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Messages - dmtaylor

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526
I bottle exclusively, have for 16 years.  It gets tiring, but it's a hell of a lot easier with smaller batches.  Currently I only brew 1.7 gallons at a time typically, with the occasional bigger batch but I too hate bottling the bigger batches.  Smaller batches have a zillion advantages.  Think about it.

527
Beer Recipes / Re: Belgian/American IPA w/ Mosaic, Centennial, & Citra?
« on: September 10, 2015, 11:12:51 AM »
Sounds like a pretty good plan.  Things I'd consider:

1) Eliminate the 15-minute addition.  The later additions will give you all the flavor and aroma you need.  Save a few bucks and get the same results.

2) Go heavy handed on the Centennial, and lighter handed on Mosaic and Citra.  The latter two are extremely aggressive hops compared to Cent.

That's about it.  I assume you'll jack up your sulfates / gypsum to make the bitterness pop more?

528
I've always used 2 tablespoons cane sugar per gallon, ignoring the yeast cake, with pretty dang consistently good results.  If there's also a huge amount of hops like in an IPA, then I account for that.  As for measuring it, you can mark your fermentation vessel in advance by pouring exact amounts in and marking it off, or if not see through you can "stick the tank" by making your marks on a dowel or other reference tool that you can sanitize and stick into the vessel at the end of fermentation to measure.

529
Ingredients / Re: Full Pint Malt experiences/reviews?
« on: September 10, 2015, 10:35:34 AM »
Never heard of it.  Sounds very tasty though and worth a try!

530
Increasing liquor to grist ratio improved my efficiency considerably.

Didn't matter for me.  YMMV

I also find no benefit to stirring the mash.

This I believe is scientific fact, with the only possible exception if you do a super crappy stir at the beginning, which nobody around here would be doing, right?  :)

531
What, there's no simple fix to every brewing problem?  ;)

Au contraire, I do believe the fix to *most* brewing problems is *usually* very simple.  For efficiency, 9 times out of 10 people need to start with a harder crush.  Then move on from there if that ain't it.

532
Kegging and Bottling / Re: carbonation for 9% ABV beer in bottles
« on: September 08, 2015, 11:41:08 AM »
I too have bottled exclusively over the past 16 years.  This is a common concern with really big beers.  In truth: The extra alcohol is tiring your yeast and putting them to sleep.  You have about 50/50 odds of getting full carbonation in another few weeks.  But you might not.  Personally, if I remember to do so, I often add just a tad extra priming sugar to really big beers like this for the same reasons -- many yeast strains just get tired from the high ABV.

533
So I went with the do nothing approach and let it go- gave it an extra week to ferment to make up for the week that it took to get started. And...it finished! SG on 9/5/15 was 1.014, nice and clear, and no discernible off flavors- in fact, it tastes pretty good!

I'd like to bottle it so I can give some to friends- anything different about bottling a lager?

No, nothing different.  Bottle like normal.

534
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Interesting Flavor Not Use to
« on: September 07, 2015, 06:07:19 AM »
It's most likely the water.  It's from chlorine reacting with constituents of the malt to form something called chlorophenols.  If you didn't treat your water for chlorine, then this has got to be it.  And fortunately, it is very very easy to get rid of chlorine in your water in the future.  Before you begin your mash, all your water needs to be treated either through carbon filtration or even easier is 1/4 Campden tablet per 5 gallons, crushed and added to your water immediately prior to use.  Then this will never happen again!!
dmtaylor thank you for your insightful answer to my problem.  I am assuming this will not go away with age int eh beer so my only alternative is to throw the batch that I bottled away and start over right?  Damn, I am finished with two books out of the four of water yeast hops and malt, unfortunately water and yeast are left to read.  Oh well live and learn.  I have not noticed this in any of the other beers I have been brewing, is this only a symptom of Hef's? as I have brewed stouts, pilsners, american ales, IPA's etc. with no off tastes like this.

Are you using city municipal water?  It can change over time.  I know a guy who works for our water system in my city and he says they chlorinate heavily twice per year in the spring and the autumn.  Your own city's schedule could be similar, or entirely different.  But it is possible that on this batch you hit a chlorine surge.  That's what happened to me 15 years ago when I began to use Campden.  Before that, I was just lucky.

Another reason it might be specific to this batch is that the WLP300 yeast generates a lot more phenols than normal yeasts.  These phenols actually taste great, like cloves.  However, once the phenols combine chemically with chlorine to form chlorophenol, it will taste like medicine.

And yes, it is irreversible.  You might indeed need to dump this batch and start over.

535
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Interesting Flavor Not Use to
« on: September 06, 2015, 10:57:01 AM »
It's most likely the water.  It's from chlorine reacting with constituents of the malt to form something called chlorophenols.  If you didn't treat your water for chlorine, then this has got to be it.  And fortunately, it is very very easy to get rid of chlorine in your water in the future.  Before you begin your mash, all your water needs to be treated either through carbon filtration or even easier is 1/4 Campden tablet per 5 gallons, crushed and added to your water immediately prior to use.  Then this will never happen again!!

If your water has chlorine (not chloramine) all you have to do is put the water in an open container and let it set overnight.

True.  But also true, fortunately, is that Campden is very cheap, and works on both regular hypochlorite AND chloramine.  A little dab'll do ya.

536
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Interesting Flavor Not Use to
« on: September 05, 2015, 08:28:57 AM »
It's most likely the water.  It's from chlorine reacting with constituents of the malt to form something called chlorophenols.  If you didn't treat your water for chlorine, then this has got to be it.  And fortunately, it is very very easy to get rid of chlorine in your water in the future.  Before you begin your mash, all your water needs to be treated either through carbon filtration or even easier is 1/4 Campden tablet per 5 gallons, crushed and added to your water immediately prior to use.  Then this will never happen again!!

537
Ingredients / Re: Southern pecan porter
« on: September 05, 2015, 07:08:18 AM »
I've never done this before, but I would toast the pecans in the oven for like 10 minutes, then crush them and add them to the mash.  This just seems like the best way to do it.  I wouldn't boil them, seems odd to me and might not taste right in the finished beer, and if you kept them whole, you wouldn't extract as much flavor.

Haven't done the coffee thing, don't know about the caffeine.  Seems a reasonable hypothesis to keep them whole to minimize the caffeine if you want to try that.

538
Beer Recipes / Re: help me classify this - baltic porter?
« on: September 04, 2015, 10:39:27 AM »
That works! Yes it looks like I am 6 points below the low end of the style guidelines.

Anyone got any recommendations for widely available commercial examples of Baltic Porters? I think I have maybe seen Zywiec and maybe Baltika #6 around...

Baltika #6 is in my all-time favorite Top 10 beers that I have ever tasted.  It is really THAT good.  Get it.

539
Beer Recipes / Re: help me classify this - baltic porter?
« on: September 04, 2015, 09:11:22 AM »
Could be a Baltic porter, although most Baltics I have tasted have had lower attenuation and a good load of sweetness.  This doesn't appear to taste that way.  It might be better to refer to this as a specialty Imperial Schwarzbier!?

540
All Grain Brewing / Re: Protein rest necessary?
« on: September 03, 2015, 02:17:49 PM »
Mash at about 150 F and you'll hit the best of both alpha and beta.  And no need to wait a full hour or 90 minutes.  You'll get great results just mashing at 150 F for 45 minutes.  Save a few minutes and get the same results.  This works for >90% of all styles unless you want a super full or super dry beer.

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