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Messages - bluesman

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8056
Ingredients / Re: Vanilla Bean
« on: December 09, 2009, 03:00:15 PM »
I bought my vanilla beans from Penzey's, three per tube for about $7-8. I follow Denny's regimen and it works well for me.

8057
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« on: December 09, 2009, 02:55:20 PM »
It's Mallard reactions that are dominant in the kettle. Like caramelization, it's a form of non-enzymatic browning that is acheived.

There is not enough heat in the kettle for classic caramelization.

The process of caramelization starts with the melting of the sugar at high temperatures, followed by foaming or boiling. At this stage saccharose (sugar) decomposes into glucose and fructose. This is followed by a condensation step, in which the individual sugars lose water and react with each other. In other words it's the breaking down of sugar.

8058
All Grain Brewing / Re: Ever replace the SS braid in your mashtun?
« on: December 09, 2009, 12:40:49 PM »
I recently replaced my braid with a 24". I use it in a Coleman Ultimate Extreme 58qt mash tun. Works great.

I don't think I've ever quoted myself...but there's a first time for everything. I just damaged the new braid I installed and need to  replace it. That's the only thing I don't like about the braid. It's very fragile. But it works great.  8)

8059
All Grain Brewing / Re: Lambics
« on: December 09, 2009, 10:48:20 AM »
If we are going to get specific about it, can you really brew a California Common in NC?

Plus it goes against the premise of inovation. Should we always brew inside the box? I don't think so. Unless one is competing.


8060
Beer Recipes / Re: Hibernation Old Ale now with Recipe
« on: December 09, 2009, 10:26:52 AM »
I would do a long secondary.  8)

how long do you recommend?  I was thinking 3-4 week primary (however long it takes) then a 3 month secondary, throwing the dryhops in the last 2 weeks and then bottle.



3 months would be good.

8061
Ingredients / Re: Citra Hops
« on: December 09, 2009, 09:58:12 AM »
Well if you don't chicken out...let us know how they worked out.  8)

8062
Beer Recipes / Re: Hibernation Old Ale now with Recipe
« on: December 09, 2009, 09:54:35 AM »
I'd drink it!  :)

+1

Looks very nice!

I would do a long secondary.  8)

8063
The Pub / Re: Lets get to know each other!
« on: December 09, 2009, 07:01:28 AM »
I am the Quality Control Group Leader at the worlds leading manufacturer of Thermal Analysis and Rheology Instruments


  I bought a new Thermal Analysis meter the other day. The first time I analyzed some thermals, the dang probe fell off. Looks like you may have been asleep at the wheel!

If your instrument looks like this then yes, we must have fell asleep at the wheel.  ;)



Maybe Im not looking hard enough but I don't see a probe anywhere on it.   ;D

BINGO!  ;D

8064
The Pub / Re: Lets get to know each other!
« on: December 09, 2009, 04:46:34 AM »
I am the Quality Control Group Leader at the worlds leading manufacturer of Thermal Analysis and Rheology Instruments


  I bought a new Thermal Analysis meter the other day. The first time I analyzed some thermals, the dang probe fell off. Looks like you may have been asleep at the wheel!

If your instrument looks like this then yes, we must have fell asleep at the wheel.  ;)


8065
All Things Food / Re: Non stick pans
« on: December 08, 2009, 07:14:45 PM »
I suppose I could put some dandelions in my casserole dish and it would satisfy the definition.  ;D

8066
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« on: December 08, 2009, 07:11:56 PM »
I found an interesting bit of info on the science of caramelization which as we all know is the reduction and stages of water and sugar into caramel or caramelization. I still have not found any convincing data that suggests the temp of the bottom of the kettle to be much above 212F if any at all. Although I have a sneaking suspicion the bottom surface is slightly above 212F.

The following info was taken from this link.

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cookbook:Caramel

The Science of Caramel
Essentially, caramel is melted sugar. As sugar increases in temperature, it reacts in a process similar to burning that results in the creation of a wide variety of complex molecules. These molecules provide the deep, rich flavors and colors that make caramel so special.

There are two basic ways to make caramel: the dry method and the wet method. The dry method, which involves slowly heating sugar until it melts, is more difficult. The more commonly used wet method is easier and does not require any special tools.

In the wet method, granulated sugar is dissolved in water, then boiled until the water starts to evaporate. As the water escapes, the solution passes through a series of stages that indicates the ratio of water and sugar. This ratio is directly proportionate to the temperature so if you understand the stages, you do not need a candy thermometer. Nevertheless, use of a thermometer minimizes the handling of the (very) hot mixture.

The stages of a sugar solution are generally described by the solution's behavior when dropped into cold water:

Thread Stage (230°F) - the solution thickens into syrupy threads when you pull a spoon out.
Soft Ball Stage (234°F) - the solution can be pressed into a soft gooey ball. Used to make soft chewy candies like taffy.
Hard Ball Stage (250°F) - the solution can be pressed into a dense, slightly malleable ball. Used to make harder chewy candies.
Soft Crack Stage (270°F) - the solution solidifies into a glass-like solid that slowly bends under light pressure.
Hard Crack Stage (300°F) - the solution solidifies into a hard glass-like solid that breaks or cracks under pressure. Used to make hard candies and brittles.
Caramel Stage (310°F) - An advanced crack stage, defined by the development of an amber color that becomes tan, brown and eventually dark brown as the temperature continues to rise. Also defined by the development of caramel flavors which becomes deeper, less sweet and more bitter as it darkens.
Burned Stage (350°F) - The sugar is completely oxidized (burned) and turns black. It is inedible.

8067
All Things Food / Re: Non stick pans
« on: December 08, 2009, 06:48:20 PM »
Eggs sauteed in a pan then folded over with other ingredients inside = omelet

Eggs with other ingredients mixed in then baked on the stove top or oven in pan or casserole = fritata


Im not really sure where casserole falls in there. I know a casserole to be an oven pan. I also know a few dishes that are called casserole, tuna, green bean etc. I dont know of any "casserole" recipes for eggs.

In my experience... when someone brings out a dish that they call casserole, do what ever you can to leave. FAST!




Here's the Wikipedia version...

Casserole
 
A casserole, from the French for "saucepan", is a large, deep pot used both in the oven and as a serving vessel. The word casserole is also used for the food cooked and served in such a vessel, with the cookware itself called a "casserole dish". In British English, this type of dish is frequently also called a bake, coinciding with the cooking technique used to cook casseroles.


So there you have it. Anything cooked or baked in that dish is a casserole.  ;)

8068
The Pub / Re: Getting ready to grill/smoke
« on: December 08, 2009, 02:29:57 PM »
Now that is a beauty!

+!  one of my favorites as well.  8)

8069
The Pub / Re: 29 years
« on: December 08, 2009, 11:43:16 AM »
+1

That was a very sad day.

8070
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Kettle Caramelization for a Wee Heavy
« on: December 08, 2009, 11:11:44 AM »
My money's on 212°F.  ;D
I'll take that action!

Thanks for posting the temps blues. I researched this long ago when Randy Mosher pointed it out to me. All we see in the boil is darkening which can lead to caramel flavors, but it is not caramelization, it is maillard reactions until the water is gone.
But when you are boiling only a gallon, the water will evaporate and then the caramelization begins at about 320F (not at 212F). Heck I can't even get my regular wort to boil at 212 (at a mile high it boils around 203F  ;) ).

Don't quote me on this but I believe that there is some caramelization that occurs in the kettle. As the wort thickens to a syrup type consistently it caramelizes through condensation reactions.

As Wikipedia explains:

"A condensation reaction is a chemical reaction in which two molecules or moieties (functional groups) combine to form one single molecule, together with the loss of a small molecule.[1] When this small molecule is water, it is known as a dehydration reaction; other possible small molecules lost are hydrogen chloride, methanol, or acetic acid. The word "condensation" suggests a process in which something is lost; for reactions a small molecule is lost."

"When two separate molecules react, the condensation is termed intermolecular. A simple example is the condensation of two amino acids to form the peptide bond characteristic of proteins. This reaction example is the opposite of hydrolysis, which splits a chemical entity into two parts through the action of the polar water molecule, which itself splits into hydroxide and hydrogen ions."

The bottom line is that this process is still today poorly understood and the jury is still out on this.



 

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