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Messages - rainmaker

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61
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 11, 2013, 09:12:48 AM »
Pics. But, try a commercial bottle conditiond like Sierra Nevada, there's floaties. I wouldn't sweat it

Oh, not sweating it, just trying to figure out why it's there because there was little to no yeast in suspension when I bottled, so I'm curious what caused these flakes to form in 3 days

I wouldn't worry either.  I used to have hop floaties in my beer.  Then I started racking into the fermenting bucket instead of pouring the whole thing and that took care of most of it. 

Now I whirlpool the wort at the end of the boil to make a pile of trub in the center of the kettle and rack into the carboy from the edge of the kettle.  No more trub in the finished product other than yeast. 

I'd expect plenty of yeast to still be in suspension though.  What is your method of filtration?

Maybe filter isn't correct. I do the same thing whirlpool wise, then rack from the edge.  I rack into secondary and finally rack into the bottling bucket, so 3 total racks. I had assumed that most of the yeast was gone. When I saw all this I was wow, where did that come from?

So bottom line is the yeast in suspension, when hit with the priming sugar, flocs out again?

if the yeast were all gone you wouldn't get any carbonation. yes it looks like totally normal yeast sedimentation from bottle conditioning. What yeast did you use? I suspect it was a fairly clumpy one like 1968 or similar.

568 Saison blend from white labs

62
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 11, 2013, 03:55:45 AM »
Pics. But, try a commercial bottle conditiond like Sierra Nevada, there's floaties. I wouldn't sweat it

Oh, not sweating it, just trying to figure out why it's there because there was little to no yeast in suspension when I bottled, so I'm curious what caused these flakes to form in 3 days

I wouldn't worry either.  I used to have hop floaties in my beer.  Then I started racking into the fermenting bucket instead of pouring the whole thing and that took care of most of it. 

Now I whirlpool the wort at the end of the boil to make a pile of trub in the center of the kettle and rack into the carboy from the edge of the kettle.  No more trub in the finished product other than yeast. 

I'd expect plenty of yeast to still be in suspension though.  What is your method of filtration?

Maybe filter isn't correct. I do the same thing whirlpool wise, then rack from the edge.  I rack into secondary and finally rack into the bottling bucket, so 3 total racks. I had assumed that most of the yeast was gone. When I saw all this I was wow, where did that come from?

So bottom line is the yeast in suspension, when hit with the priming sugar, flocs out again?

63
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 10, 2013, 07:15:51 PM »
Pics. But, try a commercial bottle conditiond like Sierra Nevada, there's floaties. I wouldn't sweat it

Oh, not sweating it, just trying to figure out why it's there because there was little to no yeast in suspension when I bottled, so I'm curious what caused these flakes to form in 3 days

64
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 10, 2013, 06:57:54 PM »





22 ouncers for the record

65
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 10, 2013, 05:46:31 PM »
Possibly hop debris?

 Filtered it before hand, racked twice. Unless something would cause the priming sugar or residual matter to form into flakes?

66
Kegging and Bottling / Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 10, 2013, 05:21:49 PM »
I used star San to sanitize my bottles, racked over my beer from the yeast cake into my bottling bucket, added the pricing sugar and bottled. 

This was Sunday. Checked my bottles out of curiosity to see what kind of sediment if any had settled down. Before bottling the beer had cleared fairly well.

If looking at the bottom of the bottle, there is a noticeable sediment, and when swirled it looks like flakes floating in the beer.

For reference, this was bottled Sunday and no fining agents were used.

67
Equipment and Software / Re: Options other than racking cane?
« on: July 08, 2013, 07:44:19 AM »
"Stop when full" - are you talking about filling bottles? If so, add a bottling wand which will only fill when you push down on the bottom of the bottle.

Yes, sorry for not clarifying.  I'm talking about filling bottles.

Perhaps racking cane wasn't correct. The little bottle filler that has the spring loaded tip. It works fine, but I'd prefer something I can set on the bottle and it will automatically stop once full. Is something like this made?

68
Equipment and Software / Options other than racking cane?
« on: July 07, 2013, 01:38:56 PM »
I'm wondering if there is something out there that is better and easier to use than a racking cane, one that would automatically stop when full or something of the nature?

69
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: June 26, 2013, 08:01:20 AM »
It's a pellicle from something in the dregs you added. It is safe although if you sample some of the beer with the pellicle you might not enjoy the filmy texture. Don't worry, the pellicle will either drop out on its own or fall apart during bottling.

Both of the beers you added dregs from look like they should only have lactobacillus but I don't know that for sure. There may be brett or other bacteria in addition to lacto. I would recommend checking the gravity once a week and see when it stabilizes. Lacto is a fast moving bacteria so once it's run out of sugars it can consume it's done. However, if you keep seeing the gravity slowly dropping week by week you've got something else in there that's chewing up your beer and you will have to make a decision about either bottling it and drinking it fairly quickly or letting it ride until it is stable.

According to madfermentationist, cuvee freddy has the whole gamut of bugs, Brett, lacto, and pedio.

I haven't tasted it yet, so perhaps I'll pull a sample to test the gravity and taste test

70
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: June 26, 2013, 07:33:01 AM »
yes it's a pellicle. Yes, it's totally safe. It is also likely quite taste. I have a batch pitched with, among other things, some cuvee freddy dregs and it already tastes awesome after about 5 weeks.

How did you decide it was three points from fg? Especially with mixed fermentations you can't really make a determination of what the fg 'should' be. those bugs are going to keep eating what they can until they can't.

but yeah, short answer is it's fine. It's not just lacto though. if you used the cuvee freddy it has a full compliment of bugs in there.

I am using beer smith for my calculations. Was to finish at 1.009. When I checked a week after pitching wlp001, it had dropped to 1.012. I'm new to bugs so it's been an exciting journey.

It sat on bugs for 2 weeks before I racked to secondary, but I have no idea how much is still working in there.

71
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: June 26, 2013, 07:10:47 AM »
You can bottle the beer and let carbonate.  You should monitor the carbonation as the bugs may continue to work slowly eat up the sugars and increasing the carbonation.  If the beer is getting overcarbonated it is time to put it all in the fridge.

Also I'm unclear if you did a boil or not.

Did not boil it after pitching bugs. From what I've read all the bugs but Brett ate probably done due to alcohol or pH.

72
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: June 26, 2013, 06:56:12 AM »
I let the bugs work for a week then pitched wlp001. Took a reading a week after and was 3 points from fg. It's now been sitting for an additional 2 weeks and I haven't checked it since

73
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: June 26, 2013, 03:41:58 AM »
I'll defer to others for the correct answer, but I thought the boil was supposed to kill off any bugs left in the berliner mash.

After reading your posting realized I left out a very important detail. I pitched some dregs from 1809 and Cuvee Freddy to see what would happen, and racked off of the yeast after a week. Thus shot is taken 4 weeks in, and I plan to bottle this week.

Any suggestions for bottling, or just go about it like any other?

74
Yeast and Fermentation / Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: June 25, 2013, 04:18:25 PM »
Sorry for the bad photo, but I was wondering if anyone can help with this.... It's a very thin film with intermittent bubbles. My question is, what is it from, and is it safe?


75
Raw grain is bugs.  It's a lactobacillus culture on the husk of the grain that causes the souring.  I'm also assuming that the kit is in the style of Moose Drool, which is pretty bitter if I recall.  Lacto isnt a fan of higher IBUs.

Ah, I had no idea. A local homebrew guy did it with a berliner but said it had to do with the enzymes, which I assumed didn't mean bacteria. 

I like the idea of the sour mash, hadn't considered it since I'm not familiar with making one. I'll go do some research on this.


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