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Messages - majorvices

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4081
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Oxyclean and Therminator
« on: July 19, 2013, 02:11:53 AM »
Yeah, the oxidative agent in PBW is, if not the same, very chemically close to oxiclean. FTR you can make homemade PBW by blending oxiclean and TSP substitute. Can't remember the ratio off hand but I think it is 2 parts oxygen cleaner to one part TSP substitute.

4082
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: yeast under pressure
« on: July 18, 2013, 09:55:22 PM »
Too much pressure can damage the yeast, but some breweries ferment under some pressure to minimize ester development. Sounds like you probably caught it in time to save the batch, and the tank (assuming you don't have a pressure reliefe valve).

4083
Going Pro / Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« on: July 18, 2013, 09:39:52 PM »
Why should farmers get more lenient "brewery" regulations that the rest of the people living in NJ?

4084
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry Yeast for a Belgian Dubbel
« on: July 18, 2013, 04:57:06 PM »
I pitch at 64 and never go higher than 68.

4085
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry Yeast for a Belgian Dubbel
« on: July 18, 2013, 03:12:00 PM »
Just to add, the dry Belgian yeasts always taste so phenolic. All band aid no fruit not awful, but not great. that's my experience anyway.

This has been my experience as well.  I have also had issues with WLP500 with this phenolic taste when fermented in the low 60s.  It does fade with age somewhat though.

Interesting. I seem to have the other problem with that strain. Too much bubble gum.

4086
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry Yeast for a Belgian Dubbel
« on: July 18, 2013, 02:45:13 AM »
Just to add, the dry Belgian yeasts always taste so phenolic. All band aid no fruit not awful, but not great. that's my experience anyway.

4087
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry Yeast for a Belgian Dubbel
« on: July 18, 2013, 02:33:39 AM »
Have to thrown hat in the ring: you can't really make a dubbel with a saison strain and expect it to taste like a dubbel. I'm sure it will taste great, but saison strains are way more spicy than regular Trappist style Belgian strains and the flavor just won't be the same.

Have to agree with Denny, too, if you really want to make a great dubble, stick with liquid yeast. If ease of use trumps great flavor, go with the dry Belgian strains. But your gonna be a little disappointed.

4088
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Carbonation
« on: July 16, 2013, 04:13:50 AM »
Beer is a live product. If it sits around for months at room temp and there is stilll yeast in suspension and any fermentable sugars left the yeast will ferment and cause carbonation. Unless its a high gravity beer, in most cases, I would question why you leave it sitting around so long. Drink it fresh and young. That's how its supposed to be consumed. Old beer usually sucks.

4089
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: July 16, 2013, 01:48:30 AM »
The days I am brewing are the days I am happiest. All the CIP, transferring, carbonating, keg-filling, sample-glass washing, scheduling, opening/closing, growler filling, etc. are all the things that wear me down.

Nothing compares to the feeling of eyeing that hydrometer and making a note of the starting gravity before I pitch some yeast. Serious anticipation, pride, and a feeling of a job well done. Then coming in 8 hours later to a serious gurgle in the air-lock bucket is just icing on the cake.

I'm with you. I love brewing. Don't care for much of the other stuff. Luckily I have employees that now clean all kegs (I haven't cleaned a keg in months) and also employees that take care of all tasting room duties. Still wash dishes from time to time, but only to "lead by example", as they say. Wish I had the hassle of filling growlers.
Is that what I need to do now?
Employees?
My original Business Plan was to work 3 days a week.
Boy I was wrong.

Employees are great. You pay yourself a lot less. But I frankly don't want to do all this crap! ;)

4090
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: July 15, 2013, 08:33:44 PM »
If I was an owner of or an investor in the brewery that this author is employed I would let him go.  If it's his brewery he will fail.  There are plenty of people that have this as a passion and have no problem putting in whatever it takes.  I know the owner(s) of breweries here in Indy that were passionate and I mean PASSIONATE about their homebrew(ing).  Best damn homebrew I ever had.  Anyway, they followed that passion and have hugely successful brewing businesses.  When I run into them you know what?  They still have that same passion and love for what they are doing. And they are working their asses off.......

Those people aren't the ones the author is talking about though. It's the guy who never even set foot in a brewery or who has 4 Mr. Beer kits (as mentioned above) under his belt and has decided to open a brewery or apply to Stone.

And really glad you aren't my boss. You're pretty quick to fire someone. Just sayin'. ;)

4091
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: July 15, 2013, 04:48:45 PM »

As a general rule I try to dissuade people from getting into the industry. Especially people who say "I'm going to open a brewery!" because they think they will make lots of money. I know a lot of brewery owners and none of them are rich and all of them made more money before they quit their day job. I make less money now than my first job out of college in 1991, and I work more hours!

I have a 23 year old kid working for me now who wants to open a brewery someday. He wanted to come by to just watch for a day and by the end of the day he was working and hired. I explained to him before the first day that it wasn't probably what he thought it was going to be and that it was hard as hell work. But I really thinks he loves the job, so there are some people out there that are just meant to be brewers. I like to think I one of them, too. :)

Agreed.

Business is tough...and risky. I established a home inspection business that did well. I've recently dissolved that business to start a brewery. Starting a business is no easy endeavor. It takes guts, and passion, not to mention lots of hard work. For me, it really boils down to one thing, and that is self satisfaction. Working for someone else is a lot less work (in many cases), but building a business of your own is much more gratifying in the end. It's definitely a passion, a desire and a LABOR of love.

You will succeed because you are as hard headed and ugly as me! ;) Plus you are a good brewer. Or so I've been told.

4092
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: July 15, 2013, 04:47:21 PM »
I'm with you. I love brewing. Don't care for much of the other stuff. Luckily I have employees that now clean all kegs (I haven't cleaned a keg in months) and also employees that take care of all tasting room duties. Still wash dishes from time to time, but only to "lead by example", as they say. Wish I had the hassle of filling growlers.

After about a thousand the charm of growlers wears off.

I'm sure. But I could use the $$$$. Plus, I'd pay someone to do it. ;)

4093
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: July 15, 2013, 03:45:53 PM »
As a general rule I try to dissuade people from getting into the industry. Especially people who say "I'm going to open a brewery!" because they think they will make lots of money. I know a lot of brewery owners and none of them are rich and all of them made more money before they quit their day job. I make less money now than my first job out of college in 1991, and I work more hours!

Oh, I totally agree.  I was in my LHBS a few months ago, and one of the sales people I know there had just been helping out this customer who was buying his first kit.  This guy had never brewed beer before in his life.  After the guy paid for his kit and left, the sales rep said to me: "that guy scared me!"  I asked why, and he said, "he says he's going to open a brewery."   :o

The worse beer in the industry is from people who had the idea to start a brewery before they learned to brew. And it's epidemic. And it really hurts the craft as a whole.

4094
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: July 15, 2013, 03:39:19 PM »
The days I am brewing are the days I am happiest. All the CIP, transferring, carbonating, keg-filling, sample-glass washing, scheduling, opening/closing, growler filling, etc. are all the things that wear me down.

Nothing compares to the feeling of eyeing that hydrometer and making a note of the starting gravity before I pitch some yeast. Serious anticipation, pride, and a feeling of a job well done. Then coming in 8 hours later to a serious gurgle in the air-lock bucket is just icing on the cake.

I'm with you. I love brewing. Don't care for much of the other stuff. Luckily I have employees that now clean all kegs (I haven't cleaned a keg in months) and also employees that take care of all tasting room duties. Still wash dishes from time to time, but only to "lead by example", as they say. Wish I had the hassle of filling growlers.

4095
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Got beef with "American IPA"
« on: July 14, 2013, 09:23:20 PM »
Brain fart a couple years ago, I typed "Imperial Pale Ale" instead of "India Pale Ale" on my keg ring and didn't even notice it until a few days ago.

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