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Messages - dmtaylor

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826
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: macro homebrew trends
« on: October 07, 2016, 09:54:23 PM »
Black IPA is out.

WHAT?  :o
I have one planned for early next year.   :-[

You missed the train.

Seriously... do what makes you happy.  I still enjoy my RIS.  I just don't dumb it down or use artificial black food coloring and insist on calling everything an IPA.

I kid.  A little.  ;)

827
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: macro homebrew trends
« on: October 07, 2016, 03:55:39 PM »
NEIPAs
Accelerated lager fermentation schedules including higher than traditional temps

Oh yeah -- good ones.  Or should I say -- juicy ones.

I don't believe either of these is a fad that will die.  Here to stay.  You could say "macro" even.

828
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: macro homebrew trends
« on: October 07, 2016, 03:28:49 PM »
We don't understand your use of the term.  Must define for us silly Americans.

829
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: macro homebrew trends
« on: October 07, 2016, 02:43:39 PM »
Stupid style trend stuff that applies both to homebrew and to commercial:

Black IPA is out.
Habanero, Ghost Pepper, Jalapeno, and other pepper beers used to be in but are kind of fading out now.
Saisons with stupid additives are still in but starting to fall out of favor.
Overly salted gose is now in.
Sculpins are in (IPA with citrus peel or other fruit flavors).
Anything with loads of brand new hops with stupid names is in.
Meanwhile... Interest in cider is exploding!  I am happy about this, even if the USA commercial examples mostly suck.

Other general non-stylistic trendy type things (sorry if some of these might not actually be "trends"):

I agree with the BIAB comment above -- more and more folks are giving it a try and loving it.  BIAB is also an especially good option for those wanting to make smaller batches...

Not everyone is making 5-6 gallons by default anymore -- I think most still do, but not all.  There are kits now for 1, 2, and 3 gallons for those wanting to start out small or who are only very casually interested in the hobby.

Most homebrewing forums are dead or almost dead, trending more towards generally poor advice from less formal Facebook groups.

Most American homebrewers don't know what LODO is yet, but they will in another year or two.  We're still on the far left end of the time scale.  My bet is they'll try it out for a few years, decide it's a pain and not decidedly better in flavor, and so it will go by the wayside just like olive oil aeration and so many other fads from 10 years ago.

Dry yeast is being used as much as ever and maybe even more, as more and more strains are being released.

Rehydration is a steady flat trend, as is pitching in accordance with MrMalty.

More folks are trying refractometers and getting super confused about how they work and how to adjust pre and post ferment readings, e.g., complaining of very high FG readings.

Brulosophy.com has become SO huge, it's YUGE!  YUGE!  They and Denny inspired me to run my own blind triangles this month.  My club was impressed and found it as entertaining as it was educational.  I think this is going to be happening again and in more and more clubs around the nation, inspired by the likes of Marshall and Denny.  Thank you guys.

Many US homebrewers are now playing with water, but meanwhile nobody truly understands it, and in a few cases, homebrewers who become obsessed with perfecting their water may in fact be hurting their beer instead of improving it.  My humble opinion.

No one might agree with me on every point, but this is my 2 cents, so accept it for what it is truly worth.

Cheers.   :)

830
Kegging and Bottling / Re: bottling and gelatin
« on: October 06, 2016, 04:47:58 PM »
I prime and bottle exclusively.  For the past several batches I have used gelatin a few days in advance for clarity.  There is still plenty of yeast for natural carbonation, and no need to add any yeast.  Whoever told you there's not enough yeast left after gelatin probably never tried it themselves, because it's just not true.

831
All Grain Brewing / Re: To rest or not to rest, that is the question.
« on: October 06, 2016, 02:07:54 PM »
A protein rest would likely have exactly the opposite effect of what you desire.  In my experience, it can destroy body and head retention.

My cheater's method for excellent body and head retention: rye.  Substitute about 10% of the base malt with either rye malt or flaked rye.  It works every time.  And yes, chocolate rye is a fantastic option for this style, I love the chocolate rye and have used it to good effect many times.

832
Ingredients / Re: Fresh figs
« on: October 05, 2016, 08:55:07 PM »
They don't have a lot of flavor fresh.  Taste better when dried.  They'll add sugar and that's about it.

833
Ingredients / Re: complimentary hops with Ekuanot
« on: October 04, 2016, 04:32:45 PM »
Is there anyone else that can't get past the ridiculous new name? If you can't call it Equinox, find something different sounding (like Solstice, maybe?) instead of a mangled version of the original name.

That's funny, coming from erock.   ;D

Took me a few seconds to figure out that Ekuanot = Equinox, but it does make it easier for "people in the know" to know what it is without any research so it was actually helpful for that reason.  :)

834
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Decline of Homebrewing
« on: October 04, 2016, 03:32:26 PM »
if I brewed for the beer I could take the next decade off drinking the stuff - especially mead - that I've got. 

but at least it's not the 25 year supply I used to have.   8)

There's a reason I only brew 1.7 gallons at a time these days..... I still have about 6-7 cases of beer and cider aging in the cellar, and I just can't drink it all fast enough to keep up with my overpowering desire to brew and experiment.  I sometimes ponder if I should decrease this to just 1.3 gallons, and in fact I did this on my last batch but ended up sad that I don't have a few more bottles left than I do, so I'm staying with 1.7 gallons.

Yes... I brew for the process, and for the science of it, as well as the creativity of it, way more than I do for the need for beer or for cost savings or anything like that.

835
Beer Recipes / Re: Koyt-gruit hybrid
« on: October 04, 2016, 12:16:05 PM »
Twerp.  ;)

I seriously hope the wormwood doesn't ruin the experience for you.  Gruit ales can be a very wonderful thing indeed.

I wonder if the oat malt didn't have enough enzymes in all the right places for conversion in an hour.  I've never used oat malt before, much less as a base malt.

836
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 8 weeks in primary...
« on: October 03, 2016, 05:21:01 PM »
I hear you... It's happened to me enough times as well to know that autolysis is real.  I can't remember now if I set my rule of thumb to 6 weeks or to 8 weeks but it's in that ballpark to where if you're planning on going any longer than about 6 weeks, start to be concerned that it could go bad.  These days I try to get my beer into bottles or secondary if necessary within 4-6 weeks max so I haven't had this problem for many years now.

837
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New German Only(Brewing) site and forum
« on: September 30, 2016, 04:16:19 PM »
Apparently I have somehow been entirely ignorant and perhaps noticeably absent regarding all this talk about deoxygenated water.

Until today.  Today I wasted hours reading up on all this sh!t.  And that is my tentative conclusion: it is sh!t.

The pseudo science and recommended practice of a 30 minute protein rest killed it for me, not to mention that a friend of mine can achieve "it" with a single infusion and nothing special other than using continental malt, hops, and the right yeast.

Yes, I know what "it" is, and I love and crave "it".  I think maybe I even can get close to "it" in my own beers.  However this all also leads me to believe that there's little if any need to futz with this secretive fake sciency LODO and Brewtan stuff.

I will let you guys run these experiments while I continue to play with "regular" decoction and efficiency.  Results coming soon/eventually on my triangles.

838
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: September 30, 2016, 04:14:18 PM »
Dave, I'm 99% certain Brewtan improved my beers with minimal effort.  That's why we have 15 brewers lined up to do an experiment with it.

Wow.  Alright then, maybe I should be more open minded, like the Germans.   :o

I guess I posted in the wrong thread.  I'll copy and repost in the other one.

839
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: September 30, 2016, 03:57:26 AM »
Apparently I have somehow been entirely ignorant and perhaps noticeably absent regarding all this talk about deoxygenated water and Brewtan, etc.

Until today.  Today I wasted hours reading up on all this sh!t.  And that is my tentative conclusion: it is sh!t.

The pseudo science and recommended practice of a 30 minute protein rest killed it for me, not to mention that a friend of mine can achieve "it" with a single infusion and nothing special other than using continental malt, hops, and the right yeast.

Yes, I know what "it" is, and I love and crave "it".  I think maybe I even can get close to "it" in my own beers.  However this all also leads me to believe that there's little if any need to futz with this secretive fake sciency LODO and Brewtan stuff.

I will let you guys run these experiments while I continue to play with "regular" decoction and efficiency.  Results coming soon/eventually on my triangles.

840
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Danstar Windsor
« on: September 29, 2016, 08:12:31 PM »
Hi guys first post here and thought I'd pick this thread up as came  across this forum on a search for Windsor yeast. Very informative. my fermentation seems to have stopped at 1020 which seems a common point. It's been 10 days now and the ale is still quite cloudy. Alcohol ok as it started at 1060.

I would be happy to let it sit there for a few weeks but I've dry hopped loose leaves 4 days ago and wouldn't want to leave them. This is my first all grain brew and one mistake was not topping up with enough water so fermenter is  only half full, as would the secondary fermenter be if I transferred to that. I would worry about oxegising.  How long do you guys think it will take for the Windsor yeast to drop?

This is unusual for Windsor.  If I recall correctly, the Windsor yeast flocculates very fast within a day or two after fermentation is complete.

In any case, you can get the yeast out faster by adding gelatin.  My process for doing that: Microwave about 1/2 cup of water until it boils.  Then add 1/2 teaspoon unflavored gelatin and stir to dissolve.  Allow to cool for a few minutes then add to your fermenter and swirl the fermenter to mix it in.  About 24-48 hours later, your beer should be clear.

Hope this helps.  I still think it seems unusual for Windsor yeast not to settle out right away.  I wonder if your dry hops introduced contamination.  However the gelatin would help with that as well.

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