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Messages - dmtaylor

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826
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Full Boil Impact
« on: March 11, 2016, 10:19:44 AM »
If you boil hard & short, then it really just becomes a balancing act between time vs. hop bitterness.  I might go so far as to round all my hop additions to the nearest half-ounce or whatever, then calculate how many minutes I need to boil to get the IBUs that I want.  So, if I want 30 IBUs and I need to boil for exactly 38 minutes with a half-ounce of hops to get that many IBUs, then by golly I might just do it that way.  As a small-batch brewer, this will make storage of leftover hops easier for me.  But for you big batch guys, round to whole ounces and do the same thing if you want.

827
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Full Boil Impact
« on: March 11, 2016, 10:01:30 AM »
I mash for 40, not boil, at least not usually.  But I'm heading there.

Personally I'm of the opinion that boil vigor is way more important than boil time.  You need that wort to be practically jumping out of the kettle to get the best clarity and hop utilization, oh and I'm sure it doesn't hurt either getting the DMS precursor out of there.  If you only simmer the kettle or do a weak rolling boil, it's not going to be as effective as the leaping geyser type effects.  I learned this from the guy I know who makes the best homebrews of most my other buddies -- he says don't dick around with adjusting heat, just friggin crank 'er up, as long as your kettle is big enough to hold it anyway.  Make sure your kettle and your heat source are big enough for jumping and bouncing and leaping of vigorously boiling wort.  If you can do that, then I see no reason why 20-30 minute boils shouldn't work.  I'm heading in that direction, already tried 45 minutes on a few batches and it didn't hurt anything.  And yes I boil very vigorously, have for years.

828
I change my batch volumes a lot.  Those of us who do that and who use old software with %/hour boiloff rates just have to memorize the percentages for each size.  To keep it easy, I know that for me, my boiloff percentages jump around approximately in multiples of 4.  For 5 gallons, I just have to remember boiloff rate is around 16%.  For 2.5-3 gallons, it's about 24%.  For 2 gallons, 28%.  And for my smallest batch size of 1.7 gallons, it's 32%.  This isn't exact but gets me close enough, and the numbers are easier for me to remember this way.

I'm starting to think 2 gallons might become my new normal.  1.7 gallons wasn't quite cutting it.  But I'm not sure yet.  So I've actually been bouncing back and forth between 1.7 and 2 gallons.  If I start brewing more often again then I'll need to adjust down to 1.7 gallons.  But anyway, I digress.

829
You can brew most styles to a lower original gravity (say a maximum of 1.035-1.040) and combine this with the use of a low attenuating yeast such as Windsor ale yeast to give a low strength, low alcohol beer that still has body and flavor.  Windsor yeast is well suited to most British and American beer styles.  Other yeasts can turn the beer more watery.  Saison is another option but you might want to keep the original gravity even lower, maybe 1.030-1.035 since it could finish about 1.000 if you use Belle Saison or Wyeast 3711 yeast, but even with that low of a gravity it will still give you 4 to 4.5% ABV.  Alcohol has a lot of calories too, not just the residual sugars.

830
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WY3787 Attenuation
« on: March 10, 2016, 04:40:21 AM »
Yep, that'll make a difference.

831
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WY3787 Attenuation
« on: March 09, 2016, 08:03:52 PM »
It could happen I suppose.  But my experience has been closer to 76%.  Did you use a lot of simple sugars in the recipe??  That could do it.

832
Ingredients / Re: Blending Malts
« on: March 09, 2016, 10:00:10 AM »
FWIW, both of those are in fact pale malt.  Depending on the maltster of the MO, it might be closer to a pale ale malt.  In general, pale malt and what's referred to as "2 row" are the same thing.  And almost every barley malt out there will be 2 row.

Good point.  I fall into this same trap.  It's carryover from when we started brewing way back in the 1990s, when 6-row was very common.  Remember those days, man?  ;)

I don't remember anything before last Saturday!  ;)

I can't remember yesterday!  I just remember doing..... what they told me.... told me... told me... told me....

833
Ingredients / Re: Blending Malts
« on: March 09, 2016, 09:23:26 AM »
FWIW, both of those are in fact pale malt.  Depending on the maltster of the MO, it might be closer to a pale ale malt.  In general, pale malt and what's referred to as "2 row" are the same thing.  And almost every barley malt out there will be 2 row.

Good point.  I fall into this same trap.  It's carryover from when we started brewing way back in the 1990s, when 6-row was very common.  Remember those days, man?  ;)

834
Ingredients / Re: Blending Malts
« on: March 09, 2016, 06:08:53 AM »
Yes, I do this a lot.  Rather than doing a 50/50 blend, I like to use up one and make up the rest with the other.  Take your pick.

Randy Mosher in his book Radical Brewing also advocated blending to build complexity.  He suggests thinking about ingredients as a spectrum, much like a portrait artist would blend different hues of paint on their palette to create the hue that he or she wants, rather than just using globs of one thing and another.  Either will work but it depends what you want.  If you spread things out you also ensure you'll hit the target.  For example, a beer with just 2-row and Crystal 40 is not going to be as complex as 2-row, Maris Otter, Crystal 20, 40, and 60.  It's more the shotgun approach than the sharpshooter, but it's another thing worth trying.

835
All Grain Brewing / Re: 20 minute beer
« on: March 07, 2016, 02:59:51 PM »
Maybe really push the envelope and only mash for 10-15 minutes!?  Just as soon as most of the starches turn to sugars that can be measured by refractometer as approaching the pre-boil OG that you'd anticipated, call it good and start the boil.  Might happen in as little as 10 minutes??  For example, say you wanted a pre-boil gravity of 1.040.  Using refractometer, you can easily test for this every 3-4 minutes if you want.  Then just as soon as you get close, like 1.038 or so, immediately end the mash / heat 'er up to the boil.  What happens to body of the final beer if you do that?????  I have my hypothesis!!!

836
All Grain Brewing / Re: 20 minute beer
« on: March 07, 2016, 02:24:35 PM »
In another thread Dave Taylor suggested I try a 20 minute mash for my American mild.  Seemed interesting but I kinda dismissed it as to far outside the norm....Yeah, I know.  Well, at Club Night at PNWHC last weekend, a guy asked me if I wanted to try his 20 Minute IPA.  So I did...WOW!  It was an amazing beer. 20 min. mash, 20 min. boil!  Heavy FWH then a buttload of hops at flameout.  Fantastic beer!  I wish I would have gotten his name, but if anybody out there knows him, please have him contact me!  This is something I fully intend to try.

Yay, another potential convert.  Certainly worth experimentation by more people.

For the record, I typically would not recommend a 20-minute mash for an IPA.  I'm strictly a 40-minute kind of guy based on tons of experimentation -- just brewed another 40-minute ESB again yesterday and hit 81% brewhouse efficiency, yadda yadda.  But for a small beer like a mild, it might make sense to try a super short mash for bigger body.

EDIT: Okay, so maybe just a touch more background....... the previous thread is here:

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=26118.msg337329#msg337329

837
I'll drink to that.  :)

838
Maybe all 3 of us should put our heads together and see if there's a better way to do this.

I sense an inevitable establishment of either a merger or a mutual respect society of some sort.

Another part of me wishes James Spencer and/or Chris Colby would also jump on board somewheres.  It would be like a non-holy non-trinity at that point... mega nerdy pragmatic awesomeness... jolly good and which no one could deny.

839
I so hope D&D have their IGORs redo this one! I definitely plan to continue playing with it. I only wish there was a better way to get differing CoH levels without using different hops. Hmm.

Yeah... guess you've got to seek out that tincture of pure CoH.  Good luck with that!!  I hear you can get THC though.

When you said D&D, my mind drifted for a second...... almost makes sense, too.  ;)

840
I have long preferred Chinook for bittering APA/AIPA.  When people tell me they use Magnum for those, I kinda wonder why.

It's a purely subjective, eye of the beholder thing.  So that's never gonna be resolved across an entire hobby or industry, that's for sure.

I was just posting on another forum that I use Hallertau for much of my bittering.  Two reasons: 1) I grow my own so I always have some, and 2) because I think Hallertau tastes awesome when used for bittering.  I pick up a lot of flavor from it, and the LONGER it's boiled, not the shorter.  Right wrong indifferent, that's been my experience.  And, hey, I've got several ounces of homegrowns sitting here and it's been like a constant 4.8-5.0% alpha for the past 6 years (or at least it tastes that way to me), so why not.  I've never been impressed when reserving them as late additions, but they're great for all my bittering.

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