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Messages - MDixon

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841
I'd suggest a pound or 10% (whichever is less) for your first venture.

842
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cascadia Dark Ale (Black IPA)
« on: June 29, 2010, 04:41:53 AM »
I forgot where I read that at this years GABF in September the Black IPA category will be one that pro brewers can enter into.  It would be nice if we here on this homebrew community forum could have access to the new Black IPA style guidelines they will be judged by.  Maybe they're available some where and I just haven't looked hard enough.

This was amazingly difficult to find, it took a gazillion clicks and pages to get to:
http://www.greatamericanbeerfestival.com/brewers_2010/beer_styles.html

Quote
58. American-Style India Black Ale

American-style India black ale has medium high to high hop bitterness, flavor and aroma with medium-high alcohol content, balanced with a medium body. The style is further characterized by a moderate degree of caramel malt character and medium to strong dark roasted malt flavor and aroma. High astringency and high degree of burnt roast malt character should be absent. Fruity, floral and herbal character from hops of all origins may contribute to aroma and flavor.
Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.056-1.075 (14-18.2 °Plato) • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.012-1.018 (3-4.5 °Plato) • Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 5-6% (6 -7.5%) • Bitterness (IBU) 50-70 • Color SRM (EBC) 25+ (50+ EBC)

843
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Epoxy Mixers in the Dip Tube ?
« on: June 25, 2010, 11:32:01 AM »
I've pretty much always calculated using 2psi/ft, but Micromatic states it is 3psi/ft http://www.micromatic.com/direct-draw-draft-beer-system-aid-121.html and the Brewer's Association (read as AHA) states the same http://draughtquality.org/f/ch5.pdf

Personally I've seen all sorts of numbers, 2 is certainly safe and a number I've used in the past...

844
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Epoxy Mixers in the Dip Tube ?
« on: June 25, 2010, 04:33:25 AM »
The resistance value of 3/16" is ~3psi/ft, simply divide the pressure by that value and it will yield the approx length of hose required to balance the system.

845
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Epoxy Mixers in the Dip Tube ?
« on: June 24, 2010, 03:17:29 PM »
Maybe third time's the charm... ;)
Your line is too long

1 - keg needs to be properly chilled and fully carbonated
2 - set the pressure to dispense at the carbonation pressure
3 - set the line length to the pressure

25psi = 8-9' of 3/16" beer dispensing hose

My suggestion -
1 - chill the beer to 43F
2 - carbonate to 25psi (if that is the desired level)
3 - dispense at 25psi (if that is where you carbonated to)
4 - remove the epoxy thingamajig and set the line length to what it should be


847
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Epoxy Mixers in the Dip Tube ?
« on: June 23, 2010, 04:41:23 PM »
Your line is too long!

Water has no reason/ability to foam.

848
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Epoxy Mixers in the Dip Tube ?
« on: June 23, 2010, 03:25:57 PM »
If you are not balanced (too short or too long) then you can get foam.

I'd suggest you know with 100% certainty the keg is carbonated to 25psi and then serve at 25psi with 3/16" beer dispensing hose and you should need in the neighborhood of 8-9' of hose.

Sounds like you definitely have too much hose for either the epoxy doohicky or just using hose.

849
Beer Travel / Re: Beer in France
« on: June 22, 2010, 03:47:56 PM »
Dunno if you can still get it or not, but The Beers of France by Rigley and Woods is what you need.
http://www.artisanpress.u-net.com/France/frbook.html

Play around on their website, I found this by clicking a few links:
http://www.artisanpress.u-net.com/France/frbrewer.html

850
Do a search for Dr. Beer on the internet - Jay Hersch IIRC.

The BJCP will soon have kits available for members to purchase at a subsidized rate of $50, also IIRC  ;D

851
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Are all Corny Kegs the same size?
« on: June 22, 2010, 03:33:19 PM »
I'm pretty sure not every pin lock lid has a pressure relief valve (though most do). Take this one for instance (not my photo)

852
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Sharing beers at the NHC
« on: June 22, 2010, 04:33:18 AM »
If you want to really get interesting, Stan H had a good talk on the change in ester and phenol production the Trappist and German breweries were finding when changing the geometry and other attributes (open vs closed) of their fermenters.

853
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Are all Corny Kegs the same size?
« on: June 22, 2010, 04:28:59 AM »
The only reason to not select pins is they often will not have a vent in the lid. Other than that, a mixed system is no issue, just change the disconnects when using pins.

854
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Sterilizing kegs
« on: June 21, 2010, 01:31:31 PM »
I once researched it long ago (2001) and came up with a 10 min contact time with 200ppm bleach (FWIW - 1/2 tbsp should be 100 ppm).

I checked Palmer and he does suggest 20min, so I decided to do a little research and came up with a link on food surfaces from Auburn. The USDA suggests no less than 50ppm and no more than 200ppm. Water should be 105-120F and remain in contact from 1-5 minutes and anything less than 200ppm is supposedly a no rinse concentration, but we all pretty much know the bleach smell is a no no. Further it says, "However, chlorine sanitizers can corrode equipment and should not be in contact with stainless steel surfaces for more than 30 minutes."
http://www.ag.auburn.edu/poul/virtuallibrary/mckeeeffectivechlorine.html

So my answer of 100ppm and a few minutes was initially wrong, but now is miraculously validated  ;D

More miraculous validation, if anyone still cares...
http://nrckids.org/CFOC/PDFVersion/Appendix%20I.pdf
http://www.factsaboutbleach.com/bleach_public_health.html
http://www.charmeck.org/Departments/Health+Department/Environmental+Health/Educational+Info/Brochures/chlorinesanitizer.htm


855
Events / Re: Huh?
« on: June 21, 2010, 10:05:13 AM »
Judges generally get little to no information on entries with the exception of the category where it is entered. In certain categories the entrant is REQUIRED to submit some information, but that is only in a handful of categories.

Prices can range from inexpensive to expensive for any number of reasons. Perhaps it is the only fundraiser for the club so they charge $8, perhaps the club doesn't need much money and wants to drive up entries so they charge $4. Our club would like fewer entries so we tend to charge a lower price for the first few entries and as the entry count increases so do the charges. In 2009 I think we were $6 for 1-5 entries, then it jumped to $8 for 6-9, and $10 for 10 and over. People didn't get the point so in 2010 we did $6 for 1-4 entries, then $10 for 5 and over. That left a sour taste in many people's mouth thinking we were gouging so next year we are currently discussing $4 for 1-5 entries and $15 for 6 and over. We need ~$4-$5 to break even and are trying to drop our entries from the 441 we had in 2007. We had 424 in 2008, 441 in 2009 and got back to 343 in 2010. Our goal is 300 or less and to keep the entries low we had to drop meads and ciders in 2009 and 2010 which normally brought in another 100 entries.

Back to the original question about number of entries per brewer, I am unsure why any comp other than the AHA would need more than 3 bottles. The AHA needs 1 initially and 3 later. In reality on some categories they should require 2 initially and 3 later.

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