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Messages - dmtaylor

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61
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:48:48 AM »
Perhaps I need to re-run all my experiments conducted 8-9 years ago.  I guess I'll very cautiously give your friend the benefit of the doubt..... especially since I'm the same guy who's been saying for 8-9 years that you only need to mash for 40 minutes.

Apologies.  Cheers.

62
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:34:02 AM »
I knew I was going to miss a detail in the conversation: I asked him about attenuation and whether or not it would be affected. His response was none at all.

Absolutely false.  Credibility = bye-bye.

Be extra careful listening to advice from any commercial brewers.  Their experience often does not correlate with homebrewing.

63
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:30:22 AM »
In my experience the difference is maybe twenty minutes between bottling a one gallon and a five gallon batch.

I think that's a bit of an exaggeration, or at least, it does not match my experience.  It takes me an extra 45-60 minutes to bottle 5 gallons as compared to 1.7 gallons.

Plus I'm old and fat and my back always hurts pretty bad after bottling 5 gallons.  So think about that as well if you're anything like me.

64
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Stalling Fermentation
« on: February 02, 2015, 09:36:50 AM »
1.100 to 1.028 is 72% apparent attenuation, which is pretty darn good for such a big beer.

As for the others... it could be very dependent on the yeast strain selected.  In my experience, US-05 gives almost the same results as WLP001 but attenuates closer to 80% instead of just mid 70s.  English and Irish yeasts (like for your Irish stout) are known to be poor attenuators in most cases although there are a couple of exceptions.

It could also be extract.  Are you an extract brewer?  Try changing the brand of the extract used.  Also consider substituting some of your extract for simple table sugar.  Ultimately you will want to consider mini-mashing to use enzymes to make more of your sugars fermentable.  Personally I extract brewed for about 3 years when I started out about 15 years ago, and I could never ever get my final gravity below about 1.018.  These days with higher quality extracts it is easier to achieve but there are still some old school extract manufacturers where it will always stall around 1.018-1.020.  So if that's the case, change brands, or step up to mini-mash brewing where you have way more control over how fermentable your malt sugars are by mashing low and slow 148 F for 90 minutes or whatever.

I'll also leave you with this:


65
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 08:46:46 AM »
When I started out making very small batches in a standard small blue cooler with a Bazooka, I discovered the importance of keeping the Bazooka covered with grains at all times.  Otherwise it sucks air through (an absurd form of "channeling"!) and you can't get your wort out once that happens.  What I found is that I could use up to about 6.1 pounds of grain with no problems.  For any recipes requiring a mash of less grains then that, BIAB was the only option, at least with my setup.  YMMV

66
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 07:39:56 AM »
After many years of 3 and 2.5 gallons I am happiest now at 1.7 gallons or occasionally I splurge and make 2 whole gallons.  Everything scales pretyy easily, I can brew on the stovetop in a bag and chilling and bottling are a cinch.  Tons of advantages and the only drawback if any is the increase in cost per bottle.  If I can brew more often and have greater variety then I am a very happy man.  Still trying to drink up those 9 cases of beer and cider that have been accumulating for years but I am finally making good progress, down from 11 cases a few months ago.....
Why is there an increased cost per bottle? In my case I still buy my base malts in bulk. I'm actually brewing much more since doing 2.5 gallon batches biab. And yea, bottling is a piece of cake, probably 45 minutes start to finish. Plus I'm always in a good mood on bottling day what with the sampling and all.

Water and yeast, to name two things.  I buy my water about a quarter of the time, and it gets a bit pricey when you're boiling so much of it off.  Yeast can remain cheap if you use portions of packs and carefully plan so you can use it multiple times.  Inevitably, for me at least, a lot of it gets wasted due to age, at least the liquid stuff.  Still costs the same $6-$8 per pack whether you make 1.7 gallons or 6 gallons.

Personally I don't buy malts in bulk as I brew so many diverse styles, I might not be able to use a 50-lb sack within 2-3 years before it might begin to taste old.  Maybe I could... I guess I never know exactly what I'll be brewing that many years in advance.

67
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 01, 2015, 10:33:13 PM »
After many years of 3 and 2.5 gallons I am happiest now at 1.7 gallons or occasionally I splurge and make 2 whole gallons.  Everything scales pretyy easily, I can brew on the stovetop in a bag and chilling and bottling are a cinch.  Tons of advantages and the only drawback if any is the increase in cost per bottle.  If I can brew more often and have greater variety then I am a very happy man.  Still trying to drink up those 9 cases of beer and cider that have been accumulating for years but I am finally making good progress, down from 11 cases a few months ago.....

68
Ingredients / Re: Piney Hops
« on: January 30, 2015, 11:36:53 AM »
Chinook, Simcoe, and Columbus are the big 3 (to me).

Yep, this. ^^^^^^^

69
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: CO2 absorption cider vs beer
« on: January 30, 2015, 11:34:18 AM »
I once saw some calculations done by Andrew Lea, a UK cider expert, on priming with sugar according to the nomograph we use for beer. The calculations said the sugar added could never account for the entire volumes of CO2 in packaged beer. He figured the carbonation must be supplemented by CO2 already in solution and maybe a small amount of fermentables left in the beer at packaging.
 
The point was that those last two sources don't apply well to cider. Cider is often bulk-aged longer, which dissipates dissolved CO2, and is usually completely dry if priming with sugar.
 
Obviously, this doesn't apply to force carbonating at all - but would explain pesky carbonation in bottles.

This is fantastic insight.  Thank you for sharing!  Makes perfect sense, and something I should no doubt pay more attention to in future.

What I'm getting out of this is that if you bulk age for a long time, or swirl or agitate the cider a lot before bottling, there's not much dissolved CO2 left, so you'll want to use extra priming sugar to compensate.  This is in contrast to a fresh, not very disturbed ferment (such as with beer) where there's a lot of dissolved CO2 so then the typical "3/4 cup per 5 gallons" rule is most applicable.

Interesting!  Thanks again!  For those who don't know, Andrew Lea is like the number one smartest dude on the whole planet when it comes to all things cider.  He's like the Michael Jackson of cider, or of pop, for that matter.   ;D

70
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Help Denny and Drew write their book!
« on: January 29, 2015, 08:11:19 AM »
I said <$200 but had to take the < out.  I'm as ghetto as they get.

71
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Help Denny and Drew write their book!
« on: January 28, 2015, 05:23:20 PM »
Denny, I hope you will find my answers to your open-ended questions as informative as they are entertaining.  Cheers to you, sir.

72
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: CO2 absorption cider vs beer
« on: January 28, 2015, 12:15:52 PM »
I have experienced gushers, so I do know that champagne-like carbonation is entirely possible with cider.  In that case I blame the Brett that I used, which no doubt continued fermentation in the bottles for a very long time.  The priming sugar in that case only made matters even worse.

73
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How long diacetyl rest?
« on: January 27, 2015, 12:11:31 PM »
I don't rack to secondary.  Just leave the beer in primary until bottling day.  Experience of myself and many others has proven that autolysis takes many months to set in.  There is no real advantage of racking to secondary, just leave the beer in primary the whole time.

74
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How long diacetyl rest?
« on: January 27, 2015, 09:42:55 AM »
Does the beer taste like diacetyl?  If not, then you don't need to do a D rest at all.  However it won't hurt either.  For my lagers I typically raise temperature after the fermentation seems to be around 2/3 to 3/4 complete, then keep it there until fermentation is 100% complete.  Typically this will take 3-4 days, but sometimes it will take weeks.  Let the yeast be your guide.  When the airlock stops bubbling, the krausen falls, and the beer begins to clear, then you can chill back down to do your lagering phase.

75
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: CO2 absorption cider vs beer
« on: January 27, 2015, 07:49:38 AM »
It might bear mentioning.....

Perfectly clean glassware with zero residue is absolutely essential for maintaining carbonation, for beer and ESPECIALLY for cider.

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