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Messages - dmtaylor

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 195
46
Ingredients / Re: What makes a good bittering hop?
« on: November 08, 2017, 04:46:21 PM »
I don't buy hops specifically for bittering.  Anything above 9% AA is going to be fine for a 60 minute bittering addition.  Since you have a limited amount of hops you are willing to buy, it makes sense to pick a bittering hop that is useful beyond bittering.  In this case, I suggest Apollo as your versatile bittering hop.  Very high AA.  Good orange and ginger flavor from 20-0.  Strong aroma as a dry hop.


47
Beer Recipes / Re: red rye ale
« on: November 08, 2017, 07:53:51 AM »
I get pine (among other things) from Simcoe as well as Chinook, so this is really just up to your own opinion.  When I can't decide, I pop each bag, sniff them, and decide based on aroma.

48
Other Fermentables / Re: mead sanitation
« on: November 07, 2017, 05:21:08 PM »
No nutrients, no Campden.  I do heat pasteurize though.   :o

49
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Soy sauce stout
« on: November 07, 2017, 10:50:35 AM »
If it is an underpitch, would anyone recommend a repitch?

And does anyone think the late hop additions could play a part in this off flavor? I.e. Hop flavor combine with lower ph and a high fermentation temp.

It is NOT an underpitch.  If anything, it's an OVERpitch.

It's not the hops.

50
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Soy sauce stout
« on: November 07, 2017, 10:30:14 AM »
I seriously doubt it's autolysis.  But there's way too much roasted malt.  Way too much.  Dark malts are acidic.  Soy sauce is kind of sour.  I think that's what's going on.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

51
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Soy sauce stout
« on: November 07, 2017, 07:16:53 AM »
2 lb chocolate and 1 lb black malt will lower the pH (acidify) the beer in a huge way.  My guess is you used too much of these.  I'd have limited to just like half a pound or less, just enough to get a black color without going overboard.

52
Beer Recipes / Re: red rye ale
« on: November 03, 2017, 04:22:21 PM »
I believe the tiger is either A) kidding or B) American.

53
Beer Recipes / Re: red rye ale
« on: November 03, 2017, 06:53:25 AM »
I would drink it and probably enjoy it.  Just brew it!

54
The Pub / Re: Checking In
« on: November 03, 2017, 04:50:50 AM »
Good to hear from you again Jim.

I look forward to your brewing--and other--adventures.

+1.  Welcome back, Jim.

55
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st ESB From A Scratch Recipe
« on: November 02, 2017, 12:48:34 PM »
I never understood the fascination with invert sugar.  Yeast sees sugar, and eats it.  Yeast doesn't care if you've twisted the sugar molecule around -- it eats it anyway, and poops out the same by-products either way.

56
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st ESB From A Scratch Recipe
« on: November 02, 2017, 06:03:07 AM »
I concur with the grain adjustments from above and would also state that you will probably want more IBU's in your finished product to balance out the crystal malt. Maybe consider shooting for 35-45 IBU's depending on your preference?

+1.  My first thought: Need more hops!  Bittering especially.  Aim for at least 32 IBUs if not 35-38.

I'd also use 1/3 as much crystal malts, consider 1/2 as much brown sugar or zero.

57
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Lactobacillus
« on: October 31, 2017, 05:57:50 AM »
A handful of raw grain in the beer has worked well for me.  These days I might use sour cream or yogurt instead to get a more pure pitch.  It doesn't take a lot.  Just needs time to act.

58
Going Pro / Re: Starting Wage for a Test-Batch Brewer?
« on: October 30, 2017, 05:10:22 PM »
Very cool!  Wish you all the best!

59
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Hops calculation w/homegrown cones
« on: October 30, 2017, 06:50:48 AM »
Sorry, I just cannot contain my enthusiasm for using homegrown hops for bittering, so here's more:

I really don't understand why most homebrewers are afraid to try their homegrown hops for bittering.  In my experience, bittering is truly the very best use for them.  And people have been boiling whole hop cones for hundreds of years without having any idea what an "alpha acid" even is.  No one should ever feel discouraged from using them for bittering.  Seriously.  Sure, you have to guess on alpha initially if you care about IBU precision, but after just one or two uses, you'll know exactly what you've got based on taste, and then in future years, they'll be pretty much the same every year.

I strongly encourage everyone to try their homegrowns for bittering.  Please do, and enjoy.

60
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Hops calculation w/homegrown cones
« on: October 30, 2017, 03:38:03 AM »
I have found my homegrown hops to have at least average if not slightly more than average alpha acid content.  I don't believe first year hops should be much different from other years.

I do use fully dried hop cones.  If your hops are still a little wet then all bets are off as they must be dried for accurate and reproducible results.  So do keep that in mind.

Assuming you are using dried hops, then a pale ale is the perfect thing to brew on your first batch with these hops for bittering.  If the beer turns out too low in bitterness, then call it a blonde ale instead!  And if too bitter, then just call it a session IPA!  Then adjust the amounts on future batches.  With experience and over the years you will figure out the average alpha acid of your hops and then can use them in many other beer styles beyond blonde, pale, or IPA.

Cheers and enjoy!

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