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Messages - brewday

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31
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Founders all day IPA
« on: November 14, 2015, 12:09:52 AM »
Crystal, Simcoe & Amarillo I believe.  I think there was a recipe in Zymurgy last year.

Edit: July/August 2014.

32
Homebrewer Bios / Re: John L. from Ontario, California
« on: November 13, 2015, 06:56:37 PM »
Thank you all. I guess part of the reason I lurked so much, is because everyone here seems so knowledgeable. It's a little intimidating. lol

Hah!  I thought the same thing.  Jump in and share your experiences - after all you are the most knowledgeable person when it comes to those.

And welcome!

33
Beer Recipes / Re: Chasing the perfect Munich Helles
« on: November 13, 2015, 05:56:37 PM »
You might want to cross reference your hopping with the tinseth formula and see if it comes up around 14-15. IIRC, tinseth and rager can sometimes be very close, sometimes not.

Drops it by ~1 IBU in Beersmith when I switch to Tinseth.  Looks to be coming from the bittering addition.

Right now I've got for 6 gallons final kettle volume:

1 oz Hm (4%) FWH
.25 oz Hm (4%) @15
.5 oz Hm (4%) @0

I use a plate chiller, so the late additions don't stay hot long - I usually get wort from the kettle to conical at pitching temp in <10 min.

But I'm absolutely open to suggestions on the hopping schedule.

I would ditch the flameout addition - you don't want the grassyness. Keep the aroma addition at 10-15 minutes.

There are several good hopping schedules for helles. Kai's Edel Hell recipe uses one from the Narziss textbook. Another nice one if you're only using one kind of hop is to add 70-80% of it at 60 minutes and 20-30% at 10 to 15 minutes. Then, scale the total hop mass to get your target IBU.

Cool.  Appreciate it.

34
Beer Recipes / Re: Chasing the perfect Munich Helles
« on: November 13, 2015, 05:48:00 PM »
At this point, if you would like I will post my last brew details, if you would like a glimpse of what I am talking about.

That would be cool.

+1

Come back!!

35
Beer Recipes / Re: Chasing the perfect Munich Helles
« on: November 13, 2015, 05:43:55 PM »
You might want to cross reference your hopping with the tinseth formula and see if it comes up around 14-15. IIRC, tinseth and rager can sometimes be very close, sometimes not.

Drops it by ~1 IBU in Beersmith when I switch to Tinseth.  Looks to be coming from the bittering addition.

Right now I've got for 6 gallons final kettle volume:

1 oz Hm (4%) FWH
.25 oz Hm (4%) @15
.5 oz Hm (4%) @0

I use a plate chiller, so the late additions don't stay hot long - I usually get wort from the kettle to conical at pitching temp in <10 min.

But I'm absolutely open to suggestions on the hopping schedule.



36
Beer Recipes / Re: Chasing the perfect Munich Helles
« on: November 13, 2015, 05:32:33 PM »
FWIW, I don't feel like Beck's has any of 'it' but I'm obviously not as attuned to 'it' as some. I will vouch for the Urquell in cans, though. Awesome stuff.

+1 to the cans.  I've had some great DAB cans recently too.

37
Beer Recipes / Re: Chasing the perfect Munich Helles
« on: November 13, 2015, 05:28:41 PM »
After keeping up with this thread the last couple of days, I'm tweaking my recipe a bit.  I still want to try the Cologne malt here, but I'm backing off a little.  I'll brew it this weekend or next.

Now, if I name the beer Ding An Sich, will I have found "It"?

-----

OG 1.048
FG 1.009
IBU 19
SRM 3.8

93% Pils
4.5% Cologne
2.5% CaraHell
(I might toss in a couple ounces of Carafoam.)

Hm/Tett throughout
100% RO, .75 tsp Calcium Chloride, 0.25 tsp Gypsum in the mash
Mash 148/158 for 60/15

WLP 833

I would get rid of the gypsum completely. Remember to adjust mash/boil pH to 5.5 and 5.1. What IBU formula are you using? If tinseth, try 14-15

You're probably right.  The Kolsch I referenced back on page 1 or 2 had one tsp CaCl2, no gypsum.  I do typically target 5.5, and I use Rager.

38
Beer Recipes / Re: Chasing the perfect Munich Helles
« on: November 13, 2015, 04:49:21 PM »
After keeping up with this thread the last couple of days, I'm tweaking my recipe a bit.  I still want to try the Cologne malt here, but I'm backing off a little.  I'll brew it this weekend or next.

Now, if I name the beer Ding An Sich, will I have found "It"?

-----

OG 1.048
FG 1.009
IBU 19
SRM 3.8

93% Pils
4.5% Cologne
2.5% CaraHell
(I might toss in a couple ounces of Carafoam.)

Hm/Tett throughout
100% RO, .75 tsp Calcium Chloride, 0.25 tsp Gypsum in the mash
Mash 148/158 for 60/15

WLP 833

39
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Ken from NW burbs of Chicago...
« on: November 12, 2015, 04:25:41 AM »
I make quite a few Czech Pilsners and Munich Helles batches and I use 100% Lake Michigan water.  I use lactic acid in the mash water to lower the pH (I add it to the water as it's heating) and also to neutralize the bicarbonate and then I would add anywhere from 2-3 grams of calcium chloride to that to boost the calcium.  The SO4 in the source water is 27 (9x3 as SO4-S) which is slightly high for something delicate and I will occasionally use 25% distilled water but it's not really necessary.  I consider Helles to be one of the more finesse beers you can make and I have made some dynamite batches of helles with 100% source water.  I will also say that when others suggested using some amount of distilled or RO water, those batches came out nicely as well but I was really looking for a way to stop lugging water around... especially if it wasn't necessary.

Your process is solid, I've done it that way too.  In fact I'm sure I've read some of your posts on other boards and learned a few things.  And from one gelatin-finer to the next, if those beers taste anywhere near as good as they look in your pics then dynamite indeed!

Homebrewing can be funny sometimes.  I use 100% RO in large part for the opposite reasons that you mention.  I don't mind lugging the water around - I keep the jugs in my trunk and fill them whenever I'm at Mariano's.  I was, however, looking for a way to stop messing with the water spreadsheets and tinkering with mash pH.  Certainly nothing wrong with those, but I just wanted an extremely simple, consistent and streamlined process on brewday.

The ah-ha moment for me was over the summer when I read through Gordon's new book.  I went all in on his approach to water and haven't looked back.  But who knows, maybe that will change again...

Cheers and again, welcome!  Beerhead. ;)

40
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Ken from NW burbs of Chicago...
« on: November 12, 2015, 03:22:39 AM »
And still do - water was a big reason SN settled on their Mills River location.  Me? I settled on 100% RO.

Welcome by the way!

So you don't use chicago water? 

Please tell me more. I'm interested as to why and what problems you encountered.

I don't mean to hi-jack Kens thread though.
I can't answer for Brewday but it's very possible that there are some who choose RO, bottled, distilled, etc. for any numbers of reasons including that they're not sure how to get the bodacious amount of chlorine out of the water (carbon filter or campden) or maybe the bicarb level has them trying to dilute as opposed to neutralize.  I was told by many, many brewers to ditch Lake Michigan water and at the very least... dilute it with distilled.  I would like to hear why someone with LM water would choose to use something else but I could see any number of reasons.

No major problems, small things really.  Mostly consistency and simplicity.  And for the record, I haven't had chlorine in my beer since my first stovetop batch!  Generally speaking Chicago water fine for brewing, but I think you really do need to at least cut most of the pale beers with RO here.

I was finding the more RO that I used, the better the beer.  And the best ones seemed to be 100% RO.  Since I was filling one 5-gallon jug anyway, might as well fill two and make better beer.

41
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Ken from NW burbs of Chicago...
« on: November 12, 2015, 02:10:04 AM »
And still do - water was a big reason SN settled on their Mills River location.  Me? I settled on 100% RO.

Welcome by the way!
That, and tax breaks, the outdoor lifestyle, and the bigger thing is the interstates that give access up and down the eastern seaboard and to the Midwest. The savings in shipping beer from CA was why they decided to build an eastern brewery, the payback on shipping savings was a bigger factor than the water.

Yikes!  You sound like a Roanokian.  :D

Fair points.  Perhaps I bought into KG's spin a bit too much.

42
Homebrewer Bios / Re: Ken from NW burbs of Chicago...
« on: November 12, 2015, 01:36:57 AM »
And still do - water was a big reason SN settled on their Mills River location.  Me? I settled on 100% RO.

Welcome by the way!

43
Kegging and Bottling / Re: No joy in kegging
« on: November 11, 2015, 05:38:55 PM »
Does your regulator require a nylon gasket when connected to the CO2 tank?  Some do, some don't.

When I first started kegging I assumed that mine did.  It didn't.  I blew through two tanks pretty quickly before I figured that out.  :o

44
Beer Recipes / Re: Commission brew/Blue Moon style beer
« on: November 10, 2015, 05:24:58 PM »
How many (lime leaves) for a 6 gallon batch to be noticed but not a leading role?

Jim, this might be helpful.  The suggestion here is 3 grams for 5 gallons.

http://www.stonebrewing.com/blog/miscellany/2004/brewing-stone-040404-vertical-epic-ale-home

Edit: This method involves making a lime leaf "tea" and adding it to the fermenter, which I believe differs from Keith's method.

45
Equipment and Software / Re: TDS Meter
« on: November 09, 2015, 11:52:09 PM »
I'm so disappointed. I followed one of Jon's links about a year ago and bought a meter but it's not blue! I feel so alienated, somebody please include me!

I think that's why they make ScotchBlue tape!

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