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Messages - dmtaylor

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dried yeasts and pH
« on: Today at 03:35:52 AM »
WB-06 German hefeweizen is at pH 3.7.  It is too tart for my liking, not a horrible beer but zero clove or banana which is dumb.  It does have a slight chlorophenol, which is odd since I'm sure I used Campden, I always do, but that's the only phenol I get out of this.  Not my best hefeweizen, that's for sure.  But I remember being struck by the tartness the first time I ever tasted it, and today was no exception either.  Tart.  Can drink it, it's alright, but not a very good German hef.  So yeah, I won't be using WB-06 anymore.  But maybe for an American hefe, after second use and not fresh from a new pack of yeast, it might be okay!   ;)

2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dried yeasts and pH
« on: October 18, 2018, 03:51:52 PM »
I have been trying dried yeasts a fair bit of late, and have noticed something interesting.  The first generation fermentation finishes with an unusually low pH,  around 3.8, with (unless I'm deceiving myself and tasting what I expect to find) a predictable slight tartness in the beer.  On harvesting and repitching the yeast, subsequent generations seem to perform just like normal liquid cultures, with a finished pH of around 4.2.  Can anyone explain this?

Possible exceptions are W-34/70 and Windsor,  both quite powdery; but this may well be a red herring or just an outlier,  because I'm reporting only a nearer-normal first generation pH, having made no comparison with a repitch.

Excellent observation!!!!  I have been using mostly dried yeasts for several years now, and I have long noticed that they all seem to have the odd tartness.  I've always used fresh packs, not repitched.  I thought maybe I just didn't like dried yeast?  But if your observation is correct, then perhaps I should check pH, and perhaps we should all be making yeast starters for all dried yeasts!!!!!  Then it would always be "re-pitched", at least from the starter to the intended wort.

Fantastic.... why didn't we think of this before?!  Over the next few days I'll measure the pH of some of my finished beers, and see how they compare.  I've got several batches to choose from.  Easy enough to pull out the old pH meter (which yes, I do calibrate for EACH AND EVERY USE).

EDIT:  To answer Denny's question, I get a very peculiar tartness from WB-06 for certain.  Swore I'd never ever use that yeast again.  I still have a couple bottles of that one and will report back on exact pH reading.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Six New Beer Styles of 2018
« on: October 17, 2018, 12:14:04 AM »
But............. isn't IPA just another word for "beer", now, in the 21st century?  Isn't everything just some form of IPA?!?
College friend from New England used to crack me up:  "You want a Coke? Yeah, what kind -- Pepsi, 7Up, root beer...?"  Now I realize these are the same folks who started with the "Black IPA" and so on....  If you want a nice sessionable IPA I've got some PBR in the fridge....  But seriously, you're on to something.  The letters have nothing to do with "India," "pale," or maybe even "ale" anymore.  But we seem to be coalescing some idea of what it does mean.   And I don't think my PBR will be included.   Surely it signals a very hop forward beer, whether that means in terms of bitterness or flavor/ aroma?

Ever had McEwan's IPA?!   ;D ;D ;D ;D

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Six New Beer Styles of 2018
« on: October 16, 2018, 09:48:08 PM »
But............. isn't IPA just another word for "beer", now, in the 21st century?  Isn't everything just some form of IPA?!?

5
Brettanomyces yeast, Lactobacillus, and/or Acetobacter bacteria (and probably an assortment of other wild beasts) make Basque ciders taste like green olives.  You probably have an infection of one or more of these.

6
The Pub / Re: The future has never seemed more bleak
« on: October 15, 2018, 11:23:34 PM »
By the time 2099 hits, each of us will either be dead, or sorted by social classes into the "haves" and "have-nots".  I intend to be dead, and prior to that, one of the "haves".  My kids are bright and should be okay as well.  If they were morons, I might be a little more worried, maybe.  But of course, when we're dead we won't really care.

7
Ingredients / Re: Apples in Brown Ale
« on: October 15, 2018, 11:15:34 PM »
Anyone ever try replacing the strike water with cider?  I've done replacement with maple sap but never cider, which has a lot more sugar content.  I'm very tempted to try it on a small (1-2 gallon batch size) scale.

No, and it seems like a pretty bad idea for all-grain brewing.  I just checked the pH of my 2018 juice and it's 3.5.  Not suitable for mashing at that pH.

If brewing with extract, though, I'll bet it would turn out good.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Lager Won't Clear
« on: October 15, 2018, 11:57:36 AM »
Gelatin is very effective at removing yeast haze.  You must have something else, like a starch or protein haze.  How did you mash?  What temperature and for how long?  How was the crush?  Was it done at the LHBS?  Did you measure mash pH?

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 04:57:10 PM »
You must have mashed too hot and killed off the beta amylase quickly.  That would explain the low attenuation better than anything else.

10
You did everything right.  One thing I wonder is that since S-04 is an ale yeast, it might still be in its replication phase while getting accustomed to fermenting something not malt-based. At any rate I fully expect it will start to ferment very soon in the next 36 hours and if not, the yeast might just be bad for some unknown reason and if so then just buy some wine yeast (like Cote des Blancs), pitch that in, and everything will turn out just fine.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cider Harvest
« on: October 12, 2018, 11:22:54 AM »
Great to see somebody having the success I did in 2017.

I began with 3 trees.  One tree died of fireblight in late 2017.  This year, rose chafer beetles killed every apple on my other 2 trees.  That's how my season went!  I poisoned the chafer larvae, so hopefully 2019 is a bumper crop year!

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hops can convert starches
« on: October 11, 2018, 10:45:12 AM »
Was your Old Fashioned made with simple syrup or made with gomme syrup?

Collins Cocktail Cherry Juice and Sprite... and a splash of water because while I like my old fashioneds sweet, I don't like them cloyingly sweet nor overly whiskeyed.  I also stir the bejesus out of it so it's totally uniform.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hops can convert starches
« on: October 11, 2018, 01:52:51 AM »
^^^^
I think we can confidently posit causation,  not mere correlation.   Finally, on something.  8)

Well, it also feels better not being at work anymore, so....

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hops can convert starches
« on: October 11, 2018, 01:45:27 AM »
New drunken revelation!:  Fresh NEIPAs are hazy PRIMARILY BECAUSE....

Dry hops contain enzymes which convert unconverted complex dextrins into fermentable sugars and it keeps the yeast eating and in suspension otherwise they'd be settling out but since they're not done eating they don't.

Discuss.  Or don't.  I don't care.
Seems you're feeling better now.  Cheers!  So... Primarily?  Dunno.  In part at least?  Why the heck not.   Except that besides attenuation, the other big purpose of dry hopping back in the day was rapid clarification; but then the mechanism there is providing lots of polyphenols to complex with proteins and all settle out, which will not have gone to completion in said FRESH Knee-pah, so maybe, hmm...

Yeah... it's so VITAL to consume your NEIPA within SECONDS of it getting into the can that you need to go wait in line for 20 minutes in the NE to get the freshest stuff.  Even though it kind of sucks.  But yeah.

Yes, I feel very much better, now, thank you.  I'm trashed, not on beer but on 3 (or maybe more soon?) good old fashioned Wisconsin whiskey old fashioneds with cherry juice, yummo.  I do drink stuff other than beer on occasion.  This was one of many of those occasions.  Cheers all.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hops can convert starches
« on: October 11, 2018, 01:23:57 AM »
New drunken revelation!:  Fresh NEIPAs are hazy PRIMARILY BECAUSE....

Dry hops contain enzymes which convert unconverted complex dextrins into fermentable sugars and it keeps the yeast eating and in suspension otherwise they'd be settling out but since they're not done eating they don't.

Discuss.  Or don't.  I don't care.

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