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Messages - dmtaylor

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436
Beer Recipes / Re: Mexican Vienna
« on: April 21, 2016, 09:18:05 AM »
Personally I don't think corn belongs in there, even if the Mexicans might not agree (I must confess I'm not sure, but don't care).

Here's my recipe that I really loved.  The following recipe got a 2nd place ribbon/medal in the 2010 BUZZ Boneyard Brew-Off.  And, I sent some to Denny (a looong time ago) and he seemed to like it.

Fiery Future Vienna
5 gallons
OG=1.051
ABV=5.2%
IBU=19
SRM=14
Eff=94% (yes, way high, adjust as necessary)

5.6 lb German Vienna
1.2 lb German Munich
6 oz Belgian CaraMunich
2 oz Chocolate malt
1.5 oz Belgian Biscuit
0.5 oz Mt. Hood (5% alpha, 60 minutes)
0.5 oz Hallertauer (4.4% alpha, 60 minutes)
0.375 oz Saaz (2.5% alpha, 10 minutes)
Wyeast 2206 Bavarian Lager

The hops were not important in this beer. I used some leftovers that I had on hand. Any continental-style hops would be fine in this beer. It's not about the hops. I triple decocted this beer, which no doubt improved the efficiency more than normal, all the way up to friggin 94%. Doughed in at 113 F (I overshot a little), pulled 1/3 of thick mash, brought to 158 F for 10 minutes, then boiled 15 minutes and added back in. Protein rested here at 120 F (and I shouldn't have) while I boiled another 1/3 thick mash for 10 minutes, added back in. Missed the mark on temperature by a huge amount so I had to use boiling water and additional heat on a burner to bring it up to 154 F for 10 minutes. In hindsight I probably should have boiled 2/3 thick mash. Then I pulled 1/3 thin mash and boiled 10 minutes, added back in. This only maintained temperature in mid 150s instead of a mashout. So I immediately ran off and started to bring up to a boil. Following are my recommended single infusion instructions, if you'd prefer to try that, along with the other general stuff. Make a 4-quart yeast starter 2-3 days in advance. Mash 150 F for 40 minutes, also use Campden to knock out chlorine. Ferment as close to 50 F as possible for 6 to 8 days, then raise up to 65 F for 2 days for diacetyl rest, then check gravity. When gravity is in low teens, crash to ice cold and lager as long as you want. Bottle with 9 Tbsp table sugar.

I need to brew this again, soon.  I just got a fresh pack of WLP830 -- good enough.  Maybe next week.

437
All Grain Brewing / Re: Boiling strike water to remove chloramine
« on: April 19, 2016, 01:35:06 PM »
That is my understanding as well.  Need to use Campden or carbon filtration to get the chloramines out, to prevent Band-Aid flavors in the final beer.

I don't think Band Aids smell like they used to anymore.  I was helping a guy out with a chlorine issue and he said Band Aids don't have a smell and sure as heck I raided the medicine cabinet and alas, no smell or at least nothing like the days when they came in the metal tins.  (I am 43)  Then he asked how I knew what they TASTED like and it was awkward...   ;D

The politically correct term these days is probably "medicine cabinet" or "hospital sanitizer".  After all, "Band-Aid" is a Registered trademark anyway, similar to Kleenex, Xerox, Google, iPhone, Trivago, Hupy & Abraham (does anyone actually use Trivago or Hupy & Abraham?!?), etc.

438
All Grain Brewing / Re: Boiling strike water to remove chloramine
« on: April 19, 2016, 11:10:51 AM »
I thought boiling removed chlorine but not chloramine.  Is that incorrect?
Correct. Brungard and AJ have posted on this many times. Basically if your water supplier treats with chloramine (and more and more do), then boiling is not effective.

That is my understanding as well.  Need to use Campden or carbon filtration to get the chloramines out, to prevent Band-Aid flavors in the final beer.

439
All Grain Brewing / Re: 55% Efficiency after Batch Sparge
« on: April 19, 2016, 09:18:58 AM »
Keep in mind that the sugar is already in solution.  Unless you're already at the limit of sugar solubility in the water, hotter water won't matter.  And in a mash, you're nowhere near that limit.  There is no solid sugar to be dissolved during the sparge, since the sugar is all in solution when it is created.  The solubility of maltose in water at mash temps is about 66.7 % by weight (2 lb of maltose will dissolve in 1 lb of water, (ref:http://chestofbooks.com/food/science...er-gillis.html), and this is equivalent to an SG in excess of 1.300.

But like you, I sparge with hot water...like 185-195 hot.  Because the pH is fine, there is no tannin extraction.  And the extra heat gets me the last little bit of conversiuon I might otherwise miss.

I totally agree with this.  To put it another way, the viscosity of wort is nowhere near that of honey.  The consistency of wort in the mash has more similarity to water than it does to honey, or to molasses, or liquid malt extract, etc.  It's already very well dissolved in a lot of water.  So, if you heat it up, it's not really helping make it more fluid or "more dissolved" (really no such thing); it's already plenty fluid and 100% dissolved.

The only real reason, then, for anyone to heat up the sparge water is to save some time later in how much time it takes to bring all the wort to a boil.  By adding 190 F water, or even boiling water at 212 F(!), you're basically preheating the wort, with no detrimental effects.  Hell...... I think I'll start using boiling water from now on.  And why not!  There's no drawbacks at all, as long as mash pH is reasonable in the low 5's, which mine is.

Yep, we talked me into it.  From now on, I shall use boiling water for all my sparges.  I'm dead serious.

440
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Danstar Windsor
« on: April 19, 2016, 04:10:05 AM »
Huge krausen within 10 hours at 60 F.

441
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Danstar Windsor
« on: April 18, 2016, 06:51:21 AM »
I don't know yet if it's a good idea... but I'll know more in a few more days.  I've just pitched a 50/50 combination of Windsor and Nottingham into my barleywine that I brewed yesterday.  So we'll see what happens.  I hope the Windsor doesn't flocculate out anything else in its path.
Dry or slurry from a previous batch?

2-gallon batch, OG=1.077, new dry yeast packs, half pack of Notty, half pack of Windsor, sprinkled on top literally 2 hours ago, no rehydration.  I'm sure it will take off like gangbusters within 24 hours.

442
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Danstar Windsor
« on: April 18, 2016, 04:47:53 AM »
I don't know yet if it's a good idea... but I'll know more in a few more days.  I've just pitched a 50/50 combination of Windsor and Nottingham into my barleywine that I brewed yesterday.  So we'll see what happens.  I hope the Windsor doesn't flocculate out anything else in its path.

443
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash Out...
« on: April 17, 2016, 11:12:56 AM »
Or skip the mashout because it's usually a wasted effort anyway.  But Denny's right, if it matters.

444
Other Fermentables / Re: Crashing a cider
« on: April 15, 2016, 05:28:51 PM »
Great.

In doing my research, I refuse to believe that a cider takes months from juice to glass. I don't understand why it couldn't be ready as quickly as a beer if handled properly. Similarly to how some say a mead takes a year+ while Ken Schramm is knocking out gold medals <month.

I've been reading Drew's book and it is great, but I am finding it a bit lacking in some areas. If he covered hydrogen sulfide, it wasn't listed in the index or in the table of off flavors. But overall there is plenty of good info beyond add yeast and stir.
Dan Gordon talked about this on The Session when Gordon Biersch started getting into cider. I think the episode was January this year? He seemed unconvinced by some of the "common wisdom" he was faced with when getting into the business.

Funny you should bring up the Dan Gordon interview about cider.  He and I apparently have nearly identical philosophies and processes when it comes to making cider.

Stevie, you can make your cider fast if you want.  It's just harder to control.  If you miss racking and gelatin by just a few hours, it can go from semisweet to dry as hell in no time at all.  If you like it dry, you're in luck.  Likewise, if you're kegging and not worried about bottle bombs, how fortunate.  For those of us who wish to bottle, though, low and slow is pretty much superior in my opinion.  Gives us more control and tends to tire out the yeast more, so they can't cause gushers or explosions as easily.  Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks, that's all.

I would, however, advocate everyone try fermenting at low temperatures, in the 50s Fahrenheit, for a change, and see if you like the final flavors better.  I do.

445
Other Fermentables / Re: Crashing a cider
« on: April 15, 2016, 04:39:25 PM »
Dave - would degassing help to dissipate the H2S ahead of kegging?

I think that would be a great idea.

446
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: most common off-flavors
« on: April 15, 2016, 09:00:27 AM »
I don't know if there are oats and wheat in the beers I've got.

Maybe a tablespoon of flour per 5 gallons.  I hear of people advocating that a bit.

447
Other Fermentables / Re: Crashing a cider
« on: April 15, 2016, 08:59:37 AM »
I also made an Apple Ale based on the recipe dmtaylor posted and it was awesome.

I'm glad you liked it!  :)

448
Other Fermentables / Re: Crashing a cider
« on: April 15, 2016, 08:59:04 AM »
I figure I'll start to crash it at 1.015 figuring it will still crawl down a few points. I don't have any sorbate (campden is old stock from my pre-RO days), so I'll look into grabbing some.

Sorbate is more effective at hurting yeast than Campden.  Together they do a pretty great job, but still not 100% effective believe it or not.  Close enough for most people though.

449
Other Fermentables / Re: Crashing a cider
« on: April 15, 2016, 08:40:19 AM »
By the way..... some of ya'll might enjoy this thread from HBT, which provides the as-bottled gravities of dozens of commercial ciders from USA and Canada.  All the best ones in my opinion fall right around 1.010 plus or minus.  The worst ones are anything 1.020 or higher...... which is like almost all of them.  :P

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=488345&page=6

450
Other Fermentables / Re: Crashing a cider
« on: April 15, 2016, 08:35:45 AM »
I haven't backsweetened at all for the past ~dozen batches of ciders, and meads as well.  Halting fermentation does work, and at whatever point you like... 1.000, 1.005, 1.010, 1.015.... it's all good.

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