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Messages - majorvices

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61
Ingredients / Re: Prepping oak spirals
« on: August 08, 2015, 04:54:27 AM »
For Brett I use a more neutral barrel generally and will go a lot longer. I do have a beer that I aged with a spire that is a brett and lacto/pedio beer that I aged in a carboy for years and it is less oaky that you would suspect so there may be something to that.

62
Ingredients / Re: Prepping oak spirals
« on: August 07, 2015, 03:49:36 AM »
After about 4 months I don't think you will have much desireable character left in the wood. If you take a spire or cubes or chips and put them in a clear spirit you will notice that the spirit will darken very quickly for the first week or two then slowly darken more over time.

63
The Pub / Re: Vacation stop Suggestions
« on: August 06, 2015, 06:35:53 PM »
Man, I just can't stand more than a couple ounces of Lazy Magnolia Southern Pecan.

64
Ingredients / Re: Prepping oak spirals
« on: August 06, 2015, 04:54:05 PM »
I go by smell, at 400 you will get some eye burning smoke so have some fans going. I have let it go as long as 2 hours before.

65
Equipment and Software / Re: Gravity measuring BS
« on: August 06, 2015, 04:53:02 PM »
Be sure there is no water in your sample pulling device. If there is some water or sanitizer in there it will throw off your reading. Sometimes a bit of sanitizer gets trapped in the pocket of my zwickle and if I take a sample I have to run out a half pint because the reading will be off. I also recently switched to a digital refractometer that is way more accurate than the old hand held one. Expensive but way worth it!

66
The Pub / Re: Vacation stop Suggestions
« on: August 06, 2015, 04:49:24 PM »
The only brewery I know of down that way would be "Fairhope Brewery", I know some of the owners. (It's basically a suburb of Mobile) Nice guys. Beers aren't always great but some are ok. BTW: You can get Yellowhammer in Mobile. ;)

67
Ingredients / Re: Prepping oak spirals
« on: August 06, 2015, 04:47:32 PM »
I like to get medium toast and put it in the over at 400 degrees until I get the color I want. I like the vanilla character you get out of that dark of a toast. That's the best way to sanitize them too, if you are worried about that. I have also just thrown them straight in the fermentor with fine results (though I did get an infection doing that with chips once.)
I didn't think of the ole oven.  If they're already medium toast spirals, I'm assuming a bake at 250° or so wouldn't change that much? 

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

I would assume you would need at least 40 minutes at that temp, but I'm not sure exactly on the time for sanitizing, but I'm pretty confident that would work. Depends on what you want. Check this chart out though


68
Ingredients / Re: Prepping oak spirals
« on: August 06, 2015, 03:52:26 PM »
I like to get medium toast and put it in the over at 400 degrees until I get the color I want. I like the vanilla character you get out of that dark of a toast. That's the best way to sanitize them too, if you are worried about that. I have also just thrown them straight in the fermentor with fine results (though I did get an infection doing that with chips once.)

69
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Anti oxidation ideas
« on: August 05, 2015, 05:17:23 AM »
Avoid large quantities of crystal malts. The other day I had to dump an IPA from The Kernel, one of the best new breweries in the UK. Hadn't checked the date, had been brewed six months before. Undrinkable, I think because of the crystal malts.

But that has nothing to do with oxidation.  In fact, there's one school of thought that says crystal can help prevent oxidation.   I have np problem with beers with larger amounts of crystal if the rest of the recipe balances it.

This is something I have to disagree with. Everything I have read regarding recent information says that crystal malts, especially darker crystal malts, reduce shelf life due to oxidation issues. And usually hoppy beers paired with dark crystal malts are just plain bad. I would say "every" but I will leave out a few possible exceptions for beers I haven't tried.

70
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Ageing times
« on: August 05, 2015, 04:48:08 AM »
yeah, 3 - 4 weeks after fermentation is over usually does the trick. They often tend to get better as they age as well. I brew small batches of barley wines just for me that I ferment in 5 gallon buckets then age for a year in corny keg before bottling.

71
Wood/Casks / Re: Woodinville Whiskey Co. Barrel
« on: August 04, 2015, 03:41:12 AM »
The sour guys (Rare Barrel, Crooked Stave, etc) are storing their barrels with a solution of 2 gm potasium metabisulfate 1 gm citric acid per liter water until ready to use, 4-6 months. Replace with fresh if storing longer. Rinse thoroughly before filling.

This is what I do if storing long term, but you can also just go right in the barrel with another beer if you have one in waiting. That's what I try to do.

72
Wood/Casks / Re: Woodinville Whiskey Co. Barrel
« on: August 03, 2015, 06:30:50 PM »
I don't think you will notice this being a problem. But I guarantee if you wait too long to pull the beer out of the barrel you will wish this was the case!

73
Wood/Casks / Re: Woodinville Whiskey Co. Barrel
« on: August 03, 2015, 04:35:49 PM »
I'm on about the 5th beer aging in these barrels, trust me, it can get over oaked very quickly. The best way to go about it is taste. But 4 weeks will be pushing it. Personally, I find most commercial breweries over age their beers in barrels as well. I pull mind a lot sooner than others. Sometimes, even in a 60 gallon bbl you can pull it after 4-6 weeks.

I'm not saying it won't taste overoaked after about 4 weeks. I'm saying it comes through that and into something better after a few more weeks. There was a presentation at NHC 2013 about alternative wood ageing and the presenter went into the specifics of it.

That doesn't match my experience at all. One of the major problems you are overlooking is also oxidation. beer that has sat in bbls too long turns into an oxidated mess. I have a small barrel program at Yellowhammer and in my experience it is very critical to taste and pull the beer at the right time or you will ruin it.

If anyone get's a copy of "New Brewer" look at the barrel aging article by the guy over their program at Avery brewing. It's a very good article and echoes what I'm saying. Even in 60 gallon barrels I find that often I have enough wood balance after 4-6 weeks.

74
The Pub / Re: Hangin at Yellowhammer
« on: August 03, 2015, 08:21:35 AM »
here's beer porn for you hoosier! ;)


75
Wood/Casks / Re: Woodinville Whiskey Co. Barrel
« on: August 03, 2015, 08:18:25 AM »
I'm on about the 5th beer aging in these barrels, trust me, it can get over oaked very quickly. The best way to go about it is taste. But 4 weeks will be pushing it. Personally, I find most commercial breweries over age their beers in barrels as well. I pull mind a lot sooner than others. Sometimes, even in a 60 gallon bbl you can pull it after 4-6 weeks.

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