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Messages - dmtaylor

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436
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Secondary Hop Additions
« on: November 18, 2014, 06:05:28 AM »
No but I'll design you a recipe of whatever style you like.  :)

437
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Secondary Hop Additions
« on: November 18, 2014, 05:54:13 AM »
Just add all the dry hops at once for 4 days and call it done.  There's seriously no advantage to making it any more complicated than that.

438
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Raising Ferm. temps
« on: November 18, 2014, 05:52:13 AM »
Just keep the temperature high, otherwise you risk a stall, and potential gushers.

And you don't need to dry hop any more than 4-5 days.  There is no benefit to going any longer than that.

439
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Raising Ferm. temps
« on: November 16, 2014, 09:21:08 AM »
I must confess... I'm a bubble watcher... After the fermentation has been going strong, when the airlock bubbling slows to 3-6 bubbles per minute, then warm it up.

441
All Grain Brewing / Re: Batch Sparge Grain Bill Increase
« on: November 15, 2014, 03:52:09 PM »

And try to get your first & second runnings to have equal volumes.  For example if your pre-boil volume is 7 gallons, then strive to get 3.5 gallons out of the mash and 3.5 gallons out of the sparge.  Science has proven that this will always maximize batch sparge efficiency.  Denny says it doesn't matter too much, but hey, my average efficiency is a point higher than his, so who you gonna believe?  ;)

which only proves my point!  :)

True... true.  :)

442
All Grain Brewing / Re: Batch Sparge Grain Bill Increase
« on: November 14, 2014, 09:13:41 PM »
What's your secret to 80+% efficiency. I usually get 70-ish%.

Crush well and sparge well.  Got your own mill?  That will hurt you if you don't, although you could try a double crush at your LHBS.  But if you can set your own mill tight at home, better.  You need to find the balance between crushing too light to where you efficiency suffers vs. crushing too hard to where you can't runoff or sparge very fast.  For most people the magic number is in the 80s.  My average right now is 84%.  It was higher in the past but I got worried that if it gets too high the beer might taste less grainy and more watery, due to less grain required to get the same amount of gravity.  Still need to test this theory further.

And try to get your first & second runnings to have equal volumes.  For example if your pre-boil volume is 7 gallons, then strive to get 3.5 gallons out of the mash and 3.5 gallons out of the sparge.  Science has proven that this will always maximize batch sparge efficiency.  Denny says it doesn't matter too much, but hey, my average efficiency is a point higher than his, so who you gonna believe?  ;)

443
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Mash Out Fermentability Question
« on: November 13, 2014, 08:38:20 AM »
I think I understand what you're talking about, but I'll answer from several different angles just to make sure I cover your concerns.

If you're sitting at 149-150 F for a full hour before you pull the grain bag, etc., then raising the temperature towards a boil, fast or slow, will not hurt your fermentability at all really.  If the mash sits at 149-150 F for (let's be extreme) zero minutes, you basically just get the grains wet and then immediately bring it slowly up to a boil over 20-30 minutes, then yeah, your fermentability will suck.  Any mash greater than about 40 minutes will get you good fermentability.  Quicker than that, and fermentability will suffer a bit.

Mashouts are pretty pointless for homebrewers.  There's no need to bring things up to 170 F and hold for a few minutes for a mashout, if you plan to bring the whole wort up to boiling within like 30 minutes anyway, because then the mashout comes automatically in a timely fashion as soon as the wort hits 170+ F on its way up to the boil.

If you were to leave your wort sitting at 149-150 F for a long period while you perform a sparge, etc., then your fermentability will be high without a mashout.  This comes into play for partigyle brewing where you might leave the first or second runnings to sit for an hour if you can't boil both partigyles at the same time.  In these cases, a mashout might make sense especially for the smaller beer to prevent it from becoming extremely dry and watery.

It doesn't sound to me like you are doing anything outrageous, so I think the mashout is a moot point for you.

I should say, however, that I really don't think you need to rest your sparge water for 15-30 minutes.  That's a complete waste of time.  You can do a quick dunk, then immediately <2 minutes move your sparge liquid into the boil kettle.

444
All Grain Brewing / Re: Parti-Gyle Brew - RIS & Oatmeal Stout
« on: November 13, 2014, 06:00:49 AM »
A couple of thoughts, based on my experience doing pretty much the same thing with a barleywine + porter partigyle:

You might not get as much color as you think out of your second wort, so if I were you I'd double the Black Prinz to 8 oz.

I don't think there's any need to mash the oats and black for a full hour.  15 minutes in the 150s should be sufficient to convert the starches, or if you're concerned, go 20 minutes.  And this will help also for my following recommendation...

If you want to guarantee good attenuation from your barleywine, and not such dry attenuation in your stout (with a final gravity of like 1.006 or something crazy like that!), then you could plan to boil your stout first, and let the barleywine wort sit for that couple hour period to dry out a little more.  Worked for mine.

Or I guess you could do a mashout on the barleywine while those oats are sitting in there, if you want to lock in sweetness into your barleywine.  But regardless my point is really that you want to dry out your barleywine, rather than leaving your stout to sit at mash temperatures for an extra hour to dry out this small beer even more than it already will be.  For my second-runnings porter, it was so dry that I also had to add lactose to sweeten it, even though I boiled it before the barleywine.  Something to think about.

445
Ingredients / Re: Darkening the beer
« on: November 12, 2014, 09:03:54 PM »
Sinamar is probably the best way.

Alternatively you could figure out how much D-180 Extra Dark Belgian Candi Syrup you would have to use to get your SRMs up... probably about 3/4 lb for 5 gallons or something like that.  Then from there, calculate exactly how much water to mix it with to hit exactly your original original gravity, then add it and let it ferment out.  This will impact flavor a little bit, but in nothing but a good way I would think.

446
Ingredients / Re: Another Hop Shot Post - Flavor addition??
« on: November 12, 2014, 08:59:55 PM »
I used the equivalent of 2.5 oz (however much that is) at flameout.  It works.  It is sticky though.

447
Ingredients / Re: Another Hop Shot Post - Flavor addition??
« on: November 12, 2014, 07:21:14 PM »
Yep, I've done this.  It works quite well.

448
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Back to basics - the perfect blonde
« on: November 12, 2014, 07:20:12 PM »
I'll up the rye. I was under the impression it was powerful, in terms of flavour.

Not at all powerful.  It is very mild and bready.  I would guess that ~75% of people who claim "it's spicy" have never really tasted it.  If it's "spicy", I would say no, it's more like a dry, crisp finish, but I wouldn't say spicy.  And this is a bit of a conundrum as well because while the finish is somewhat dry, while the beer is in your mouth it feels very thick, viscous, slick, heavy.  But then you swallow and this is gone.

449
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Back to basics - the perfect blonde
« on: November 12, 2014, 02:58:55 PM »
You won't be able to taste rye at just 10% of the grist.  However, it will have a huge effect on creaminess, body, and head retention at 10%.  If you want to be able to taste it then use more like 20%.

450
Beer Recipes / Re: What kind of hops
« on: November 12, 2014, 06:24:33 AM »
Hmm... how about Columbus or Centennial?

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