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Messages - dmtaylor

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1
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottling high gravity beers
« on: Today at 09:00:25 PM »
I've been bottling every batch for 19 years.  A little fresh yeast is all that needed.  Don't even need a whole pack.  I wouldn't add some to every bottle, just a little to the whole batch.  A day or two before bottling, I would add like 1/4 pack of yeast per 5 gallons directly to the fermenter, no rehydration necessary.  Then monitor to ensure fermentation doesn't take off again -- if it does, you'll want to leave it alone until inactive again.  If all seems calm, then go ahead and bottle.  This will be enough yeast to carbonate your bottles for you.

2
Homebrew Competitions / Re: Judge experience
« on: Today at 06:44:39 PM »
Most typically I find that the less experienced judges very obviously copy some of the results from higher ranked judges, and it drives me up the wall because I would prefer that each judge give me THEIR OWN impressions.  I don't care at all about consensus, whether as an entrant or as a judge myself.  If I got totally different results from two different judges, I'd be both shocked AND pleased.

I understand what you are talking about though too.  I agree that less experienced judges can have a tendency to try to show off their knowledge, even to the point of their comments becoming absurd.  Some judges detect diacetyl in every single beer they taste, whether it's actually there or not.  Some judges will say every beer is oxidized and "probably better when it was fresher".  On the other hand I also have seen a Master level judge who claimed he was able to detect astringency in the aroma.  Yeah, right.  Scoresheets like this just go straight into the recycle bin for me.

It is for many of these reasons, in part, that I enter very few competitions anymore these days.  I enjoy judging, not saying I'm perfect at it either though, but I'd really rather judge than enter.  I think I entered one a couple years ago.  Some judges do an outstanding job, but they are few and far between IMO.  One thing I can promise to anyone who receives a scoresheet from yours truly -- I actually wrote down what *I* tasted, and I didn't give a damn about what the guy sitting next to me wrote on his sheet.  What you see is what I myself actually perceived.  I sure wish more people would judge that way.

Cheers.

3
When I grew up my grandparents spoke German, served me weißbier and made me eat stollen at Christmas time.
I probably don't need to take a DNA test.

For some reason we eat kuchen every Christmas.  A couple of my great grandparents were 100% German and I think the tradition was handed down.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Personal Preference Terroir?
« on: August 12, 2018, 02:22:29 PM »
Well, based on recent DNA testing and hundreds of hours of genealogical research, I found out that I am way more a mongrel than I ever knew possible.  My heritage is exactly thus:

Ethnicity   %   Surnames in Our Family
Danish   31   Nielsen, Zink
German   23   Domann, Wegner, Kremers
English   15   Taylor
Irish      8   Dehart, McDaniel, McFarrell
Polish   6   Klug, Polzin
Swedish   6   Moline
Norse   6   Alme
Dutch   3   Koch
Jewish   1.5   Gould
French   <1   Monsieur

I have always enjoyed breakfast danishes and kringles, but then my family always knew we were Danish so that wasn't blind.  Later in life I got to appreciating German beers and sauerkraut a lot more, but again, I always knew I was German.  What I never knew is that I am Polish, Swedish, Norse, Dutch, Jewish, and French.  Hmm..... I like Polish kielbasa and Baltic porter.  Was that my roots calling back to me?  I think not.  I think those are just delicious foods.  I always loved Dutch-processed cocoa and never knew I'm Dutch.  My ancestors calling to me from beyond the grave?  No, I don't think so.  Yadda yadda...... I use the term "yadda yadda".  Is that any reflection on my Jewish ancestry?  Heh.

I enjoy talk of this stuff, but do be careful about assuming "I am this" or "I am that".  I was unaware of half my European heritage until I spent many many hundreds of hours looking up all the family history up every single string back like 7 or 8 generations if not more.  If we are all mongrels, then...... well.....

Bottom line is that instinct or genetics isn't dictating what we naturally love or hate IMO.  I think it's way more personal preference and upbringing than genetic heritage.

Cheers to you this lovely Sunday morning.

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What to do with a pre-smacked yeast pack?
« on: August 11, 2018, 10:38:27 PM »
Yes.  Use it.

6
I pitch a sufficient amount of healthy yeast and don't really aerate.

Ditto.  It splashes quite a bit going into my carboy anyway, I figure that's probably good enough.  Maybe I'm wrong.  Maybe I'm not.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: pH
« on: August 09, 2018, 11:25:49 PM »
I think the difference is so small and wonder if it really makes a discernible difference. As stated in o.p I do use a meter and it is calibrated and adjusts for temperature.

WARNING!  WARNING!  NO, it does NOT truly "adjust for temperature".  You absolutely must be cognizant of temperature effects.  Forget anything about "Automatic Temperature Correction".  It's not what you think it is.  Common misconception.  Take note!
Lets get down to brass tacts here and learn me something!!
So,auto correct aside, how do I adjust for temp manually? Slide rule?

At mash temperatures of approximately 150 F, add 0.25 to the pH.  At room temperature, add nothing.  If in between, pick a number in between.

The 0.25 number is not baloney either; it is based on a lot of real data from Kai Troester, Gordon Strong, John Palmer, Ashton Lewis, and..... me.  8)

My pH meter (milwaukee 101) came with a reference sheet indicating temps of the wort and appropriate buffer pH readings (for both 4 and 7 solutions). When calibrating, I take the temps of the solutions then turn the dial on my meter to match the solution temps prior to calibrating. I then make sure that my wort temp is the same as the reading temperature that I calibrated the pH meter with when I take my mash pH readings.

I do something similar to that too.  Good point.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: pH
« on: August 09, 2018, 09:56:13 PM »
I think the difference is so small and wonder if it really makes a discernible difference. As stated in o.p I do use a meter and it is calibrated and adjusts for temperature.

WARNING!  WARNING!  NO, it does NOT truly "adjust for temperature".  You absolutely must be cognizant of temperature effects.  Forget anything about "Automatic Temperature Correction".  It's not what you think it is.  Common misconception.  Take note!

9
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottle Gushing
« on: August 09, 2018, 09:48:13 PM »
I've been bottling every batch since 1999.  Bottled thousands.  My experience:

You most likely have excess sludge/trub in the bottom of each bottle, so when the cap is popped, this material provides "nucleation sites" for the CO2 to form, which then will gush if not immediately poured off.  Did you rack this beer to a secondary before bottling?  Was it more hazy than normal before bottling?  Did you dry hop?  Could there be coffee particles in there?  Any solids in your bottles at all can lead to this effect.

I put up with this kind of thing randomly for many years.  Only in recent years have I decided that I need to secondary in most cases to keep most of that stuff out of the bottles for a clearer and more consistently carbonated product.

If that's not it............ maybe you bottled a little too early and the yeast is still acting on the original sugars?  This has happened to me a time or two as well.

Infections are possible but unlikely if you've sanitized well and your hoses aren't really old.  All hoses should be replaced at least every 18-24 months just to be safe.

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Bottling pasteurized beer
« on: August 09, 2018, 03:17:56 PM »
Infections don't like the cold.  Maybe all you need to do is package it as normal, then as soon as it carbonates, keep it all cold.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: pH
« on: August 09, 2018, 12:13:23 PM »
Possible temperature effect?  At what temperature exactly was each measurement made?  Temperature has a significant impact on pH readings.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Think I'm going back to whole cone
« on: August 09, 2018, 12:10:46 PM »
Well peeps, I just picked up two fat sacks of some home grown. Bullion hops.

Not sure the true AA but I’m gonna make a stout with them. Oatmeal stout. If they are true to historical bullion’s I’m estimating 8-9%aa. These are dried and I was gonna use a bag @60 and the other bag at like 20 and @0

I'm happy to see you're trying them for bittering.  I think your estimate of 8-ish percent alpha is probably pretty close.  One minor concern is they don't have much brown on them, so possibly slightly underripe... but in Arizona, well maybe nevermind!  I have NO idea what they'd be like used at the end of the boil -- exciting!

Cheers!

13
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saflager 34/70 lag time
« on: August 07, 2018, 07:30:26 PM »
"Fast" lager is nothing new.

Aw, man....... but I *so* wanted to jump on the bandwagon!!   :'(   :o   ;D

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saflager 34/70 lag time
« on: August 07, 2018, 12:17:09 PM »
I've seen big bubbling krausens within ~12 hours when I used this yeast.  60 hours is very abnormal.  The OP used 2 packs (for I assume 5 gallons) which should be PLENTY.

15
Equipment and Software / Re: Bru'n Water profile for a Gose?
« on: August 03, 2018, 02:30:40 PM »
Whatever you do..... use much less salt than you think you should.  Some people like the taste of seawater.  Some don't.  You can always add more if you need to, but after it's added, you cannot subtract it.

Cheers.

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