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Messages - rainmaker

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16
General Homebrew Discussion / Can wort heat past 212 when boiling?
« on: March 13, 2014, 10:35:25 AM »
My having a friendly debate with my brewing partner that a kettle used only for boiling the wort does not need a thermometer since we are simply boiling, and the temperature will not exceed 212. He claims it can. Can anyone who is smarter than me help settle this?

17
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Commercial Saisons
« on: August 30, 2013, 02:19:45 PM »
Lots of solid samples out there. Saison dupont is prime. Prairie brewing, Stillwater brewing, and Upright brewing all do solid Saisons.

Personally, I don't consider Hennepin a true Saison. Tank 7 is certain (in my opinion) the best American Saison. For Saisons with character and additions, it's hard to beat Stillwater. Their cellar door is incredible.

18
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 670 not fermenting?
« on: August 27, 2013, 07:29:32 AM »
I didn't pitch a starter. Have only ever pitched starters with higher gravity beers and have never had an issue before

Be aware you are underpitching. And if you don't make a starter it will eventually bite you in the ass. But hopefully in this case it is a leaky bucket lid.

In regards to making a starter, I was under the impression white labs had enough viable cells to pitch directly into the wort?

19
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 670 not fermenting?
« on: August 27, 2013, 07:28:54 AM »
Airlock activity .... you fermenting in a bucket and watching for bubbles by any chance? Airlock activity is not a great indicator of fermentation activity. Bucket lids can have leaks that allow co2 to escape much easier than aitrlock. Of this is the case, pop the lid and have a look.

Otherewise, if you are not seeing actual krausen, tell us about your yeast starter.

Yes, I ferment in buckets for a month then if I plan to extended age move to carboys.

I'll have to pop the lid when I get home. I've always judged fermentation off my airlock and never had an issue, which is why this puzzled me. I try to keep everything as closed up as possible to avoid o2 and contamination.

20
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 670 not fermenting?
« on: August 27, 2013, 07:17:13 AM »
I didn't pitch a starter. Have only ever pitched starters with higher gravity beers and have never had an issue before

21
Yeast and Fermentation / WLP 670 not fermenting?
« on: August 27, 2013, 05:08:29 AM »
I brewed an American Black Saison, 10 gallon batch. 10 lbs 2 row, 2 lbs Rye, 1 lb black prinz malt. 4 ounces maltodextrin. Mt. Hood and Willamette hop additions at 60 and 5 respectively. OG was 1.059. Pitched yeast at 77 degrees on Saturday and haven't seen a bit of airlock activity. For fun, I took 5 gallons of wort and pitched it with lactobacillus and a berliner Weiss yeast from WLP and that's chugging along fine.

So, I'm stumped as to why this yeast hasn't done a thing.

Any thoughts?

22
IME the Wyeast blends produce higher levels of acidity and wild beer-type flavors on the 2nd and 3rd pitch (I haven't gone past 3).

If you're going for a lambic-esque beer with puckering acidity and lots of funk, using slurry from a previous blend pitch is the way to go.

I pull a few pints of slurry and wash down the fermentor before dumping in the next batch. Otherwise you'll collect a LOT of trub/dead yeast over the course of a few batches on the same yeast.

Oak is nice in this type of beer. If it will be in there for awhile (and you want to harbor bugs in them) oak cubes are best. Wider breadth of oak flavors to contribute, more internal surface area for bugs to live.

When you are talking slurry vs trub, how do make the distinction? I was just going to rack the beer off using the spigot and toss the next batch right in. How do you go a out separating the yeast slurry from trub?

I don't think he was suggesting separating yeast from trub. just scoop out a quart or so into a sanitized mason jar and then wash the fermenter.

Can you separate them? Or maybe should I toss some oak in now to harbor some bugs, let it sit a few more weeks, then take the oak and a quart or 2 of wort out. From what I understood from reading Vinnie C.'s AHA presentation, you can soak the wood in it water to kill the weak strains and let the strongest ones around.

Perhaps this is an option for propagation of bugs.

Guess this just went from reusing yeast to full blown experimental status.

23
IME the Wyeast blends produce higher levels of acidity and wild beer-type flavors on the 2nd and 3rd pitch (I haven't gone past 3).

If you're going for a lambic-esque beer with puckering acidity and lots of funk, using slurry from a previous blend pitch is the way to go.

I pull a few pints of slurry and wash down the fermentor before dumping in the next batch. Otherwise you'll collect a LOT of trub/dead yeast over the course of a few batches on the same yeast.

Oak is nice in this type of beer. If it will be in there for awhile (and you want to harbor bugs in them) oak cubes are best. Wider breadth of oak flavors to contribute, more internal surface area for bugs to live.

When you are talking slurry vs trub, how do make the distinction? I was just going to rack the beer off using the spigot and toss the next batch right in. How do you go a out separating the yeast slurry from trub?

24
I don't know what will happen. I think you should just do it. It's mixed fermentation. if 'regular' brewing is 50% science and 50% art sour brewing is 50% science and 80% art  ;)

This is true. I think I'll just go for it. I think I'll also boil some wood chips and toss those in for the long haul as well just to see if I can get sow bugs to harbor in that wood.

25
Interesting. Well, here is another thought... Can I add some wood chips and wort starter to a carboy and add this slurry. Let it sit a year or more and allow the bugs to do some serious work and harbor in the wood, then pull that wood out and use it in another beer?

26
I'm brewing a sour, and it's been in primary for 4 weeks. Plan on racking it into a carboy for long term storage until the bugs are finished.

My question is this. I want to rack a new beer onto the old yeast.  It's white labs belgium sour blend, which I believe contains yeast and bugs. 

Is this a bad idea? Could the saccaromyces be dead but bugs alive, this tainting the new wort I plan to add?

Interesting question.  I've racked on top of 1056 yeast a few times, works great.  But I have no clue on the sour stuff.

I know the bugs will be fine, but I don't want to rack onto dead yeast.  Maybe my window of opportunity is gone because one needs to rack within 2 weeks to avoid autolyzed yeast?  I certainly don't know, but I hope someone does.

27
I'm brewing a sour, and it's been in primary for 4 weeks. Plan on racking it into a carboy for long term storage until the bugs are finished.

My question is this. I want to rack a new beer onto the old yeast.  It's white labs belgium sour blend, which I believe contains yeast and bugs. 

Is this a bad idea? Could the saccaromyces be dead but bugs alive, this tainting the new wort I plan to add?

28
35 and counting!

29
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 565 higher than expected attenuation?
« on: August 07, 2013, 08:12:12 AM »
Well, we're not quite on track with the thread title here, but that's not out of the ordinary from my board experience in other areas....  What I'd ask is: Did you boil the dickens out of this wort after over-sparging?  I did that to a batch and got a lot of kettle caramelization, leaving less fermentable sweetness.  I'm fairly confident this isn't your case, else you'd have mentioned that the wort was darker and more molasses-like than expected.  But it's better to ask than not.

I've not yet done a WLP565 batch, but I have a vial in the 'fridge.  I have used 566 and 585 with light worts and have obtained pretty stiff attenuations (> 85%).

Another thing: I'm not overly experienced, and I ask questions that I've learned to ask as a result of that experience.  I learned by being confused by it that there is a pretty big temperature correction you may need to do if your sg is measured fairly hot.  Did you do that correction for your near 1.055 OG?  If yo measured it quite hot, then you could have another 5-10 points of OG.  Excuse me if you learned that at your mother's knee, but I didn't.

Michael T.

Boiled off a little under a gallon. Used a refractometer for measuring.

did you take your fg reading with the refractometer as well? if so did you apply a correction for already fermented beer? in the presence of alcohol the refractometer will give an inaccurate reading. However there are tool on line to correct for the error and get the true gravity.

a 1.012 un corrected works out to closer to 1.000 corrected.

I used beersmith's conversion tool for fermenting beer.

ahh well, took a shot

I got excited for a second thinking maybe I missed something, but no.

I cracked a bottle yesterday, 2 days after bottling and it already had some carbonation going on. Not sure if this is a precursor of what's to come, because I typically let my bottles sit a week before checking them.

30
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 565 higher than expected attenuation?
« on: August 07, 2013, 08:07:56 AM »
Well, we're not quite on track with the thread title here, but that's not out of the ordinary from my board experience in other areas....  What I'd ask is: Did you boil the dickens out of this wort after over-sparging?  I did that to a batch and got a lot of kettle caramelization, leaving less fermentable sweetness.  I'm fairly confident this isn't your case, else you'd have mentioned that the wort was darker and more molasses-like than expected.  But it's better to ask than not.

I've not yet done a WLP565 batch, but I have a vial in the 'fridge.  I have used 566 and 585 with light worts and have obtained pretty stiff attenuations (> 85%).

Another thing: I'm not overly experienced, and I ask questions that I've learned to ask as a result of that experience.  I learned by being confused by it that there is a pretty big temperature correction you may need to do if your sg is measured fairly hot.  Did you do that correction for your near 1.055 OG?  If yo measured it quite hot, then you could have another 5-10 points of OG.  Excuse me if you learned that at your mother's knee, but I didn't.

Michael T.

Boiled off a little under a gallon. Used a refractometer for measuring.

did you take your fg reading with the refractometer as well? if so did you apply a correction for already fermented beer? in the presence of alcohol the refractometer will give an inaccurate reading. However there are tool on line to correct for the error and get the true gravity.

a 1.012 un corrected works out to closer to 1.000 corrected.

I used beersmith's conversion tool for fermenting beer.

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