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Messages - klickitat jim

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826
There's a way around this. Surroud yourself with people who have 3 times the talent, knowledge and energy.

827
They say to take your estimated expenses and multiply it by 3. I think you should also take your estimated talent, knowledge, and energy and multiply it by 3.

828
Ingredients / Re: First Pils
« on: March 03, 2016, 05:16:03 PM »
Ok I'll skip the dry hop. I never do it anyway. Was just a thought

829
This applies at some level. I recall Arnold Palmer years ago in an interview said that anyone can become a professional golfer, all you have to do is hit 2-3 thousand golf balls per day for ten years. I used to love golf. I even got a one day a week gig marshaling to pay my greens fees. I golfed 36 holes twice a week. So I was at the club 3 days a week. Every one of those 3 days would start with 2 large buckets. I did that for about 3 years. Thats roughly 900 strokes a week. Just shy of half of what Arnie recommend every day... I plaid by the rules and had a PGA registered handicap of 11 after all that. One day in a tournament I finished the front 9 one under without handicap. That gets your mind whirling! I finished 10 over LOL! Dream crushed.

Back to brewing... it takes way more than a dream to be a successful upstart brewery owner/operator. Aside from all the things already mentioned, it takes crazy levels of obsession. I love brewing, but not that much.

I knew a guy a long time ago that everyone said was the best they had seen, and had golfed at a high level in college. He started on the pro circuit for a while, and said when you had to make a put for big $, it became a mental game, and he couldn't do it. He said the pressure was too much for his personality.
Ya I hear that for sure.

The underlying point is applicable to this going pro thread. When you have an 11 golf handicap, that means on average you bogey 11 holes and par 7. Occasionally you birdey a hole and double bogey one. Its bound to happen one day when the stars align that you put 8 pars and a birdey down on one side. Its easy to think "wow, if I do that again on the back nine, I could go pro!" If you did that routinely without effort, even when you don't feel good, and 12,000 people are watching, and 5 camera crews, and there's a million dollars on the line... sure!

My point is, thats how many dreamer home brewers think. "Wow! My mom likes my beer and I got a medal on one beer at NHC! If my mom likes it, maybe everyone's mom will like it. And I'm clearly a medal winning brewer, so I'm basically Jamil and Gordon all rolled it one! Plus, I usually don't bounce checks, so I've got the accounting part down pat"

830
This applies at some level. I recall Arnold Palmer years ago in an interview said that anyone can become a professional golfer, all you have to do is hit 2-3 thousand golf balls per day for ten years. I used to love golf. I even got a one day a week gig marshaling to pay my greens fees. I golfed 36 holes twice a week. So I was at the club 3 days a week. Every one of those 3 days would start with 2 large buckets. I did that for about 3 years. Thats roughly 900 strokes a week. Just shy of half of what Arnie recommend every day... I plaid by the rules and had a PGA registered handicap of 11 after all that. One day in a tournament I finished the front 9 one under without handicap. That gets your mind whirling! I finished 10 over LOL! Dream crushed.

Back to brewing... it takes way more than a dream to be a successful upstart brewery owner/operator. Aside from all the things already mentioned, it takes crazy levels of obsession. I love brewing, but not that much.

831
All Things Food / Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
« on: March 03, 2016, 02:40:04 PM »
I just happen to prefer romas and the ones at the grocer are bigger but not as tasty. They work well in the cuisine here but I mainly make a base unseasoned tomato sauce for freezing and consumption throughout the year. Ketchup also is pretty easy to make with the odds and ends and slightly reject specimens.

Grew some heirloom in 2013. Pretty substantial crop. They produced right up to the freeze. It's a good idea- might do a plant or so this year.

Found it's only really worth growing what'll get used. Tomatoes, onion, carrots, peppers, broccoli, and greens like mustard or collard. Going to try potoatoes. The first year I grew radishes. I don't really care for them and they all went to waste.

On a side note: I gave one a my friends a couple of my indeterminate roma plants last spring and they have managed to survive our very mild winter and a northern exposure. Still producing fruit.
Potatoes... our soil here is what they call "peanut butter" its so muddy in winter and rock hard in summer. So it takes some conditioning. A trick we've been using is to dig 2cf holes in the rows that need more loam, then we fill the holes with miracle grow potting soil, we plant taters in that. They do wicked awesome. Then the next year all that potting soil gets tilled in and we move to the next row... its a great way to keep the garden conditioned, rotating, and grow killer taters all at the same time.

832
General Homebrew Discussion / Hop growing
« on: March 03, 2016, 02:21:06 AM »
Just FYI James Spencer has a great recent podcast about Hop Growing. Worth it if you grow hops. Go to Basic Brewing and check it out.

833
Ingredients / Re: First Pils
« on: March 03, 2016, 01:19:41 AM »
Cool Eric, sounds like I'm tracking right. Thanks

834
Doober

835
Ingredients / Re: First Pils
« on: March 02, 2016, 09:26:37 PM »
Next brew day is lagers again. Probably last of the season. One will be my German Exportbier, and I'm just looking for something fun and new to go next to it. I'll just go for it and see what happens

836
Denny, I have the results of my Olive Oil experiment already. Admittedly, I altered the process a little bit. Instead of brewing a control beer with no aeration and normal yeast, and a test beer with no aeration and olive oiled yeast, I just didnt brew at all. I then placed three identical clear plastic cups in a row. Two of them had no control beer in them, and the third had no test beer. My tasting pannel was my dog because my wife had gone to work. I had to interpret the results to some degree, but I'm fairly convinced they will prove accurate. My findings were 1. The tasting pannel just kind of looks at you as though to say "Really?" 2. As near as I can tell, the tasting pannel found no discernible difference between the two.

Summary, olive oil doesn't do anything
I suspect the rest of the findings will mirror my own.


837
Ingredients / First Pils
« on: March 02, 2016, 08:21:44 PM »
Im going to take a swing at a pils. Im not really trying too hard to nail the guidelines, not trying to IT the heck out of... it. Moderate bitterness and lots of hop flavor and aroma is what im shooting for.

5%
95% Best Pils
5% CaraPils
Mashed low and long
Will build my water, CaSO4 mostly
German Magnum at 60 for about 25 IBUs
40g Sapfir and 40g Tettnanger 170/30
40g Saphir and 40g Tettnanger dry hop 4 days once I hit TG and no D
Then I'm crashing and gell fining.

Anyone ever wirlpool or dry hop a pils?

838
Ingredients / Re: Cashmere
« on: March 02, 2016, 04:13:56 PM »
Am I the only one who now has Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir" playing in their head?  Sorry. I got nothing to add.

I went directly to sweaters, myself.
The song.  That's the only reason I opened this thread.  Such a strange syncopation.
Spicolli crusing in the Transam!

839
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 2016 Spring Swap - Official Thread
« on: March 02, 2016, 01:46:46 PM »
Awesome!

840
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Another generous home brewer!
« on: March 02, 2016, 01:42:44 PM »
Night shift...

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