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Messages - dmtaylor

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781
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 01:17:54 PM »
Thinness or thickness of the mash makes virtually zero difference and should not impact mash time at all.  Experiment and see for yourself.

782
It won't matter in the slightest unless you get really crummy judges.  FWIW, I short fill all my bottles to about 10.5 oz because my bottling wand leaves that much space.  It just doesn't matter.  Some judges care, but if they do then they're idiots.

Dave Taylor
Certified #A0511

783
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 12:57:35 PM »
I just love when people give their mash times, or anything else, and when you ask why they do what they do, they say, "because it just works for me and I like it that way."  Love that.

 ::)

784
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 12:54:03 PM »
I've got about 500 old bottles in a big crate in my basement.

Once I found a fully intact centipede in a partially consumed bottle of beer.  The beer tasted just fine.  So, I drank it anyway.  I'm still alive.  True story!

 :o  8)

785
All Grain Brewing / Re: High gravity efficiency troubles
« on: February 02, 2015, 12:26:06 PM »
Bigger beer = lower efficiency.  It's probably as simple as this.  I can easily average more than 90% efficiency on normal gravity beers, but based on experience I know that if I made a beer around 1.100, my normal mash and sparge methods would take efficiency way down to around 50%.  Play around with partigyle or longer boil times to get more points out if you want.  Or just take the hit.  Your option.  Bigger beer = lower efficiency.

EDIT: Okay, I'll give you another idea.  You actually need to mash THICKER so that you can sparge a lot more so you're not wasting so much sugar.  Keep on collecting until runnings get down to 1.010.  Then boil 'er way down.  Might be a 2 or 3-hour boil, somewhere in there.  Guaranteed huge efficiency increase.

786
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 12:22:28 PM »
I like your technique, beersk.  Thanks for sharing.

Unfortunately, for me, I get things like spiders and centipedes that crawl into my bottles over time, paper, old yeast sediment, etc.  I can't tell you how many times I've found things in my bottles that your technique would not have caught.

But would it work about 99% of the time?  You betcha!  Yeah, it could save me a lot of time.  I'll have to give this some more consideration.....

787
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 12:17:12 PM »
My viewpoint is select the right tool (mash schedule) for the job. Yeah I might try mashing short for NA 2 row or 6 row, not British or German malts.

Excellent list, Jeff.  I agree 100%.

788
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:48:48 AM »
Perhaps I need to re-run all my experiments conducted 8-9 years ago.  I guess I'll very cautiously give your friend the benefit of the doubt..... especially since I'm the same guy who's been saying for 8-9 years that you only need to mash for 40 minutes.

Apologies.  Cheers.

789
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:34:02 AM »
I knew I was going to miss a detail in the conversation: I asked him about attenuation and whether or not it would be affected. His response was none at all.

Absolutely false.  Credibility = bye-bye.

Be extra careful listening to advice from any commercial brewers.  Their experience often does not correlate with homebrewing.

790
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:30:22 AM »
In my experience the difference is maybe twenty minutes between bottling a one gallon and a five gallon batch.

I think that's a bit of an exaggeration, or at least, it does not match my experience.  It takes me an extra 45-60 minutes to bottle 5 gallons as compared to 1.7 gallons.

Plus I'm old and fat and my back always hurts pretty bad after bottling 5 gallons.  So think about that as well if you're anything like me.

791
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Stalling Fermentation
« on: February 02, 2015, 09:36:50 AM »
1.100 to 1.028 is 72% apparent attenuation, which is pretty darn good for such a big beer.

As for the others... it could be very dependent on the yeast strain selected.  In my experience, US-05 gives almost the same results as WLP001 but attenuates closer to 80% instead of just mid 70s.  English and Irish yeasts (like for your Irish stout) are known to be poor attenuators in most cases although there are a couple of exceptions.

It could also be extract.  Are you an extract brewer?  Try changing the brand of the extract used.  Also consider substituting some of your extract for simple table sugar.  Ultimately you will want to consider mini-mashing to use enzymes to make more of your sugars fermentable.  Personally I extract brewed for about 3 years when I started out about 15 years ago, and I could never ever get my final gravity below about 1.018.  These days with higher quality extracts it is easier to achieve but there are still some old school extract manufacturers where it will always stall around 1.018-1.020.  So if that's the case, change brands, or step up to mini-mash brewing where you have way more control over how fermentable your malt sugars are by mashing low and slow 148 F for 90 minutes or whatever.

I'll also leave you with this:


792
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 08:46:46 AM »
When I started out making very small batches in a standard small blue cooler with a Bazooka, I discovered the importance of keeping the Bazooka covered with grains at all times.  Otherwise it sucks air through (an absurd form of "channeling"!) and you can't get your wort out once that happens.  What I found is that I could use up to about 6.1 pounds of grain with no problems.  For any recipes requiring a mash of less grains then that, BIAB was the only option, at least with my setup.  YMMV

793
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 07:39:56 AM »
After many years of 3 and 2.5 gallons I am happiest now at 1.7 gallons or occasionally I splurge and make 2 whole gallons.  Everything scales pretyy easily, I can brew on the stovetop in a bag and chilling and bottling are a cinch.  Tons of advantages and the only drawback if any is the increase in cost per bottle.  If I can brew more often and have greater variety then I am a very happy man.  Still trying to drink up those 9 cases of beer and cider that have been accumulating for years but I am finally making good progress, down from 11 cases a few months ago.....
Why is there an increased cost per bottle? In my case I still buy my base malts in bulk. I'm actually brewing much more since doing 2.5 gallon batches biab. And yea, bottling is a piece of cake, probably 45 minutes start to finish. Plus I'm always in a good mood on bottling day what with the sampling and all.

Water and yeast, to name two things.  I buy my water about a quarter of the time, and it gets a bit pricey when you're boiling so much of it off.  Yeast can remain cheap if you use portions of packs and carefully plan so you can use it multiple times.  Inevitably, for me at least, a lot of it gets wasted due to age, at least the liquid stuff.  Still costs the same $6-$8 per pack whether you make 1.7 gallons or 6 gallons.

Personally I don't buy malts in bulk as I brew so many diverse styles, I might not be able to use a 50-lb sack within 2-3 years before it might begin to taste old.  Maybe I could... I guess I never know exactly what I'll be brewing that many years in advance.

794
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 01, 2015, 10:33:13 PM »
After many years of 3 and 2.5 gallons I am happiest now at 1.7 gallons or occasionally I splurge and make 2 whole gallons.  Everything scales pretyy easily, I can brew on the stovetop in a bag and chilling and bottling are a cinch.  Tons of advantages and the only drawback if any is the increase in cost per bottle.  If I can brew more often and have greater variety then I am a very happy man.  Still trying to drink up those 9 cases of beer and cider that have been accumulating for years but I am finally making good progress, down from 11 cases a few months ago.....

795
Ingredients / Re: Piney Hops
« on: January 30, 2015, 11:36:53 AM »
Chinook, Simcoe, and Columbus are the big 3 (to me).

Yep, this. ^^^^^^^

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