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Messages - bluesman

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8341
Equipment and Software / Re: How do you chill your wort?
« on: November 10, 2009, 08:55:41 AM »
Blatz - 80 degree ground water  :o

Wow that is warm water. I guess it's the region you reside in.  :-\

Whereabouts in Florida do you live?

8342
All Grain Brewing / Re: Malt conditioning rocks
« on: November 10, 2009, 08:52:55 AM »
FWIW. The Maltmill factory setting is .040"

8343
Kegging and Bottling / Re: pressure question
« on: November 10, 2009, 06:49:16 AM »
i would assume you could also age beer uncarbonated [maybe with a few psi just to keep the seals on the keg tight].

I usually age my beers in the keg uncarbonated (puged w/CO2). Although I don't know if there's any difference aging carbonated or not.

This is the way that works for me.  8)

8344
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottling from Kegs.
« on: November 10, 2009, 06:44:19 AM »
Oxidation may be either a blessing or a curse, usually a curse, depending on the style and strength of the beer.

I like bottling from the "beer gun" because you purge with CO2 before you bottle.

Fred


I have the Blichmann Beer gun, but I haven't gotten around to using it. I need to try that for the next comp. That should also help reduce oxidation.

8345
All Grain Brewing / Re: Malt conditioning rocks
« on: November 10, 2009, 05:59:32 AM »
Are you having any issues with using rice hulls?

8346
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottling from Kegs.
« on: November 10, 2009, 05:58:18 AM »
I had a judge note a sherry aroma in a beer that I entered in the NHC. From what I'm told, this can occur from oxidation. I bottled that beer from a keg. I guess it's really hard to quantify it. I think oxidation is occurring, but to what extent I don't know. I try to minimize oxidation as much as I can during racking and such.

8347
All Things Food / Re: Post your chili recipes
« on: November 10, 2009, 05:40:42 AM »
I love the habanero flavor...but definitely don't care for the burning ring of fire either. I like to use a blend of peppers in my chili. Layering of pepper flavors, while still acheiving a balance with the meat and other ingredients is always a challenge. I'll post one of my recipes.

8348
All Things Food / Re: Comfort Food
« on: November 09, 2009, 08:33:28 PM »
Now thats stick to your ribs good eatin' there Capp. I make the same dish using Jeff Smith's noodle recipe. I roll out the dough and cut the dumplings with a pizza cutter. My wife loves C & D. It's always a winner in my house. Nice job!

8349
All Grain Brewing / Re: What kind of mash tun do you use?
« on: November 09, 2009, 08:17:42 PM »
This is beauty. Mash tun at Rathaus Brauerei Restaurant, Luzern, Switzerland.


8350
All Things Food / Re: BBQ Style
« on: November 09, 2009, 03:07:51 PM »
Hot Diggity Dogg!

Looks fantastic!

Pit BBQ is awesome. I love watching the competitions. It takes alot of failures to get to the top of the pack with the best pit bosses. Just like brewing beer...it's trial and error until things begin to come together.

8351
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Weaze's "So Long" post deleted.
« on: November 09, 2009, 12:45:40 PM »
Have a beer on me man.  8)

8352
All Things Food / Re: BBQ Style
« on: November 09, 2009, 12:44:25 PM »
Here's the BBQ guru Steven Raichlen's KC style BBQ Sauce recipe. I give it the bluesman's twist by adding some New Mexico chili powder to it. A fantastic all- around grilling sauce. Slather it on anythiing form babybacks to burgers.

Basic Barbecue Sauce Recipe
This is the type of sauce that most people in the United States think of as barbecue sauce: Brown sugar and molasses make it sweet; liquid smoke makes it smoky--there isn't a Kansas City pit boss around who wouldn't recognize it as local. Slather it on ribs and chicken, spoon it over pork shoulder, and serve it with anything else you may fancy. You won't be disappointed.

Makes about 2-1/2 cups


2 cups ketchup
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons prepared mustard
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 tablespoon of your favorite barbecue rub
2 teaspoons liquid smoke
1/2 teaspoon black pepper


Combine all the ingredients in a nonreactive saucepan and bring slowly to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and gently simmer the sauce until dark, thick, and richly flavored, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the sauce to clean (or even sterile) jars and store in the refrigerator. It will keep for several months.


8353
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Weaze's "So Long" post deleted.
« on: November 09, 2009, 12:37:00 PM »
Hey Denny...I see you are officially a full member of the board now.  ;D

Congrats!

8354
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Weaze's "So Long" post deleted.
« on: November 09, 2009, 12:34:45 PM »
OK.

But, it lives on in our hearts.

Still, I made ya look. :P

Man...don't do that.

I just had to peek.  8)

8355
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Hennipen
« on: November 09, 2009, 10:59:37 AM »
I had this beer for the first time this past summer and really liked it.

Nicely balanced. Slightly fruity. Nice frothy head. Thirst quenching.

Here's a good look at it.

http://www.ommegang.com/index.php?mcat=1&scat=3&yr=1

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