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Messages - flars

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1
After reading this post I have a question.  Could I take a 5 gallon brew kit, and split it in half?  What I mean is since you lose about 1/2 gallon of liquid during the boil, start with 2 independent kettles with 2.75 gallons in each, so as you have a total of 5.5 gallons, and after boiling be left with 5 gallons.  In one kettle you boil your specialty grains and hops, and in the other kettle you boil only the liquid extract.  Therefore, you get the maximum utilization from your hops, since the gravity of the boil won't be to high due to your boiling the extract in a separate kettle.  And you will still achieve the hot break in both kettles. After the required time for the boil, after flame out, and cooling both kettles, combine both kettles in the primary fermenter.  Why not just boil in a kettle large enough to accommodate over 5 gallons??? Because I only have a 5 gallon kettle, I want to experiment, and want to try to squeeze as much out of my hops as I can.

You can use two kettles.  Don't boil the grains though.  Grains are usually just meant for steeping unless it is a partial mash kit.  Boiling the grains will extract tannins.  It would be better to add extract to both kettles to have a wort of 1.040 SG in each.  Add half the hops to each kettle to optimize hop oil isomerization.  Fifteen minutes before the end of the boil add the remaining extract to both kettles.

YOu know what Flars. You may of just said what I needed to hear.

When I brewed the Kits. All of them told me to put the Speciality grains in the bag, put in the water and bring the water up to temp and then let it sit.

Would this have anything to do with the bitterness? Leaving the grains in the water and bring to temp. would that cause it to be bitter?

Because if leaving them in longer then needed time could cause bitterness, that could very well bee the issue I had.

What temperature do you brings the grains up to?  Do you move the bag around in the water as it is heating.

I'll begin with the bag of steeping grains in 2.5 gallons.  This is for a 5 gallon recipe.  I'll heat the water to about 160°F then drain the grain bag over the boil kettle in a strainer followed by a rinse of 1 quart of just warm water.  The rinse extracts more colors and left over sugars.

I have noticed that when the grain bag just lays on the bottom of the kettle while heating their is the noticeable sound of boiling.  Heat trapped under the bag may be raising the temperature of some of the grains to the boil point with possible tannin extraction.  I'll use my spoon to move the bag to prevent over heating.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydrometer Temperature Accuracy
« on: May 10, 2017, 03:20:56 PM »
Hydrometers are most accurate at the calibration temperature.  As the temperature of the wort increases the accuracy decreases.

3
Thanks Brewin, I was thinking of dumping all into my bottling bucket, mix in a small amt of yeast & sugar, then rebottle.
Pouring you beer back into the bucket will oxidize it.  You could add one Domino "Dot" sugar cube to each bottle if available in your area.  Will yield about 2.4 volumes of CO2 in a 12 ounce bottle.  Each Dot is 2.29 grams.

4
After reading this post I have a question.  Could I take a 5 gallon brew kit, and split it in half?  What I mean is since you lose about 1/2 gallon of liquid during the boil, start with 2 independent kettles with 2.75 gallons in each, so as you have a total of 5.5 gallons, and after boiling be left with 5 gallons.  In one kettle you boil your specialty grains and hops, and in the other kettle you boil only the liquid extract.  Therefore, you get the maximum utilization from your hops, since the gravity of the boil won't be to high due to your boiling the extract in a separate kettle.  And you will still achieve the hot break in both kettles. After the required time for the boil, after flame out, and cooling both kettles, combine both kettles in the primary fermenter.  Why not just boil in a kettle large enough to accommodate over 5 gallons??? Because I only have a 5 gallon kettle, I want to experiment, and want to try to squeeze as much out of my hops as I can.

You can use two kettles.  Don't boil the grains though.  Grains are usually just meant for steeping unless it is a partial mash kit.  Boiling the grains will extract tannins.  It would be better to add extract to both kettles to have a wort of 1.040 SG in each.  Add half the hops to each kettle to optimize hop oil isomerization.  Fifteen minutes before the end of the boil add the remaining extract to both kettles.

5
Ingredients / Re: Juniper tree
« on: May 02, 2017, 08:46:37 AM »
This is a good short read.
http://www.ginfoundry.com/botanicals/juniper/
One interesting bit of information about 5 different gins produced by a distillery changing only which species of juniper berry is used.

6
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Question about Partial/Full Boils.
« on: April 30, 2017, 12:10:55 PM »
Extreme bitterness could be due to tannin extraction from the steeping grains.  Tannin extraction is more related to pH than temperature.  Steeping grains in large volumes of water can increase the likely hood that that grains will not buffer the volume of water to reduce the pH below 6.0.

Another way to produce a very bitter beer is to boil prehopped LME in a kit.  Give us some details on the last beer you brewed that was to bitter to drink.

7
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Question about Partial/Full Boils.
« on: April 30, 2017, 10:57:41 AM »
You can do that.  Hop oil isomerization might be a little more efficient resulting in a 5 to 10% increase in IBUs but that may not be noticeable, or objectionable, in the finished beer.  You can also add just enough extract, DME first, at the beginning of the boil for a 1.040 wort to produce a lighter colored beer.  Heating extract which has already been heated in production will add a deeper color to the beer. Add the remainder of the extract with about 15 minutes left in the boil.   When you boil the wort it is not necessary to have small volcanoes erupting throughout the 60 minute boil.  Applying less heat to the boil kettle maintaining a low boil will help to produce a less dark beer.

Start with about 5.5 gallons in the boil kettle until you are sure of the boil off rate with your equipment.

8
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast washing/harvesting question
« on: April 24, 2017, 02:07:26 PM »
That is a lot of yeast.  You won't be seeing any separation into layers.

9
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Red capper
« on: April 24, 2017, 10:29:59 AM »
Try some teflon tape on the threads to hold the bell more securely.  If the tape works pick up a Super Agata bench capper and keep the wing capper just in case it is needed.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast washing/harvesting question
« on: April 23, 2017, 08:47:34 PM »
Looks like you have pure yeast in your jars if the pictures were taken after a few days in the refrigerator.

11
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Where'd my 5 gallon brew go??
« on: April 19, 2017, 04:43:01 PM »
Is your fermentor accurately marked for the five gallon level?  You can always bump up your volume in the fermentor with DME to cover the expected volume loss to trub.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dryhop clump oops!
« on: April 15, 2017, 11:12:49 AM »
Not really thinking, I dumped a clump of pellets in for dryhopping and heard the clunk of them hitting the bottom.

I cannot agitate the not do I want to for fear of oxidation.

Think I should dump in some more hops this time broken up?

You may or may not need to dry hop again.  Did the hop pellets smell fresh when you opened the package?  The pellets clumping into a block may mean they were exposed to air and moisture degrading the freshness.  The pellets will break apart with saturation but the quality may not be at the fullest potential.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: DME or LME for adjusting my Low OG?
« on: March 27, 2017, 09:19:23 AM »
The hydrometer reading will also be affected by the temperature of the SG sample.  Here is a link to Palmer's previous edition with a conversion chart.  Sample temperatures above the calibration temperature of your hydrometer will read a lower SG than the actual SG.
http://howtobrew.com/book/appendices/appendix-a/using-hydrometers

The temperature of your SG sample was only a minor part of your SG discrepancy though.

14
Ingredients / Re: Brew Kits
« on: March 23, 2017, 03:49:09 PM »
I like what Northern Brewer offers.  Great recipes, fresh, and quality ingredients.

15
Leave the beer in the primary.  What temperature is the beer in the fermentor?  Are you using a refractometer or hydrometer for SG?

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