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Messages - dmtaylor

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481
All Grain Brewing / Re: 20 minute beer
« on: March 07, 2016, 02:59:51 PM »
Maybe really push the envelope and only mash for 10-15 minutes!?  Just as soon as most of the starches turn to sugars that can be measured by refractometer as approaching the pre-boil OG that you'd anticipated, call it good and start the boil.  Might happen in as little as 10 minutes??  For example, say you wanted a pre-boil gravity of 1.040.  Using refractometer, you can easily test for this every 3-4 minutes if you want.  Then just as soon as you get close, like 1.038 or so, immediately end the mash / heat 'er up to the boil.  What happens to body of the final beer if you do that?????  I have my hypothesis!!!

482
All Grain Brewing / Re: 20 minute beer
« on: March 07, 2016, 02:24:35 PM »
In another thread Dave Taylor suggested I try a 20 minute mash for my American mild.  Seemed interesting but I kinda dismissed it as to far outside the norm....Yeah, I know.  Well, at Club Night at PNWHC last weekend, a guy asked me if I wanted to try his 20 Minute IPA.  So I did...WOW!  It was an amazing beer. 20 min. mash, 20 min. boil!  Heavy FWH then a buttload of hops at flameout.  Fantastic beer!  I wish I would have gotten his name, but if anybody out there knows him, please have him contact me!  This is something I fully intend to try.

Yay, another potential convert.  Certainly worth experimentation by more people.

For the record, I typically would not recommend a 20-minute mash for an IPA.  I'm strictly a 40-minute kind of guy based on tons of experimentation -- just brewed another 40-minute ESB again yesterday and hit 81% brewhouse efficiency, yadda yadda.  But for a small beer like a mild, it might make sense to try a super short mash for bigger body.

EDIT: Okay, so maybe just a touch more background....... the previous thread is here:

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=26118.msg337329#msg337329

483
I'll drink to that.  :)

484
Maybe all 3 of us should put our heads together and see if there's a better way to do this.

I sense an inevitable establishment of either a merger or a mutual respect society of some sort.

Another part of me wishes James Spencer and/or Chris Colby would also jump on board somewheres.  It would be like a non-holy non-trinity at that point... mega nerdy pragmatic awesomeness... jolly good and which no one could deny.

485
I so hope D&D have their IGORs redo this one! I definitely plan to continue playing with it. I only wish there was a better way to get differing CoH levels without using different hops. Hmm.

Yeah... guess you've got to seek out that tincture of pure CoH.  Good luck with that!!  I hear you can get THC though.

When you said D&D, my mind drifted for a second...... almost makes sense, too.  ;)

486
I have long preferred Chinook for bittering APA/AIPA.  When people tell me they use Magnum for those, I kinda wonder why.

It's a purely subjective, eye of the beholder thing.  So that's never gonna be resolved across an entire hobby or industry, that's for sure.

I was just posting on another forum that I use Hallertau for much of my bittering.  Two reasons: 1) I grow my own so I always have some, and 2) because I think Hallertau tastes awesome when used for bittering.  I pick up a lot of flavor from it, and the LONGER it's boiled, not the shorter.  Right wrong indifferent, that's been my experience.  And, hey, I've got several ounces of homegrowns sitting here and it's been like a constant 4.8-5.0% alpha for the past 6 years (or at least it tastes that way to me), so why not.  I've never been impressed when reserving them as late additions, but they're great for all my bittering.

487
Fantastic xBmt.  I think it's good to know that not every single piece of conventional wisdom out there is false -- we actually heard one thing right for a change.  Cohumulone does make a difference.  I'll bet I personally would prefer the smoother low CoH type, but I can just see homebrewers everywhere now who will start bittering everything with Chinook to take their IIIIIIPAs to the next level.  So, congrats(?).   ;D

488
Ingredients / Re: What defines a base malt compared to others?
« on: March 04, 2016, 03:01:45 PM »
Thats what I heard. And at that a lot of people toss in pils or 6 row to boost

That's so 20th century... loooooong time ago.  ;)

489
The whole terroir 'thing' concerning hops must be pretty real.....

Oh, absolutely.  Hops can vary a LOT in character depending on where they're grown.  Also the amount of sun/clouds/shade and rain have huge effects as well.  Hops are very sensitive to microclimate and soil conditions, no doubt about it.

FWIW, the Meridian hops I got last year were crap.  I know erockrph loves them but mine were like mild nothingness, no sweet or fruity aroma to speak of at all whatsoever.  I think I ended up using them in a Belgian golden strong and I couldn't taste anything from them in that beer either.

490
Ingredients / Re: What defines a base malt compared to others?
« on: March 04, 2016, 10:00:48 AM »
Just curious about how to tell whether something can be used as a base or not.  Is there a dividing line? I'm guessing it's basically whatever provides the main amount of fermentable sugars, but how do you know which malts do that? I can generally tell which are base malts and which are not, but for some I don't know.
Thanks for any help!

People love to talk about enzymes and diastatic power and all that jazz, but in layman's terms, what you really want to look for is:

1) It's malted.

2) It's light in color.

3) It's not caramel or crystal or biscuit or honey malt -- these are exceptions to the rules.

That's about it.  Keep those things in mind and you're golden (no puns intended).

491
Man I wish I got that out of it. It is always dank, pungent, and resinous to me without much fruit or citrus notes.

I find it excellent on its own or even better in a blend.  Try blending with Cascade or Citra, can't go wrong there.  It can also evolve a bit with age in the bottle or keg.

492
I'm thinking Columbus (or Tomahawk or Zeus) might be the closest available American thing to a tropical Aussie style hop.  Columbus to me tastes like pineapple, pine, and citrus, like an ultra mega Cascade/Centennial with a bit of extra craziness.

493
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Test With Peppers
« on: March 01, 2016, 06:42:52 PM »
I use raw.  I chop 9 jalapenos per 5 gallons on bottling day, seeds and all, boil half in a few cups of beer and soak the other in warm vodka for several hours, then in the evening add the liquids from each to the finished beer and bottle 'er up.  You can dork around with freezing and roasting and soaking for weeks or whatever, but my method works fantastically.... gives just a slight mild burn, huge flavor and aroma.  Won awards for it, etc.  It's one of the most requested beers I make... maybe THE most.

I've never roasted peppers so I can't comment too much, but sounds like it might be worth some tasty experimentation.

494
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: February 29, 2016, 03:01:11 PM »
I disagree that American 2-row is not flavorful.  It's more yummy than people give it credit for.  No Munich malt should be necessary, especially if you want to keep this recipe more or less American.

I'd mash at about 156 F for just 20-30 minutes, then heat up immediately.  Mash time is going to limit fermentability more than temperature actually, so you could mash lower if you wanted, but definitely limit the mash TIME if you want a decent finishing gravity, body & mouthfeel.  Same advice goes to you, Denny -- try and see.  You might even still get away with using simple sugars if you mash super short, just 20 minutes.

I'd ferment in the 60s, maybe 67 F, for a day or two, then up to 72-ish for several days for a diacetyl rest.

Good luck!

495
Ingredients / Re: Magnesium!
« on: February 26, 2016, 02:45:48 PM »
Well sure, it might have its place.  23 ppm is reasonable.  The trouble is, if you go really any higher than that, it can taste like poison, very nasty.  Just..... be careful with it.

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