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Messages - klickitat jim

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136
Commercial Beer Reviews / pFriem Blonde IPA
« on: June 11, 2015, 03:08:19 PM »
I found an IPA that I like. Well, another one. So now there's maybe 3 or 4.

pFriem Blonde IPA:
A - piney grapefruit zest, clean mixed fruity fermentation
A - brilliant straw with tiny bubbles and a thin bright white head and lace
F - pretty much matches the aroma, plenty firm bitterness with a piney grapefruit flesh ant zest followup. Finishes dry and clean with a pleasant grapefruit aftertaste
M - medium-light bodied, no stickiness, slickness, or astringency
O - ranks up there with PTE in my opinion, my favorites (that I can get easily) are FW Union Jack, Deschutes Fresh Squeezed,  and now pFriem.


137
The Pub / Re: American Pharoah vs Secretariat
« on: June 11, 2015, 02:07:36 PM »
Well there ya go. Hard to beat that

138
The Pub / Re: American Pharoah vs Secretariat
« on: June 11, 2015, 12:48:10 PM »
Im curious how they match up in the other two races. If Pharoah would have beat secretariat in one of them, then neither would be triple crown if they raced together.

139
I am by no means a sour beer expert, but afaik it is not recommended to make a starter from the dregs of a mixed culture (i.e. from a beer made with sacch, brett, pedio, lacto, etc.) because the different critters do all not grow at the same rate. So the ratios in the starter will be different from the ratios in the original beer.
While the ratios may change, I don't think that makes a huge difference in the finished beer. If you don't make a starter there may not be too much simple sugar available to the lacto by the time it has grown to a healthy cell count. You certainly don't need to make a starter from dregs, but if you want to use them as your primary culture for a beer I think you're better off having them healthy.

Plus, who's to say that the ratio of viable bugs in the bottle is the same as those when the fermentation started? If you're culturing from a gueuze you have critters that are 3+ years old and probably not in their best shape, if they survived.
Yup. Except that most dont start from scratch. Most repitch their blend. So you're right, but what they pitched in that batch was also left over from the previous batch. Not like a laboratory melange that is sure to change after batch one. At some point the repitched commercial inoculation is what it is and pretty much stays what it is because its reached stability. A total least that sounds right in my head. Probably im wrong.

140
Equipment and Software / Re: Handing down to sours
« on: June 11, 2015, 08:08:08 AM »
You're wrong for drinking sours, duh!

I wonder, have you ever tried a world-class sour beer like from Russian River, Rodenbach or Cantillon?
Agreed. Plus,assuming all "sour" beers are nothing but super sour or super horsey is akin to saying I don't like craft beer cuz they're all 100 IBUs. There's all types and levels of those types.

Yeah, well, I was generalizing. I am just not a sour fan. I've tried multiple sours. Haven't had any of the ones listed but I've had some that I'm sure some people would consider "world class". I just think it's funny to be so into contaminated beer. It's probably how all beer tasted up until about 200 years ago.

Alright, I'm out, I'm really not trying to be a troll here. I realize everyone has different preferences and tastes.

Cheersk.
Absolutely no offense taken here. Its ok to not like sour beer. I just think you're missing out and probably haven't tried the ones you'd like yet. Some of todays sours probably taste like beer from 200 years ago. But on the other hand, I think some of today's sours, and sours yet to be made, are a whole other animal and far better than anything from the past.

141
Events / Re: NHC 2016 Location
« on: June 11, 2015, 07:59:46 AM »
Looks like my first NHC will be 2017
The AHA is looking at a West Coast (2015), East Coast (2016), Mid-section (2017) cadence.

Coming to flyover country, Jim?
I'd be up for that. I've been in every state but Hawaii, Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire. But my experience in the states between Massachusetts and North Carolina was not good. Way too many people. Freaks me out!

Seems to me a trip to New England would all but complete your list, saving Hawaii for last.  Most of northern NE (NH, VT, ME) have their populated areas, but there are places you could go where you won't see people for miles.  Some great beer out this way too. 

This weekend is the start of the annual Bike Week in Laconia, in the lakes region of NH.  They're expecting about 400,000 people during the week.  I don't ride so I tend to avoid the area...NH roads were not designed for this volume of traffic.  Would that be too crowded for you?
Well, in the county I live in there are an average of 10 people per square mile, and thats really pushing it for me.
Baltimore is about 7,700 per square mile. Nnnnnnnn no thanks.

142
Events / Re: NHC 2016 Location
« on: June 11, 2015, 05:53:29 AM »
Looks like my first NHC will be 2017
The AHA is looking at a West Coast (2015), East Coast (2016), Mid-section (2017) cadence.

Coming to flyover country, Jim?
I'd be up for that. I've been in every state but Hawaii, Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire. But my experience in the states between Massachusetts and North Carolina was not good. Way too many people. Freaks me out!

143
All Grain Brewing / Re: Using Mint
« on: June 11, 2015, 05:37:52 AM »
I guess it depends on if the OP is trying to clone Steam, or enter a Cal Common in a contest, or just have fun with a beer.

Personally, I find no mint in Steam either but I understand what the guidelines author was trying to say. Its just part of the problem with trying to explain certain beer characteristics by comparison to other things. Its sort of like mint, but its exactly like NB hops. 

144
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First brew, need advice.
« on: June 10, 2015, 06:34:04 PM »
We live to talk brewing here. But if you are interested you might check out howtobrew.com where a free book exists that explains most of the basics and a lot of advanced stuff too. Its put together in a step by step manner. Don't read past what you understand. In other words, read away but don't move ahead until you understand what you are reading.

Anyway, it sounds like you figured out how to read your hydrometer. Lets talk about recipe gravity numbers. When a recipe says the original gravity (OG) is 1.xxx that means that if your water volume and boil evaperation rate is right, then that is the OG you can expect. The suggested final gravity (FG) is based on what the recipe author gets with his yeast and his setup. You may or may not get that exact FG. Gravity readings will help you see if you are on track with your volume and boil off, and will help you estimate alcohol content, but the most important thing gravity readings will do is verify that your beer is actually done fermenting. The most important thing is two FG readings at least 3 days apart that are the same number. I take my FG reads a full week apart. With my sour beers I take them 6 weeks apart. You want to be certain that its done because when you go to bottle the beer, you typically add 3 pts of gravity for carbonation. If it still has 3 pts to go on its own AND you add 3 pts, you get foam rockets or beer glass grenades. Neither are fun times or tasty beer.

Welcome and ask away

145
Equipment and Software / Re: Handing down to sours
« on: June 10, 2015, 05:05:43 PM »
You're wrong for drinking sours, duh!

I wonder, have you ever tried a world-class sour beer like from Russian River, Rodenbach or Cantillon?
Off topic a bit, but here is the aftermath of Sunday's beer share with a few old friends.  It was definitely a "pucker up" day!


On topic: I think you're spot on Jim.  I did end up "handing down" my sour equipment, but it was all in great condition.  If it wasn't, I would have replaced it for sure.  I replace tubing often anyway. 

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
Wow, cool sampler. Im jealous

146
Events / Re: NHC 2016 Location
« on: June 10, 2015, 05:02:49 PM »
Looks like my first NHC will be 2017

147
I am by no means a sour beer expert, but afaik it is not recommended to make a starter from the dregs of a mixed culture (i.e. from a beer made with sacch, brett, pedio, lacto, etc.) because the different critters do all not grow at the same rate. So the ratios in the starter will be different from the ratios in the original beer.
When I get around to doing this I will do my typical method of lacto till I get down below 4 ph then instead of brett I will enjoy all but the bottom 3-4" of two or three bottles of live commercial sours that I like, and just swirl them up and pitch as is. Maybe Commons Myrtle if I can score some.

148
Equipment and Software / Re: Handing down to sours
« on: June 10, 2015, 08:24:37 AM »
You're wrong for drinking sours, duh!

I wonder, have you ever tried a world-class sour beer like from Russian River, Rodenbach or Cantillon?
Agreed. Plus,assuming all "sour" beers are nothing but super sour or super horsey is akin to saying I don't like craft beer cuz they're all 100 IBUs. There's all types and levels of those types.

149
Equipment and Software / Re: Handing down to sours
« on: June 10, 2015, 08:07:20 AM »
Right! Might thinking at this point is that sanitation is just as important regardless of beer style. So you either need separate equipment for each beer that uses that specific yeast, or you need to just be thorough with cleaning and sanitation so that it doesn't matter what beer you are making. The one slight variance to this is that some sacc strains don't do well in an acidic environment,  so if you are doing a lacto/pedio beer, you might not have to worry about a couple dozen sacc strains sneaking in.

1. Regardless of beer style, sanitation is vital. Don't assume that sour beers can be properly handled in just whatever

2. If you have solid sanitation you don't need separate gear

150
I think I would only do sour beer bottle dregs. They would be much more lively than sacc dregs, and it just doesn't seem that necessary with all the available sacc strains.
This is a good point but its fun to do and in my opinion something a home brewer might do just because they can.
No doubt.

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