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Messages - majorvices

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4081
Yeast and Fermentation / age 6 months in bucket, lid won't seal
« on: February 06, 2013, 10:54:57 AM »
The most frequent times I have lost beer it has been due to acetobacter infections in buckets or in plastic fermentors (you don't want to know what it is like to pop the lid on a 10 bbl plastic conical fermentor and witness an acetobacter infection once, let alone twice). It may be a climate issue, some of you may not have problems with it, but it has happened to me enough times that I try to get beer out of plastic as soon as possible.

4082
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 10:34:25 AM »
I do both and I think the time savings of kegging is often overstated.

Clearly some of you  including the author need to lay off the booze! ;) Would take me 20 minutes to clean and sani and fill a corny. 5 minute tops to run acid through my lines. On the times that you need to disassemble a keg it takes all of 5 minutes!

And like I said, for a 10 gallon batch that is 2 hours of constant work hudled on the floor if gravity feeding or standing over the sink if pressure pushing.

No way in hades is the time saving of kegging "overated". I could clean and keg a 10 gallon batch in 30-40 minutes easily! 2 hours at least to handbottle that much and that doesn't count de labeling.

And let's not forget, in most cases kegged beer tastes better!

4083
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 09:30:49 AM »
Haven't read the post yet but if anyone thinks you don't save time kegging over bottling they're definitely "mad". Takes 10-15 minutes to strip apart a corny and another 10-15 minutes to rack. And I would argue it isn't necessary to strip apart a corny every time. I also think homebrewed draft beer often tastes better than homebrew bottled beer due to oxidation in bottled beer.
FWIW - there is also filling CO2 tanks, cleaning draft lines, maybe carbonating if you do a shake method ... But for me the biggest time-suck of bottling is delabelling bottles. If I were buying nice new bottles it would be faster, but more expensive. Then again, my kegs/kegorator cost as much as dozens of cases of bottles.

Still, bottling 5 gallons is a 1+ hour job just to put the beer in the bottles. I think it is longer than that even. And it is harder work than kegging, regardless of the time saving.

4084
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 09:29:27 AM »
These are 2 that I always bring up...

"Craft brewers do (insert technique) or use (insert equipment) so homebrewers should aspire to as well"

"Boiling wort for a long time caramelizes it"

But, OTOH, all probrewers should have a 600+ gallon blue cooler and batch sparge. :D

4085
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 08:58:31 AM »
Haven't read the post yet but if anyone thinks you don't save time kegging over bottling they're definitely "mad". Takes 10-15 minutes to strip apart a corny and another 10-15 minutes to rack. And I would argue it isn't necessary to strip apart a corny every time. I also think homebrewed draft beer often tastes better than homebrew bottled beer due to oxidation in bottled beer.

4086
All Grain Brewing / salt additions
« on: February 05, 2013, 07:53:55 PM »
....and, the lower pH of the mash will help dissolve the salts. ;)

4087
General Homebrew Discussion / Homebrewer turned pro in LA(Lower Alabama)
« on: February 05, 2013, 07:36:02 PM »
Just depends on the beer but most 1.050 lagers don't taste green at all after, say 10-14 days of fermentation (or until it is done) and 1-2 weeks of lagering at close to 30 degrees. Lagers do take longer to ferment and the lagering period is important but there's no reason to lager a Helles or Kolsch for 4+ weeks.

If your fermentation takes 4 week you probably should be pitching more yeast or aerating more thoroughly, but most likely you are just not in a hurry which is one of the luxuries of homebrewing. Commercial breweries can't take that type of luxury, they need to move beer as quickly through fermentors and BBTs as possible.

4088
General Homebrew Discussion / Homebrewer turned pro in LA(Lower Alabama)
« on: February 05, 2013, 03:54:13 PM »
Plus, in my case the distributor keeps beer in their cold room for up to 6 months before it gets delivered to accounts. No need for long bulk aging.

4089
General Homebrew Discussion / Homebrewer turned pro in LA(Lower Alabama)
« on: February 05, 2013, 02:58:59 PM »
No. Cold crash to 38 for 3-5 days, bright in BBT for about 3 days. That's standard for all my ales. But I have been telling people that some of the extra aging we do on ales and lagers is a waste of time for years before I started my brewery. It's just not often needed.

4090
All Grain Brewing / salt additions
« on: February 05, 2013, 12:30:10 PM »
The lower pH of the mash should dissolve the gypsum and other salts better than the high pH of the water. I would recommend adding the salts to the mash, not the HLT.

4091
All Grain Brewing / beer changes flavor
« on: February 05, 2013, 11:36:38 AM »
Hmmm. . . another thread got me thinking.  What is the temp/pressure on the kegs?  Pushing with too much CO2 is fine short term, but long term it leads to over carbonation.  Over carbonation can kill aromas and if there is enough carbonic acid there will be a common off flavor in the beers.

Good catch. Especially with hoppy beers.

4092
Yeast and Fermentation / age 6 months in bucket, lid won't seal
« on: February 05, 2013, 10:57:36 AM »
I wouldn't store any beer in a bucket for 6 weeks, let alone 6 months!

4093
General Homebrew Discussion / Homebrewer turned pro in LA(Lower Alabama)
« on: February 05, 2013, 07:54:39 AM »
Yeah, I think 90% of small craft breweries across teh country make ales over lagers. Nothing to do with cost of refrigeration, my glycol unit can easily handle the temps, it's the time factor and the larger expense on yeast.

We plan on doing lagers eventually but right now I use a German ale yeast for my "lagerish" beers.

4094
The Pub / The OFFICIAL AHA 4M's NFL BULL SH$%^&TER'S THREAD!
« on: February 05, 2013, 07:14:12 AM »
Well that link didn't work. I just don't understand the You Tubes.

Do a search on "Bad Lip Syncing NFL". Hysterical.

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