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Messages - malzig

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61
All Grain Brewing / Re: Next Step-Water
« on: March 08, 2013, 05:51:11 AM »
So for my lighter beers-obviously dependent upon the grist, it seems that if I add between 5-10 grams of CaSO4 I can get up to 100-125 ppm of Ca and about 5 grams of MgSO4 will raise my sulfates to about 200. Would these be good thresholds to get the crisper, hoppy elements I am looking for?

For the darker beers would I then only worry about the CaSO4 additions and forget about the others?
To add sulfate, stick with CaSO4 and leave out the MgSO4, you don't need the Mg.

I prefer CaCl2 for dark beer, not CaSO4, to mellow it out a bit.

62
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Chemistry
« on: March 08, 2013, 05:41:59 AM »
I think using baking soda to raise mash pH is fine. In the past I have gotten push-back on that idea since brewers seem to be afraid of sodium. But its nice to see that others are also coming to the conclusion that unless your sodium is already elevated that use of baking soda is just fine.

Kai
It's also very effective at raising pH and safe to handle.

63
All Grain Brewing / Re: My First Batch Sparge
« on: February 27, 2013, 04:33:59 AM »
Gotcha. I meant to say that lower mash temperatures usually mean that the beta amylase gets the sugars broken down more, for a thinner, more fermentable wort (lower gravity than would be the case at a higher temp mash of the same grain).
I figured that's what you meant, but I thought it might be confusing, considering the topic under discussion.

64
All Grain Brewing / Re: My First Batch Sparge
« on: February 26, 2013, 05:12:13 PM »
Denny must be right on this.  It runs counter to the concept of lower mash temp getting more fermentables, generally, but it has been my experience, as well.
Don't confuse getting more extract with getting a more fermentable wort.  Higher mash temperatures will often yield more sugars sooner (both fermentable and nonfermentable, potentially yielding a higher OG) than lower mash temperatures, but the cooler mash will usually be more fermentable (it will finish at a lower gravity from the same OG).
I have not experienced any change in fermentability by sparging with hotter water.  It's a good theory, but I haven't seen it in practice.
Nor have I, though I imagine it would depend on how much conversion has occurred before you raise the temperature.  For me, there is little to no conversion left to occur during the sparge, so it can't change fermentability.  I suppose that could be true for you, as well.

But anyway, that wasn't the statement I was trying to clarify.  "lower mash temp getting more fermentables" was what I found misleading.  A lower mash temperature can get you a more fermentable wort than a higher mash temperature (independent of the sparge), but a hotter step or sparge can increase the total extract by improving conversion.  I suppose that might decrease fermentability, but it is almost certain to increase the total amount of fermentables in an under-converted mash, simply by improving conversion after a cooler mash.

65
All Grain Brewing / Re: My First Batch Sparge
« on: February 26, 2013, 04:44:16 AM »
Denny must be right on this.  It runs counter to the concept of lower mash temp getting more fermentables, generally, but it has been my experience, as well.
Don't confuse getting more extract with getting a more fermentable wort.  Higher mash temperatures will often yield more sugars sooner (both fermentable and nonfermentable, potentially yielding a higher OG) than lower mash temperatures, but the cooler mash will usually be more fermentable (it will finish at a lower gravity from the same OG).

66
All Grain Brewing / Re: My First Batch Sparge
« on: February 25, 2013, 11:34:49 AM »
I've seen hotter sparge water increase efficiency, but I don't believe it's due to reduced viscosity of the sugars.  I think it's due to the more complete gelatinization and conversion of the remaining starches.
Have you seen a gravity difference of .008 from this?
If you expected 1.070 from 70% mash efficiency, then 0.008 would be just about what you could expect to see from improved gelatinization and conversion of the remaining starches.

67
All Grain Brewing / Re: 10-gal Batch with 2 different OG's
« on: February 21, 2013, 05:43:00 PM »
Yes, but after boiling for an hour it is completely mixed.
Absolutely.

68
All Grain Brewing / Re: 10-gal Batch with 2 different OG's
« on: February 19, 2013, 04:08:26 AM »
Is it possible that the higher gravity portion would sink to the bottom? That's where his came from and mine came from the top.  You wouldn't think so though after a 90-minute boil.
It is surprisingly difficult to mix the two runnings evenly prior to the boil.  That's why I take my "pre-boil" gravity reading right after the wort starts boiling.  It is quite possible that your wort wasn't completely mixed when you split it in two.

69
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash Tun
« on: February 19, 2013, 03:57:07 AM »
I have a dip tube attached to my braid so that I don't need to tip the tun.  Before I added that, I just tipped the tun at the end of each running.

70
All Grain Brewing / Re: My First Batch Sparge
« on: February 17, 2013, 10:09:18 AM »
Is there any harm in sparging with water that's less than 170 after equilibrium is reached?  I've been batch sparging using 172F water, which probably equalizes at considerably less than 168F (I haven't bothered to measure it at this point).
Nope.  It may be important that you not go too high, but there isn't really a "too low" to worry about.  I usually sparge with water in the mid to low 160s.

71
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash Schedule help please
« on: February 17, 2013, 10:03:49 AM »
So I think just mashing @ 148F for 90 minutes seems to be where I'll get my best efficiency?
148F is often chosen to maximize fermentability, but it isn't optimum for efficiency, since it can hinder conversion (depending on other variables).  When I mash at 148F, which I often do, I infuse hot water part way through the mash to get the temperature up over 155F, but below 162F, to maximize my chance at getting efficient conversion and a good overall mash efficiency.

72
All Grain Brewing / Re: 10-gal Batch with 2 different OG's
« on: February 17, 2013, 09:57:22 AM »
When did you split into two batches?  Did you split the grain into two mashes or the wort into two kettles?

I assume the first, since the second would have to have the same OG.  The first would have two different OGs because you're two systems have two different efficiencies.  Things like dead volume, sparge volume, mash thickness, mash time and mash temperatures can all affect the efficiency from an otherwise identical bag of crushed grain.  That is assuming you split grain from the same crush, otherwise, crush tends to be the overwhelming variable.

73
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing Calculator and Mash Eff
« on: February 11, 2013, 04:43:03 PM »
...You then calculate the Maximum Ppg As-Is for each grain on the bill with the following equation:

Max-Ppg As-Is= (Max Ppg*lbs of grain)/pre boil volume
It doesn't have to be pre-boil volume.  Post-boil volume and gravity will give you the same value.
Quote
Beersmith uses brewhouse effiiciency and estimates a mash efficiency. For this to be correct, you must go to your equipment profile and enter your system losses correctly or the estimated mash efficiency will not be right.
Beersmith has an implementation of this that continues to confuse people, much like it's bizarre suggestions of multiple small batch sparges.  It may be a lot easier to just do the calculation by hand, using 36 ppg as a decent average potential, if you don't have the actual potential for your lot of grain.

74
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing Calculator and Mash Eff
« on: February 11, 2013, 04:38:23 AM »
Measure the volume (in gallons) and gravity (in SG) in your kettle before or after your boil.  You can probably assume that your grain has a potential of ~36 points per pound per gallon.

pounds of grain x 36 = potential yield

measured gravity x volume = actual yield

100 x actual/potential = mash efficiency (%)

75
Mash efficiency tends to be higher for mashes performed at the high end of the range over the low end.  This is probably due to improved starch gelatinization at higher temperatures, but might also be affected by greater enzyme activity at higher temperatures.  It's a balance with enzyme denaturation, but chemical reactions occur more rapidly as temperature increases.  Both of these factors become less of a factor with a finer crush and a higher water to grain ratio.

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