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Messages - scottNU

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76
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash Efficiency Problem
« on: August 19, 2013, 04:38:48 PM »
Yes, about 70-85% efficiency is all pretty normal, and anywhere in that range would be what I would consider to be a good balance between flavor and not wasting too much money.  If your efficiency is in the 50s or 60s... that kind of sucks as you're wasting money, but on the other hand, you'll make awesomely malty beer that way.  "They" say that the lower your efficiency, the more malty the beer can be.  For instance, if you do a no-sparge beer, you might only get 55% efficiency, but dang that beer tastes nice and malty because you're essentially making the beer out of nothing but first runnings.  You're not watering down with a lot of sparge/rinse water that needs a long boil to be concentrated.  Nope.  Just first runnings.  So yeah, efficiency sucks, but yum.... So that's kind of where I got my theory from for the other way around.  I can achieve 95% efficiency, but this requires a really hard crush and a lot of sparging.  So, you're getting more sugar out of less grain.  So, since you're using less grain, you get less grainy flavors.  That's the theory.  To date and to my knowledge, no one has bothered to prove it right or wrong.  I need to run more experiments.  Eventually.  Maybe.

Thanks for the thoughtful answer!

77
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash Efficiency Problem
« on: August 19, 2013, 11:29:09 AM »
On the other hand.... I also have a theory that too great of an efficiency can adversely affect malt flavor. 

Interesting!  I see there may be a practical and reason to limit high efficiency.  Other than using more grain (and spending some more $$), is there a similar argument on the low end?  For example, if you are not at XX% efficiency, you don't develop a certain flavor or head retention characteristic? 

I know that this is a YMMV-thing, but is a range of 70% - 80% considered normal efficiency? 

78
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash Efficiency Problem
« on: August 19, 2013, 10:03:25 AM »
I have never used rice hulls. I won't say that I have never had a stuck runoff, I have for sure but I stir it up and re-vorlauf. Adds maybe 15 minutes to the brew day, 20 when I did an all wheat ale. I had to stir and restart that one about 3 times. gotta love the cheap and easy batch sparge system.

I have been brewing with 50%+/- flaked grain lately and I don't even get a stuck runoff every time. maybe every other time.

I had also never used rice hulls in my previous batches.  During the last dunkelweizen I brewed, I decided to give it a shot.  I added 0.5 lb of rice hulls. The grist was 50%+ wheat.  It is hard to quantify the improvement, but I didn't have any stuck runoff with the batch. 

I spent about $0.75 for the rice hulls, so cost wasn't a big deal. The only thing I really didn't like was that the rice hulls made the spent grains hard to "chew on".  I like to taste the grist after the sparge is completed - it's dumb, but helps me recognize differences from batch to batch.

79
I read the thread title and thought, what hospital serves beer in the ER ?

I think I like the idea of a cash bar, serving craft beer, at places where a long wait is expected.  The DMV, Target and the grocery store checkout on a Saturday morning would be good choices
Lots of grocery stores in France have full service bars, it seems to make the wife shop faster.

That truly sounds awesome! I want the continental life!

80
I read the thread title and thought, what hospital serves beer in the ER ?

I think I like the idea of a cash bar, serving craft beer, at places where a long wait is expected.  The DMV, Target and the grocery store checkout on a Saturday morning would be good choices

81
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Am I being impatient?
« on: August 16, 2013, 07:27:58 AM »
That's a great resource but raised another question. I have read many people keep the Co2 tank in the kegerator but this guide states that should not be done with no reason listed as to why? So why is this not recommended? Mine is inside, does it really matter?

Because you can fit more kegs in the kegerator if you don't store the co2 bottle in it ;). At least that's my reason!

Yea, I get that but in my case it would only allow me a 3 gallon keg so not really a big deal, the article though made it seem like it was a bad idea to keep it inside as in detrimental but no reason why was provided so I am curious.

I think there is a bit of science and a bit of experience at work.  The ideal gas law, PV=nRT, states that as temperature goes down (T), then the pressure (P) of the system (the CO2 tank) also must go down assuming volume (V) and amount of gas (n) are kept constant.  That's the first item. 

The second item is experience.  I have heard people express concern about tank and regulator seals not working as well at lower temperatures, problems with freezing due to rapid dispensing and keg space being used by the tank. 

I keep my tank in the refrigerator and have no complaints.  I think you can do whatever works best for you and your system/set-up.

82
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cooling my all grain wort
« on: August 15, 2013, 04:01:06 PM »
A wort chiller is something you will use on every batch you brew - extract, BIAB, partial mash and AG. I think this is a good investment and worthy of your money.

83
Beer Recipes / Re: Dunkelweizen Recipe
« on: August 15, 2013, 03:56:17 PM »
I brewed a Dunkelweizen last week with a very similar grain bill. I used Hallertau instead of Magnum and the Bavarian Wheat Blend yeast (3056) instead of 3068. Mine looked, smelled and tasted pretty good. I'm not patiently waiting to keg.

Good luck with yours. I'd love to hear about yours and compare some notes. Good luck.

84
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dark colored starter
« on: August 15, 2013, 02:23:03 PM »
I'd say do it again. I'd rather start over early in the process (with minimal time and cost) than have to try and manage around a bad batch in the primary or worse yet, the keg.

85
All Grain Brewing / Re: Who's Brewing Today? s
« on: August 14, 2013, 09:06:10 PM »
Quote
Hydraulic - is there something about a rye beer that really shows the benefit of good water chemistry?
I really like the pungent rye flavor in many beers.  I am not so sure water amendment does much to accentuate rye tastes but it does wonders for the hops and the malt.  I look for the hop burst.  The flavors and aroma are much better.

I see. Thanks.

86
All Grain Brewing / Re: Who's Brewing Today? s
« on: August 14, 2013, 06:17:12 PM »
Brewed another 5 gal batch of a rye IPA, yawn!  I really love this stuff especially after working with Bru'n Water.

Hydraulic - is there something about a rye beer that really shows the benefit of good water chemistry?

87
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale Recipe Critique
« on: August 14, 2013, 05:36:41 PM »
I got her really enjoying stouts, porters, and reds though... Miller lite now tastes like piss... So it's not a complete failure... She now considers herself a beer snob lol... Just nota hop snip haha
I'd settle for my wife liking stouts, porters, and reds in a heartbeat. That's what turned me into a damn fruit beer expert! The only non-fruit beers she'll drink are weizen, wit, and maybe saison. Baby steps !

That's the truth! Baby steps are progress. I never mind making up a batch for her taste as undoubtedly there will be some BMC drinkers that wander by and benefit from a palate opening experience. Good luck!

88
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale Recipe Critique
« on: August 14, 2013, 02:54:34 PM »
If it were for me, I would up the hops. The old lady isn't a huge fan of hops... Hence the reason why I'm not brewing her an IPA lol. I did have the Mt Hood and Willamette additions at .75 oz, but I kicked them down because I have a handful of each of those growing on the vine that I plan on throwing in. I will be rebrewing an imperial hoppy red for myself he soon for the fall. I made one late winter that was finished Simcoe and Amarillo... I didn't like the Amarillo... My go with Cents instead

Does she not like the bitterness of hops, the aroma or both?  My wife also has expressed some "concern" about my unhealthy love of cones, but I've found she finds the bitterness most objectionable.  I recently brewed an IPA and moved most of the hops to flameout and dry hopping.  She claimed it was a big improvement.  Perhaps this is an option for you as well.

"I don't know how you drink that! It tastes like dish soap!"

Ah, I see. That may be a bit more problematic.

89
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale Recipe Critique
« on: August 14, 2013, 01:39:36 PM »
If it were for me, I would up the hops. The old lady isn't a huge fan of hops... Hence the reason why I'm not brewing her an IPA lol. I did have the Mt Hood and Willamette additions at .75 oz, but I kicked them down because I have a handful of each of those growing on the vine that I plan on throwing in. I will be rebrewing an imperial hoppy red for myself he soon for the fall. I made one late winter that was finished Simcoe and Amarillo... I didn't like the Amarillo... My go with Cents instead

Does she not like the bitterness of hops, the aroma or both?  My wife also has expressed some "concern" about my unhealthy love of cones, but I've found she finds the bitterness most objectionable.  I recently brewed an IPA and moved most of the hops to flameout and dry hopping.  She claimed it was a big improvement.  Perhaps this is an option for you as well.

90
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Be afraid, be very afraid
« on: August 14, 2013, 01:30:27 PM »
You do have to carb it yourself, though.

Maybe they should include a small amount of pop rocks that you can pour in after you add your water...instant carbonation!!


You need to contact the US Patent and Trademark Office on that recommendation!  Anything with pop rocks goes to the top of the list.

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