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Messages - redbeerman

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1096
All Things Food / Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
« on: May 08, 2012, 09:24:08 AM »
Wow...harvesting onions?   8)

Here, the ones that came up from last year are sending flowers. ???


I planted some things this weekend.  Tomatoes, cabbage, broccoli, leeks, cukes, couple melon plants.
The garden is fresh and beautiful this time of year.

Anybody grow bok-choy?

We are trying bok choy for the first time this year.  Just put them in a few weeks ago, they seem to be doing fine.

This year we ended up with asian radishes, spicy mesclun mix, spinach, green, wax, and purple beans, beets, lemon peepers, jalapenos, red, orange, green, and yellow bells, poblanos, black crim, early girl, Arkansas traveler, cherry, sammich mater, black beauty and Italian eggplant, spaghetti squash, okra, corn and peas.  We've been eating asparagus for about five weeks now.

1097
Congrats!  It's all up from here! ;)

1098
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewing at Rogue today
« on: May 07, 2012, 09:16:31 AM »
Awesome Denny! 8)

1099
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Enjoying a Cigar on Brew Day
« on: May 04, 2012, 09:30:01 AM »
That's my idea of a relaxing day.  :)

+1

1100
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Which yeast?
« on: May 04, 2012, 09:28:53 AM »
My experience with 3711 is that it finishes dry, but has a slick mouthfeel to it, which I don't really care for.  I have used 565 and will agree it is a pain to use, but I think it makes a superior product.

1101
Beer Travel / Re: Prague/Czech Republic
« on: May 04, 2012, 05:06:26 AM »
"Recycled vegetable oil
 
Recycled vegetable oil, also termed used vegetable oil (UVO), waste vegetable oil (WVO), used cooking oil, or yellow grease (in commodities exchange), is recovered from businesses and industry that use the oil for cooking.
 
As of 2000, the United States was producing in excess of 11 billion liters (2.9 billion U.S. gallons) of recycled vegetable oil annually, mainly from industrial deep fryers in potato processing plants, snack food factories and fast food restaurants. If all those 11 billion liters could be recycled and used to replace the energy equivalent amount of petroleum (an ideal case), almost 1% of US oil consumption could be offset. Use of used vegetable oil as a direct fuel competes with some other uses of the commodity, which has effects on its price as a fuel and increases its cost as an input to the other uses as well."

Like I said before, I agree that something has to be done, and this may be viable at some point in the future, but at what cost?  The waste oil comes from production of "food" items that are non-nutritious at best and deadly at worst.  Petroleum is dirty, no doubt, and a limited resource to boot, but the technology to use other sources MORE economically is not yet in place.  I work designing and building analytical equipment that researchers are using for biomass and coal gasification resarch as well as CO2 sequestration (greenhouse gas mitigation) and hydrogen storage for fuel cells, so I am kind of close to this. ;)  I also have many years of experience in the analysis of petroleum, natural gas and pollution measurment (H2S, SO2, NOx).

Anyway, have fun in Czech, they have awesome beer there. 8)

1102
Beer Travel / Re: Prague/Czech Republic
« on: May 03, 2012, 12:19:05 PM »
In fact, availablility of the raw materials for bio-diesel is much more widespread than that of petroleum.

anyway, I'm gonna stop now before this become political.

Not if you are talking about waste vegetable oil. ;)  That is a by-product of fast food restaurants and to my knowledge, there aren't many of those in central Africa or Siberia.

1103
Beer Travel / Re: Prague/Czech Republic
« on: May 03, 2012, 11:00:00 AM »
Running on a vegetable/algae based fuel means the carbon output of my vehicle is directly offset by the crops grown to create the fuel in the first place. so assuming bio-diesel is available to you, and you place value on environmental issues it pays for itself almost immediatly.

Plus the energy to plant it, fertilize it, harvest it, process it and transport it which makes it somewhat less desirable.  Which is why ethanol is a fallacy. ;)  Still needs improvement, just as hydrogen costs more to generate that the energy it provides.  Food for thought.  I apologize for the hijack.

currently much of the bio-diesel is manufactured from used vegetable oil products so those added costs are minimized. However the associated costs for manufacture of petro-feuls aren't zero so I think this qualifies as a strawman argument don't you? sure it's not perfect but it's one moster sized chunk better. and the paralell between ethanol and bio-deisel is not appropriate as the manufacturing processes are vastly different.

The processes may be different, but both still require energy to produce.  I agree that bio-diesel may be more economical to produce than ethanol, but it depends largely upon the supply of used vegetable oils, which as euge points out (indirectly), varies widely from region to region (population dependent supply). Major metropolitan areas have an abundance of this resource, whereas rural areas do not.  We do need to get there, but it may not be in my lifetime.

1104
Beer Travel / Re: Prague/Czech Republic
« on: May 03, 2012, 10:20:53 AM »
Running on a vegetable/algae based fuel means the carbon output of my vehicle is directly offset by the crops grown to create the fuel in the first place. so assuming bio-diesel is available to you, and you place value on environmental issues it pays for itself almost immediatly.

Plus the energy to plant it, fertilize it, harvest it, process it and transport it which makes it somewhat less desirable.  Which is why ethanol is a fallacy. ;)  Still needs improvement, just as hydrogen costs more to generate that the energy it provides.  Food for thought.  I apologize for the hijack.

1105
No brewing this weekend, but I plan on playing around with a year and a half old Flanders red, blending and adjusting sourness, etc.  The Berliner Weisse that I brewed last weekend had turned my basement into a sulphur pit, but it seems to be subsiding. ::)

1106
Ingredients / Re: Wheat malt
« on: May 03, 2012, 04:41:36 AM »
From other brewers I have talked to, the consensus is that wheat malt needs to be run through the mill a number of times to get to the point where it converts well in the mash.  What I have noticed is that wheat malt is very hard and even after crushing it does not turn to powder as does barley malt.  This is most likely the reason for the lack of conversion over a normal single infusion mash schedule.  JMO and am open to other explanations.

1107
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Aging temp
« on: May 02, 2012, 05:50:41 AM »
I'd like to say I could wait 6 months but it's not likely.  I always seem to cut short times for aging or maturing my beer.  I guess I lack patience

 ;)

1108
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Barley Wine Storage
« on: May 01, 2012, 05:11:19 AM »
I have an English barleywine that is four years old and it has been aging at 60 - 65 degrees in bottles.  What oxidation may have occurred  which is minimal) is welcome.  The beer has mellowed a bit and is quite tasty.  Higher ABV beers can take the aging.

1109
Ingredients / Wheat malt
« on: April 30, 2012, 04:58:31 AM »
I have noticed that I have to practically pulverize wheat malt in order to get it to convert well.  I do not have this issue with flaked wheat.  I am wondering if it is because of the hardness of the grain.  This would make sense.  This is an observation made over the years when making German style wheat beers (this particular one was a Berliner Weisse).

1110
I enjoy IPA's from both coasts.

+1.  As far as I'm concerned it's really hard to mess up an AIPA.  They are just like pizza.  When good they are fabulous, and when bad, they are still pretty darn good.  I have to agree that East Coast are maltier with a more bitter hop balance where West Coast tend to have the hop flavor and aroma dominate with a drier finish.  Either way is equally as good for me depending upon the craving at the time.....

Dave

Oh no, not pizza too! ;D  I like IPAs period, but I have noticed that some Eastern versions are darker and have a fuller finish.  And some really do need more hops.  I find it disturbing for a beer to have "hop" in the name and be lacking in hop flavor and aroma.  You know who you are, pro brewers.

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