of what. 

BTW, I'm using an oz each of Tettnang and Hallertauer.  I also need just a touch of gypsum to get my Ca up to 100 ppm and maybe get a little hop charater (not too much).

34
Ingredients / Re: Vienna in a Kolsch
« on: December 12, 2014, 10:26:07 AM »
I use a couple % of munich. you could probably use vienna in the same way.

When you say "couple of a %" do you mean less than 10? Or 5 or less?

35
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: S-33
« on: December 12, 2014, 09:17:02 AM »
Thanks. As usual, I was confused by their description.

"A very popular general purpose yeast, displaying both very robust conservation properties and consistent performance. This yeast produces superb flavour profiles and is used for the production of a varied range of top fermented special beers (Belgian type wheat beers, Trappist, etc.). Sedimentation: medium. Final gravity: high. Also recommended for bottle-conditioning of beers. Excellent performance in beers with alcohol contents of up to 7.5% v/v but can ferment up to 11.5% v/v."

I tried it in a Belgian Wit once.  Didn't get much in the way of phenolics from it IIRC.

36
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: when to add sugars in a high gravity brew
« on: December 12, 2014, 09:13:46 AM »
Here on Belgian forums many people add the sugar after a couple of days into the fermentation. They claim that they can knock off a few points off the FG that way, because the yeast first has to work on the more complex sugars before it gets to the simple sugars. However, I have no personal experience with this method to corroborate.

This is the train of thought that I had.  Let the yeasties go to work on the complex sugars so they don't poop out on all of the simple sugars first.

37
Ingredients / Vienna in a Kolsch
« on: December 12, 2014, 06:50:06 AM »
Has anyone ever heard of this?  Is it "to style"?  I read in the BJCP Guidelines that wheat malt may sometimes be used, but no mention of Vienna.  Any thoughts?

38
Yeast and Fermentation / when to add sugars in a high gravity brew
« on: December 12, 2014, 06:39:45 AM »
I've been wondering, would it be better to add sugars to a high gravity brew into the boil, pre-fermentation, or let fermentation start, and as it starts to slow down, add the sugars to the fermenter?  I'm curious as to what benefits one method has over the other?

39
Equipment and Software / Re: What is the purpose of a Grant
« on: December 05, 2014, 07:27:19 AM »
Then what? One tour guide, if I understood him correctly, said that they recirculated from the grant back to the mash tun several times before transferring to the kettle.  Sounds like sparging.

Same thing, from what I understand.  When they recirculate the wort (probably like RIMS or HERMS), they use a gravity fed grant so the pump won't create too much suction on the false bottom of the mash tun and compact the grain bed.

40
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Sam Winter Lager
« on: November 25, 2014, 07:05:07 AM »

And it looks like they smartened up and removed the Cranberry "Lambic" from the seasonal 12 pack.  I dumped those bottles every year.
That stuff is awful.
+100.  almost undrinkable IMHO.

41
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Arrogant Bastard Clone classification
« on: November 24, 2014, 06:21:43 PM »
Unless it is exactly like arrogant bastard I would not refer to it as a clone. Judges might think they should judge it on how similar it is to the original.

I'd go with American Amber Ale as the base, and special ingredient being that its Imperial.

Yes, while it is very similar, it is not an "exact" clone.  Just a pretty good attempt.  I wasn't going to mention that it was a clone.  It is a good beer though.  I think it is good enough to see what happens in a competition.

Thanks for the recommendations!

42
General Homebrew Discussion / Arrogant Bastard Clone classification
« on: November 24, 2014, 04:43:37 PM »
I brewed an Arrogant Bastard clone for the Virginia Beer Blitz competition.  Arrogant Bastard is listed as a commercial example in Catagory 23 Specialty Beer.  I have to declare a "base beer" on the entry form.  Should I call it an "American Strong Ale" like beeradvocate does?

43
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: ive gotta ask
« on: November 21, 2014, 07:45:54 AM »
I keep forgetting to mark which one it is, but one of my kegs is bigger on the inside.
Does it resemble the shape of an English call box?
I'm going to label my never ending keg "TARDIS".  LOL  Good one.

44
Equipment and Software / Re: Gravity Samples
« on: November 18, 2014, 06:07:45 AM »
I used to do shake the wine thief up and down to gather enough wort.  If there is any oxygen uptake, I've never noticed any oxidation from doing it.  I now have a conical fermenter with a ball valve at the bottom that I pull the sample from.  One could argue that I could get oxygen pick-up from that as well, but again, I've never noticed any oxidation off flavor or other ill effects from doing this.

45
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: My First Ever Brew
« on: November 17, 2014, 10:11:24 AM »
Great, thanks again for the info guys.  I did look at some photos of exploding beers.  Does not look fun.  I was going to use a bottle of vodka and a tube running from the airlock hole in carboy, but I couldn't get the airlock off. So I decided to leave and hope for the best.  I figure I have enough room (for now) in the carboy, but it's definitely moving up.

I'm engaged, we own a house, and have a Siberian Husky (dog).  If the beer exploded my dog would freak out (then probably drink the beer) and my fiance would take what's left of the beer and move it outside she said.  Then, of course, I'd have to clean it and listen to her yelling in my ear whilst cleaning.  Doesn't sound fun...
Yep. That's why my brewery is now in the garage. 

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