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Messages - dmtaylor

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616
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: musty flavor
« on: December 01, 2015, 02:54:41 PM »
Sounds like oxidation.  Causes and effects of oxidation are all over the place.... old malt, old extract, aeration at various points and how it was done, how the fermenters are handled, bulk aging prior to bottling/kegging, air intake during bottling or in the keg, just plain age of the beer itself..... or could also be simulated by over-use of crystal/caramel malts......... could be any number of things.

And I always hate to say it, but it truly could be a sanitation or contamination problem.  It happens even to the best brewers sometimes.  Don't think it's not possible, because it IS.  Or the yeast might not have been as healthy as you thought, and something else got in there.  Happens.

617
Beer Recipes / Re: Critique wanted on sweet stout
« on: November 30, 2015, 07:57:04 PM »
Hmm... that's some nasty Heineken style water, then.  I've never heard of anyone having to add acid to their stout.  But I suppose there's a first time for everything.

Enjoy.

618
Too complicated.  Mash the whole thing at 150 F for 40 minutes and call it good.  You can get it up to a boil within about 30 minutes, correct?  Consider that your "mashout".

619
Beer Recipes / Re: Critique wanted on sweet stout
« on: November 30, 2015, 06:54:27 PM »
I think it looks really good. I wouldn't think you'd need the acid malt though, as the dark malts acidify the mash already.

EDIT - You'll actually need to raise pH most likely with this beer. I like baking soda (via Brunwater) to do that.

+1000000.  Exactly.

620
This may sound cynical, but I think brewers sometimes think their beer tastes a certain way because of something they've read, even if that character isn't really there. The same way I think judges often misperceive certain flavors/aroma for off-flavors because it's unfamiliar to them (e.g., unique Pils malt character for DMS, UK Caramelt malt for diacetyl, etc). I could be wrong. Or just a dick ;)

No, I'm the dick.  But you're right, though.  I think Novice or Recognized judges, especially, enjoy applying their newfound knowledge of off-flavors in overly creative ways.  And then some judges never seem to be able to grow out of it.  Unfortunately I've also seen a Master level judge who claimed he could pick up astringency in the aroma.  Uh, no, sorry buddy.... he lost 100% credibility with that one.  I don't care what the hell level somebody thinks he is.... that's just wrong.

621
Fascinating results, especially the part about pH being only hundredths of a point different.  I shall henceforth return to full mashes for my stouts and porters, as depth of flavor and color are more important to me with these styles than the theoretical but probably non-existent "smoothness" from late capping.

I have zero constructive comments for this xBmt.  Well done.  Thank you again, Marshall.

622
All Grain Brewing / Re: When is thin too thin?
« on: November 29, 2015, 03:29:22 PM »
"They" say don't go more than 3 qt/lb.  This ensures good enzymatic concentration for proper conversion and fermentability.

623
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Thin brew
« on: November 26, 2015, 05:05:57 AM »
Extra sugars jack up the alcohol and also serve to thin out the beer.

Solution: Bottle with about 350 grams lactose per 5 gallons (19 liters) in addition to the regular priming sugar.  Lactose is an unfermentable sugar that will add body and a slight sweetness back into the beer.  Perfect thing to do for a winter warmer.

Enjoy.

624
Homebrew Competitions / Re: what category for BJCP 2015 style guidelines?
« on: November 25, 2015, 10:09:12 AM »
The thing that throws it into 34C as far as I'm concerned is the American hops.  If it tastes like American hops at all, then it's not a true German hefeweizen base anymore, but rather an amalgamation of maybe three different styles!?  I don't know if it's okay to say "German hefe with lemongrass AND American hops".  Hops are probably not the herb or spice that 30A is looking for.  And with a traditional German wheat beer yeast in there, it's not an American hefe either.

625
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 point FG difference
« on: November 25, 2015, 09:40:51 AM »
I'll confess... I haven't mashed a lot of beers less than 147 F.  Most typically I mash at 148-150 F.  Almost every beer, in fact.  It just surprises the hell out of me that just a few degrees could make so much difference.  I don't believe it.  I just don't.

To paraphrase Sherlock Holmes, when you've ruled out everything else, you;re left with the impossible.  There is really no other rational explanation that I can see.

Fascinating.  If true... fascinating.

EDIT: Oh my God.  Oh my God.  One beer I have brewed stuck out in my mind as finishing bizarrely dry.  I once made an English barleywine with a long mash that averaged 146 F, which has got to be the lowest and slowest mash I have ever done -- mash time was 160 minutes.  Probably started around 148 F and finished 144 F, something like that.  And..... I got 88% attenuation, final gravity 1.011, and fermentation was totally complete in just 2-3 days.  I was shocked and amazed.  Still am.

That limit-dextrinase....... man, that's some weird stuff.  I'm sure it helped that the mash time was long.  But even so.  That's some crazy stuff.  And the beer didn't taste super dry.  Just was very well attenuated.

Mind blown.

626
Homebrew Competitions / Re: what category for BJCP 2015 style guidelines?
« on: November 25, 2015, 09:39:21 AM »
Yowser..... that's truly a 34C Experimental if ever I heard of one.

627
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 point FG difference
« on: November 25, 2015, 09:34:37 AM »
I'll confess... I haven't mashed a lot of beers less than 147 F.  Most typically I mash at 148-150 F.  Almost every beer, in fact.  It just surprises the hell out of me that just a few degrees could make so much difference.  I don't believe it.  I just don't.

628
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 point FG difference
« on: November 25, 2015, 09:04:30 AM »
I have had success in the past with unsticking stuck fermentations using yeast energizer and warmth, and lots of swirling.  I usually run into this problem with finicky Belgian yeasts though, not US-05.

However the best way would be to get a good vigorous yeast starter going for a couple days, then add that to the fermenter.  Just dumping a pack or two of dry yeast on top doesn't do anything -- it has to be a very lively vigorous yeast starter for it to work.  Some people would use champagne yeast but personally I would not do that -- just make a starter of a pack or two of US-05 for a couple days, and add that in.  I've not done this myself, but it might be the only thing that would work -- if that doesn't work, nothing else will, except maybe for that champagne yeast idea.  Or Brett!  Brett could also do the trick, but at the expense(?) of oddball Bretty flavors, and again, possible explosions if bottled too early.

629
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 point FG difference
« on: November 25, 2015, 08:47:18 AM »
Okay, back to your original questions... what to expect as far as taste......

I do NOT think 1.020 FG will taste syrupy in such a strong beer.  The alcohol presence will serve to balance out the sugars.  It may, however, need some age to mellow out -- and this goes for both Batches 1 & 2.  Maybe it will taste more appealing after 6-9 months of age, for example.  Before that, it will taste more "hot" in alcohol.

You'll obviously have more body.

I still can't help but assume that somehow or other, you're going to end up with gushers out of this.  Expect high carbonation from Batch 2.  Mark my words.  It might not happen right away, but after a month or two.... yeah.  Be aware of the possibility.

630
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 10 point FG difference
« on: November 25, 2015, 08:32:05 AM »
Baffling.

Why would fermentation stall?  Did you mess with temperatures during those first two weeks?  Cool it down too early and settle out your yeast before they were done?

Could there have actually been contamination in Batch 1???  I doubt it, but, it could explain a difference.

Could also possibly be an ingredients thing -- maybe you accidentally used lactose instead of corn sugar, or something crazy like that!?

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