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Messages - rainmaker

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46
Ingredients / Re: Anyone use the Pur Mineral filter?
« on: July 15, 2013, 05:27:21 PM »
Interesting.  I've done about a half dozen batches without any treat and don't get any off flavors. 

My thought on the filter was are the minerals something that may add a desirable taste.

47
Ingredients / Anyone use the Pur Mineral filter?
« on: July 15, 2013, 01:54:52 PM »
Saw this at target the other day. It claims to filter chlorine, mercury, lead, blah blah blah and filters the water through a mineral bed. I've got city water that's super soft and thought about giving this a whirl just to see if I could taste a difference in my beers.

48
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: July 13, 2013, 09:06:08 AM »
My last Berliner kept chugging for months (ma in October, kegged and consumed at a Cinco de Mayo party this past spring....  If you want it quick, then you should do a sour mash, then boil or approach 180f for short time then chill and pitch the yeast at ambient temps;  or skip the Brett and go with the straight lacto pitch followed by the yeast a few days in.  At least that is what I read from experienced sour guys around here.

Hmm, this is an interesting thought.  Straight lacto pitch for a few days then yeast.  There is some white labs berliner yeast I saw at the lhbs that I may pick up

49
What a out boiling them down, pureeing, freezing, then adding? Even leas chance of infection?

Sure... If you feel that froggy... Take the leap!

I'm just trying to mitigate any possible risks!

50
What a out boiling them down, pureeing, freezing, then adding? Even leas chance of infection?

51
Are there any contamination risks to adding fruit?

Yes. Like Mort said, I would wait until primary fermentation is complete. You are less at risk of contamination at this point. Some people will pasteurize the fruit, but I just freeze and thaw. This will kill off bacteria and break up the fruit skin more to allow the flavors to escape into the beer.

Mind elaborating on why the risk is down once primary slows?

There is a presence of alcohol and a lower pH level. This isn't a great environment for bacteria growth, therefor being less susceptible to contamination.

Awesome.  Thanks for the info!

52
Are there any contamination risks to adding fruit?

Yes. Like Mort said, I would wait until primary fermentation is complete. You are less at risk of contamination at this point. Some people will pasteurize the fruit, but I just freeze and thaw. This will kill off bacteria and break up the fruit skin more to allow the flavors to escape into the beer.

Mind elaborating on why the risk is down once primary slows?

53
Are there any contamination risks to adding fruit?

54
fruit sour?

do a simply golden ale with some simple sugar and pitch lots of bugs and bottle dregs at it and then add the fruit as well. whole hog

So pitch the fruits whole when I pitch the yeast?

55
Got a great deal on some fresh fruit and would like to brew some sort of sour with it. Thoughts? Help?

My first thought was a fruited berliner, but then I considered a sour mash amber ale with plums. 

Any who, just looking for some thoughts and help?

Also, with the fruit being fresh and whole, should I wash and cut up a while or wait till brew day, which is Sunday?

56
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Refractometer Sale
« on: July 11, 2013, 07:45:38 PM »
Mine showed up today.  Only a soft case, but still quite happy with the purchase

57
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: July 11, 2013, 10:13:26 AM »
I definitely agree with putting it away for a few months. The first time I used Brett I bottled too soon and ended up with extremely overcarbonated beer.

Cheers,
Brandon

I've let it sit since posting.  Plan to let it go for another month or so

58
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 11, 2013, 09:12:48 AM »
Pics. But, try a commercial bottle conditiond like Sierra Nevada, there's floaties. I wouldn't sweat it

Oh, not sweating it, just trying to figure out why it's there because there was little to no yeast in suspension when I bottled, so I'm curious what caused these flakes to form in 3 days

I wouldn't worry either.  I used to have hop floaties in my beer.  Then I started racking into the fermenting bucket instead of pouring the whole thing and that took care of most of it. 

Now I whirlpool the wort at the end of the boil to make a pile of trub in the center of the kettle and rack into the carboy from the edge of the kettle.  No more trub in the finished product other than yeast. 

I'd expect plenty of yeast to still be in suspension though.  What is your method of filtration?

Maybe filter isn't correct. I do the same thing whirlpool wise, then rack from the edge.  I rack into secondary and finally rack into the bottling bucket, so 3 total racks. I had assumed that most of the yeast was gone. When I saw all this I was wow, where did that come from?

So bottom line is the yeast in suspension, when hit with the priming sugar, flocs out again?

if the yeast were all gone you wouldn't get any carbonation. yes it looks like totally normal yeast sedimentation from bottle conditioning. What yeast did you use? I suspect it was a fairly clumpy one like 1968 or similar.

568 Saison blend from white labs

59
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 11, 2013, 03:55:45 AM »
Pics. But, try a commercial bottle conditiond like Sierra Nevada, there's floaties. I wouldn't sweat it

Oh, not sweating it, just trying to figure out why it's there because there was little to no yeast in suspension when I bottled, so I'm curious what caused these flakes to form in 3 days

I wouldn't worry either.  I used to have hop floaties in my beer.  Then I started racking into the fermenting bucket instead of pouring the whole thing and that took care of most of it. 

Now I whirlpool the wort at the end of the boil to make a pile of trub in the center of the kettle and rack into the carboy from the edge of the kettle.  No more trub in the finished product other than yeast. 

I'd expect plenty of yeast to still be in suspension though.  What is your method of filtration?

Maybe filter isn't correct. I do the same thing whirlpool wise, then rack from the edge.  I rack into secondary and finally rack into the bottling bucket, so 3 total racks. I had assumed that most of the yeast was gone. When I saw all this I was wow, where did that come from?

So bottom line is the yeast in suspension, when hit with the priming sugar, flocs out again?

60
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 10, 2013, 07:15:51 PM »
Pics. But, try a commercial bottle conditiond like Sierra Nevada, there's floaties. I wouldn't sweat it

Oh, not sweating it, just trying to figure out why it's there because there was little to no yeast in suspension when I bottled, so I'm curious what caused these flakes to form in 3 days

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