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Messages - dmtaylor

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766
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Test With Peppers
« on: March 01, 2016, 06:42:52 PM »
I use raw.  I chop 9 jalapenos per 5 gallons on bottling day, seeds and all, boil half in a few cups of beer and soak the other in warm vodka for several hours, then in the evening add the liquids from each to the finished beer and bottle 'er up.  You can dork around with freezing and roasting and soaking for weeks or whatever, but my method works fantastically.... gives just a slight mild burn, huge flavor and aroma.  Won awards for it, etc.  It's one of the most requested beers I make... maybe THE most.

I've never roasted peppers so I can't comment too much, but sounds like it might be worth some tasty experimentation.

767
Beer Recipes / Re: Need a little advice...
« on: February 29, 2016, 03:01:11 PM »
I disagree that American 2-row is not flavorful.  It's more yummy than people give it credit for.  No Munich malt should be necessary, especially if you want to keep this recipe more or less American.

I'd mash at about 156 F for just 20-30 minutes, then heat up immediately.  Mash time is going to limit fermentability more than temperature actually, so you could mash lower if you wanted, but definitely limit the mash TIME if you want a decent finishing gravity, body & mouthfeel.  Same advice goes to you, Denny -- try and see.  You might even still get away with using simple sugars if you mash super short, just 20 minutes.

I'd ferment in the 60s, maybe 67 F, for a day or two, then up to 72-ish for several days for a diacetyl rest.

Good luck!

768
Ingredients / Re: Magnesium!
« on: February 26, 2016, 02:45:48 PM »
Well sure, it might have its place.  23 ppm is reasonable.  The trouble is, if you go really any higher than that, it can taste like poison, very nasty.  Just..... be careful with it.

769
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 26, 2016, 12:38:48 PM »
I'd suggest you switch to distilled water if you know you have iron and high alkalinity -- neither is very good in beer.  In that case, addition of gypsum is like putting a Band-Aid on a bullet wound.  Find some softer water and your taste buds will thank you for it.  :)

770
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 26, 2016, 11:21:22 AM »
If you're using mostly extract with a little specialty malt, you generally don't need to add any brewing salts at all such as gypsum -- just use distilled water or soft tap water.  I'd skip the gypsum if I were you.  It's only for flavor, and in this case, you really don't need it.  In an IPA or ESB then it would make more sense.

Like I said before, if you're not mashing base malt (2-row or pale malt or Maris Otter or pilsner malt), then just a simple 5-10 minutes steeping time is plenty.  Otherwise, steep any style at 150 F for 30-40 minutes and you should be happy.  It really is as simple as that!

771
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 26, 2016, 10:45:03 AM »
Holy cats!  You don't need to do a mash at all, so all you need to do is steep for maybe 5-10 minutes while your water is coming up towards the boil.  When the temperature hits 150-160 F, keep it there for a couple minutes, then increase the heat and remove the bag as soon as the overall temperature hits about 170 F.  Then turn off your heat, add the extract, stir well to dissolve, then boil and brew like normal.  No need to dork around for 30-75 minutes if you're not mashing any base malts!!  It's just a steep for flavor and color, not to convert starches into sugars.  If you had base malt in there, then you'd want to wait for at least 30-40 minutes.  75 minutes would be mega-overkill IMO.

772
Ingredients / Re: Old LME - To use or not?
« on: February 26, 2016, 08:36:49 AM »
Save it for starters only.

773
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 26, 2016, 06:21:11 AM »
I like to kill stuff in the high alcohol of vodka.  Then add just a little of the tincture at a time until it tastes right.  I use this for all sorts of stuff, from jalapenos to spices to herbs to citrus peels.  It works great.

774
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 24, 2016, 11:28:35 AM »
Vanilla extract often contains sugar but it should contain so little sugar for the amount you are adding that it will be an inconsequential amount of sugar.

It does?  Not from what I have seen.

775
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: yeast starter from dry yeast
« on: February 24, 2016, 11:11:32 AM »
Well yes of course.

776
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: yeast starter from dry yeast
« on: February 24, 2016, 09:56:17 AM »
The one time when I would advise it is for krausening to get rid of diacetyl or the finishing gravity being too high.  Sprinkling dry yeast on either of those would likely be fruitless.  But for initial pitch, you never need a starter for that with dry yeast.  It's the big advantage.

777
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 24, 2016, 09:21:16 AM »
No, not at all.

778
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 24, 2016, 09:06:30 AM »
how much vanilla extract would you use in the bottling bucket?

Start with about 2 teaspoons, then mix and taste.  If you need more, add it about one teaspoon at a time until it tastes good.  Probably won't need more than 3 or 4 teaspoons in 5 gallons but it's totally up to your own sense of taste.

779
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 24, 2016, 08:43:42 AM »
Yes, absolutely, the light extracts will work just fine for this recipe.

780
Beer Recipes / Re: 1st American Stout Recipe Help
« on: February 24, 2016, 08:34:22 AM »
I think that's a great start to a recipe -- vanilla and all!  I don't have brewing software with me (at work) but off the top of my head I think those types and amounts of specialty grains seem pretty good.  Assuming 5 gallon batch size, probably need around 6 pounds of extract to go with it -- any type is fine but "light" would be the standard since you're adding all your own specialty grains anyway.

Cascade and Cent are great hops as well.  You might want to bitter to around 40-50 IBUs to start out.  As a swag, I think you'll need roughly 1.5 to 2 oz Cascade for bittering (boil for 45 to 60 minutes), then charge with another 1.5 to 2 oz Centennial in the last 5 minutes of the boil for flavor and aroma, something like that.

Yeast doesn't matter a whole lot.  US-05/001/1056 would be the standard, but use anything you think you might like or have on hand, it really isn't a big player here.

Add your vanilla on bottling/kegging day.  Get some good quality vanilla extract (from Mexico or Caribbean seems to be good a lot of times) or try using a couple real vanilla beans soaked in a little vodka for a few days just before bottling/kegging, then just add the flavored vodka to the finished beer.  Don't add any to the boil, it would just be a waste I think.

Good luck!

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