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Messages - majorvices

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4126
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 07, 2013, 08:39:42 AM »


Except: You aren't factoring in your labor let alone your equipment. Homebrew is some of the most expensive beer in the world.

i guess i shouldn't be mowing my own lawn either, because the amount of money i could earn during that time is way more than what i pay the kid down the street. ;D,  not many hobbies are cheap. this one can be expensive or not.  my lbhs has a huge ss blichman kettle for 700 bucks.  my kettle bought at a goodwill store for three bucks.  add another 20 tops for the electric element not so much.

Time is money my friend. Just because you enjoy doing it doesn't mean you are spending it ... or even spending it wisely. ;)

4127
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 07, 2013, 06:57:28 AM »
There's a tremendous amount of myth out there. It seems like every time a few get knocked down and everybody agrees they are not based in fact a couple new ones pop up. It's like a hydra of stupid.  :-\

I've only bottled my beers and I don't see it as that big of a pain. Like anything else in homebrewing there's ways to trim time if you really want (e.g. leaving the damn labels on the bottles). I'm not anti-kegging by any means but I'd say I could probably prep and bottle beer almost as quickly as you could clean a keg, sanitize, fill and pressurize. I don't think the time saving is immense. That's what I took his point to be but I might have undersold it to myself. I dunno, I'm not anti-kegging in the least. I own a couple cornys I bought cheaply a couple years ago I'm still using as fermentors because I don't have the space for a tap set up right now.

OK, I'll just say it just one more time then drop it. Kegging 10 gallons (including cleaning and sanitizing kegs) 30-40 minutes. Bottling 10 gallon, 2 - 2.5 hours. I guess to me that is a big time saver. Just sayin'. ;)

4128
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 09:08:32 PM »
How about the big one? Home brewing saves money.

This needs moderated before our wives/girlfriends see it!  :)

My most recent commercial brew purchases were a pack of Westy XII, and several bottles of Allagash Confluence & Interlude from a few different vintages. My last batch of homebrew cost me about 20 bucks for 3 gallons. I'd say that's a huge cost savings right there :)

Except: You aren't factoring in your labor let alone your equipment. Homebrew is some of the most expensive beer in the world.

4129
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 02:12:34 PM »
Two weeks ago I had the last bottle of an old ale I brewed in 2006, how many people still have beers they kegged more than six years ago?

I still have a keg of 2007 Barleywine with about a gallon left in it.  I really need to bottle the leftovers but I keep putting it off.  Maybe I'll bottle the rest up and submit some to NHC this year.

I doubt many people have beers that old in kegs.  I think my next oldest is probably from 2009

I guess I can say it too! :) I have a keg of RIS from 2006 that is about 1/2 full and another keg of Old Ale from 2007. I drank my last two bottles of 2006 Bruised Bare Knuckles barley wine this last year. But I do have other odd assorted bottles ranging back to that time period.

4130
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 01:22:42 PM »
I do agree that for higher co2 level beers kegs make it challenging to serve via draft, such as belgians and hefeweizens. Not impossible though if you have a restrictor or 30 ft bev line.

Still going to have to vehemently disagree with your assertion that kegging and bottling have near equal time frames. Just doesn't work that way for me and never has!

4131
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 11:00:54 AM »
And let's not forget, in most cases kegged beer tastes better!

REALLY struggling to find an example of when bottle conditioning produces better beer than draft.

I don't buy it for sours or high-gravity, "ageable" beers. Unless you're trying to save cellar space or don't want to invest in kegs to age beers.

The only example I can think of is possibly barley wine. It's the only beer I find that I really enjoy bottle aged. But even then the C02 level can sometimes be tricky.

4132
Yeast and Fermentation / age 6 months in bucket, lid won't seal
« on: February 06, 2013, 10:54:57 AM »
The most frequent times I have lost beer it has been due to acetobacter infections in buckets or in plastic fermentors (you don't want to know what it is like to pop the lid on a 10 bbl plastic conical fermentor and witness an acetobacter infection once, let alone twice). It may be a climate issue, some of you may not have problems with it, but it has happened to me enough times that I try to get beer out of plastic as soon as possible.

4133
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 10:34:25 AM »
I do both and I think the time savings of kegging is often overstated.

Clearly some of you  including the author need to lay off the booze! ;) Would take me 20 minutes to clean and sani and fill a corny. 5 minute tops to run acid through my lines. On the times that you need to disassemble a keg it takes all of 5 minutes!

And like I said, for a 10 gallon batch that is 2 hours of constant work hudled on the floor if gravity feeding or standing over the sink if pressure pushing.

No way in hades is the time saving of kegging "overated". I could clean and keg a 10 gallon batch in 30-40 minutes easily! 2 hours at least to handbottle that much and that doesn't count de labeling.

And let's not forget, in most cases kegged beer tastes better!

4134
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 09:30:49 AM »
Haven't read the post yet but if anyone thinks you don't save time kegging over bottling they're definitely "mad". Takes 10-15 minutes to strip apart a corny and another 10-15 minutes to rack. And I would argue it isn't necessary to strip apart a corny every time. I also think homebrewed draft beer often tastes better than homebrew bottled beer due to oxidation in bottled beer.
FWIW - there is also filling CO2 tanks, cleaning draft lines, maybe carbonating if you do a shake method ... But for me the biggest time-suck of bottling is delabelling bottles. If I were buying nice new bottles it would be faster, but more expensive. Then again, my kegs/kegorator cost as much as dozens of cases of bottles.

Still, bottling 5 gallons is a 1+ hour job just to put the beer in the bottles. I think it is longer than that even. And it is harder work than kegging, regardless of the time saving.

4135
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 09:29:27 AM »
These are 2 that I always bring up...

"Craft brewers do (insert technique) or use (insert equipment) so homebrewers should aspire to as well"

"Boiling wort for a long time caramelizes it"

But, OTOH, all probrewers should have a 600+ gallon blue cooler and batch sparge. :D

4136
General Homebrew Discussion / The Mad Fermentationist's Top 10 Myths
« on: February 06, 2013, 08:58:31 AM »
Haven't read the post yet but if anyone thinks you don't save time kegging over bottling they're definitely "mad". Takes 10-15 minutes to strip apart a corny and another 10-15 minutes to rack. And I would argue it isn't necessary to strip apart a corny every time. I also think homebrewed draft beer often tastes better than homebrew bottled beer due to oxidation in bottled beer.

4137
All Grain Brewing / salt additions
« on: February 05, 2013, 07:53:55 PM »
....and, the lower pH of the mash will help dissolve the salts. ;)

4138
General Homebrew Discussion / Homebrewer turned pro in LA(Lower Alabama)
« on: February 05, 2013, 07:36:02 PM »
Just depends on the beer but most 1.050 lagers don't taste green at all after, say 10-14 days of fermentation (or until it is done) and 1-2 weeks of lagering at close to 30 degrees. Lagers do take longer to ferment and the lagering period is important but there's no reason to lager a Helles or Kolsch for 4+ weeks.

If your fermentation takes 4 week you probably should be pitching more yeast or aerating more thoroughly, but most likely you are just not in a hurry which is one of the luxuries of homebrewing. Commercial breweries can't take that type of luxury, they need to move beer as quickly through fermentors and BBTs as possible.

4139
General Homebrew Discussion / Homebrewer turned pro in LA(Lower Alabama)
« on: February 05, 2013, 03:54:13 PM »
Plus, in my case the distributor keeps beer in their cold room for up to 6 months before it gets delivered to accounts. No need for long bulk aging.

4140
General Homebrew Discussion / Homebrewer turned pro in LA(Lower Alabama)
« on: February 05, 2013, 02:58:59 PM »
No. Cold crash to 38 for 3-5 days, bright in BBT for about 3 days. That's standard for all my ales. But I have been telling people that some of the extra aging we do on ales and lagers is a waste of time for years before I started my brewery. It's just not often needed.

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