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Messages - BrewQwest

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31
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: May 05, 2011, 05:42:33 AM »
just curious if anyone has bothered to do a Ward's Report on the Schmidt Brewery water in St. Paul, MN. Although they no longer make beer there, they have opened the water up to the public. 1,100 foot deep well; 50 cents per gallon. pH of 6.7 but no other info given on the website: http://www.findaspring.com/schmidt-brewery-well-st-paul-mn/

32
I deplore the idea of running a mash which contains approx 50% rye..My cooler would never handle the runoff and would become stuck forever...So for my Roggenbier, I just stove top mashed 6 pounds of rye in one pot, and the 7 pounds of 'husked' grains in another. After the mash, both were run through a large strainer, those grains were then sparged with a 2 quart pyrex vessel. Those grains were then discarded and the strainer was refilled again. This process continued until both pots were empty and all the grains had been 'rinsed' in this manner.  I ended up with over 9 gallons in the kettle which was barely enough for a 90 minute boil (pilsner was one of the 'husked' malts)... Maybe you could incorporate some of this into your brewing process???  just a thought.. cheers!!

33
Received my copy as pre-ordered from the AHA site... Immediately followed your advice on the simple salt addition for the mash instead of my normal additions.. Left feedback on Amazon...thank you for a great reference book, Mr. Strong !!

34
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Where did all the dry yeast go?
« on: February 16, 2011, 10:28:29 AM »
Lo and behold I got a response from Danstar/Lallemand...  It seems their information in item 2 of the pdf file is correct.  5 billion cells per gram which is enough to innoculate 10 liters.... So it appears it does take 2 sachets for a 20 liter batch (approx 5.3 gallons)... They also said they are in the process of repackaging their yeast for the proper pitch rates.... Interesting......cheers!!

35
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: US-05...Is One Packet Enough?
« on: February 16, 2011, 10:24:24 AM »
A hectoliter is 100 liters. so 100 hectoliters = 10,000 liters so that's .01 grams per liter or .1 gram per 10 liters or 1 gram per 100 liters to hit that 5-10 million cells per milliliter.

thanks for correcting my math... I originally figured 10 grams to 10 liters which I see now was way off.... but does the correct answer of only 1 gram to 1 hectoliter (100 liters) giving 5-10 million cells per milliliter seem wierd to anybody else??? cheers!!

36
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Where did all the dry yeast go?
« on: February 14, 2011, 11:12:00 AM »
I've noticed this as well. If the lower number (that all of the manufacturers have in their fact sheets) is correct, then a packet of dry yeast has fewer cells than an XL Smack Pack or a WL Tube. If the higher number (from JZ's pitching calculator - which he says are based on counts, and old correspondence with Dr. Cone) is correct, then they have much more. I've found S05 to be very estery compared to 1056 based on what the higher number for the dry yeast cell density would suggest is a comparable pitching rate and have wondered if this was because the lower rate was correct. At the end of the day I stopped caring since if I have to use 3 times as much dry yeast as I thought I did I'm not going to use it anyway (and at the JZ recommended rate, I was not happy with it).
Thanks John, I also noticed this the last few times I used dried yeast. Lag times seem to have increased and tastes of underpitched fermentations have begun to appear. And these are on 1.045 - 1.050 OG's...This is why I began to question the yeast counts and why I bothered to consult the tech sheets. It could be that I got my hands on some bad packs but expiration date isn't until the end of 2011..  I did take Denny's advise and have emailed the appropriate individuals (for the second time) but do not expect any more of a reply than the first time.  Maybe if my last name was Conn it would carry more weight  ;D ...  cheers all !!

37
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Where did all the dry yeast go?
« on: February 14, 2011, 08:12:39 AM »
denny and others, typically what values has everyone used for a cell count on these dry yeast sachets?

38
Yeast and Fermentation / Where did all the dry yeast go?
« on: February 14, 2011, 04:51:17 AM »
I am trying to find out the yeast counts in dry yeast and math is not one of my strong points.... There is another thread which quotes Clayton Cone of Danstar Lallemand stating that each gram of the dried yeast contains 20 billion live yeast cells. First off, I find that extremely hard to believe. 20 billion in one gram? So I went onto their web site. See here for the spec sheet on their Nottingham yeast: http://www.danstaryeast.com/sites/default/files/nottingham_datasheet.pdf .. Now, Item 2 states they have more than 5 Billion cells (5 x 109 =5 billion right?) per gram but then Item 4 of that pdf file states 100 grams in 100 hectoliters gives you a density of 5 - 10 million cells per milliliter. This is much more than Item 2 states, but even this amount could be equivalently scaled to 10 grams at 10 liters (or only 2.64 gallons). Which would mean I need 20 grams for 5 gallons just to give me a max of 10 million cells per milliliter. And 10 million cells per milliliter is only good for inoculating a 10o Plato wort (figuring 1x106 x Platoo = cells per milliliter) which is roughly only 1.040 gravity. Also, if you look up SafeAles S-05 pdf sheet here: http://www.fermentis.com/FO/pdf/HB/EN/Safale_US-05_HB.pdf you will find only 6 billiion yeast cells per gram. Meaning an 11 gram sachet would only have a maximum of 66 billion yeast cells! Figuring this backwards: 66,000,000,000 / 3785ml per gal / 2.5 gal = 6.974 million cells per milliliter. Which is a proper pitch rate for only 2.5 gallons of a 7o Plato wort (approx only 1.028 gravity). Where did all the yeast go? Or am I computing something drastically wrongly here??  cheers!!

39
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: S-189 Dry Lager Yeast from Fermentis
« on: February 14, 2011, 03:30:03 AM »
It was only my 2nd lager but I threw 2 packs of this into a Standard American Style and was really pleased with the results. I pitched two packets and did a D-rest only because that's what I was told to do. My inquisitiveness on pitching the  two packs led to investigate yeast numbers in a couple of other dry sachets. But rather than hijack a thread I will start another...cheers!!

40
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: US-05...Is One Packet Enough?
« on: February 13, 2011, 12:50:04 PM »
Ok, I am a bit confused here.... Back on page 1 of this thread, The quotation by clayton cone states that each gram of the dried yeast contains 20 billion live yeast cells.  But on their own web site they quote different quantities. See here for the spec sheet on their Nottingham yeast: http://www.danstaryeast.com/sites/default/files/nottingham_datasheet.pdf
Item 2 states they have more than 5 Billion cells (5 x 109 =5 billion right) per gram but
Item 4 of that pdf file states 100 grams in 100 hectoliters gives you a density of only 5 - 10 million cells per milliliter. This could be equivalently scaled to 10 grams at 10 liters or only 2.64 gallons. Which would mean I would need 20 grams for 5 gallons just to give me a max of 10 million cells per milliliter. Furthermore, if you look up SafeAles S-05 pdf sheet, you will find only 6 billiion yeast cells per gram. Meaning a 11 gram sachet would only have a maximum of 66 billion yeast cells!! Or am I computing wrongly here... ??? Is not 6 x 109 not equal to 6 billion??

41
All Grain Brewing / Re: Using Rice in a mash
« on: January 25, 2011, 05:34:10 AM »
I use Minute Rice, which is pre gelatinzed and can go right in the tun.  I've also used wild rice and jasmine rice, both of which do need to be pre cooked.
sorry for this probably obvious question, but when using the minute rice, if a recipe calls for a half pound of flaked rice, then would a half pound of minute rice be the equivalent substitute? thanks

42
Classifieds / $60 certificates for only $30
« on: December 09, 2010, 12:31:54 PM »
Midwest supplies is offering $60 worth of brewing product for only $30.. click the following link for the details... http://steals.startribune.com/r/4d01127779f41d784c983ca3

EDIT... Note that the time limit for responding was 11:59PM Dec 09....

43
The Pub / Midwest Supplies offering $60 for $30
« on: December 09, 2010, 12:29:33 PM »
Click this link for stealing the deal of the day.. Midwest homebrew supplies certificates (limit 2) $60 in product for only $30 ....  http://steals.startribune.com/r/4d01127779f41d784c983ca3

44
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: stuck BarleyWine
« on: November 26, 2010, 10:03:38 AM »
After over 200 days in the secondary, the Barleywine's gravity was finally taken again.  It is sitting at 1.036 !!  A huge thank you to Fred and everyone else who offered support on this. Of course, the fun of taking hydro readings is tasting the sample afterwards. This tasted like a completely different beer than when I was panicky and started this thread (see above). I am now looking forward to what this tastes like when carbonated and chilled.  My beersmith software computes this to be an 11.2% beer. I would like to bottle this beer.  Do you suggest a higher alcohol tolerant yeast such as rehydrated T-58 (or something similar?) be added at bottling? Again, Fred, Denny, and all, thank you for your troubleshooting assistance on this.  Cheers!!

45
Yeast and Fermentation / WL029 yeast help
« on: November 23, 2010, 06:24:21 AM »
ok all, I need some good education on this...  I brewed up a batch of Kolsch on Friday the 19th.  For yeast I used a harvested WL029 from a light cream ale. The harvest consisted of 3 mason quart jars containing approximately 3/8 inch yeast layer in each jar. This would give me just over an inch of yeast to pitch. My intent was to ferment this at 59-60F which I had read on this forum was a great temp to ferment Kolsch at. I figured with this much yeast I could bypass the starter. The yeast was a month old. At pitching time, my wort was at 55F, my yeast was 58F. I figured this would allow the yeast and wort to come up to my planned fermentation temp. For all three jars, I decanted off until the yeast got to the mouth of the jar. This left me with just enough liquid in each jar enabling a swirl and pitch. On the morning of the 22nd, the temp of the wort was at 59F and nothing was happenning in my 30 liter carboy. The s-bubbler's liquid level hadn't budged.  I went to White Labs web site and it said this yeast needs to be in the mid 60's to optimally ferment. So I warmed it to 64F and it began taking off. I am now holding it at 65F and it's chomping away happily with a nice sized krausen on top.  How are you all able to ferment this yeast colder? Did I need to have more than an inch of yeast to do this?  At the colder temp I still should have gotten a good krausen shouldn't have I? Or should I have taken a couple liters of the wort, placed it in a flask and then added the yeast to that in order to get it going at the lower temp? Then pitch into the remainder of the wort??  As usual any and all advise is always appreciated from this group.  cheers!!
... Needed to add here that the starting gravity of the kolsch was 12.5BRIX or 1.050....

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