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Messages - phunhog

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / NHC San Diego- Can't decide.......
« on: May 05, 2015, 07:54:08 AM »
Hey guys,
Can't believe I am even writing this but I am having a hard time convincing myself to go to the NHC in San Diego. I have never been to a NHC and I only live 3.5 hours from San Diego so it would seem like a slam dunk. Between the cost of the conference, hotel room, meals, and time away from the family.... The biggest draw for me is the presentations....but the AHA puts those online. I am sure the beers are great.....but I will spending several hundred dollars to drink homebrew? So past attendees....PLEASE convince me to go!! What am I missing here?

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: AHA Membership tax deductible?
« on: March 24, 2015, 09:27:02 AM »
Awww man.....thought I might be able to squeeze another deduction in there. ;)

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: step infusion mash for german pils
« on: March 23, 2015, 04:26:35 PM »
I have done a step mash 130-146-158 for my last two german lagers after reading Gordon Strong's book.  It is still early but I am happy with how both beers (Kellerbier and a Helles) have turned out.

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General Homebrew Discussion / AHA Membership tax deductible?
« on: March 23, 2015, 04:01:22 PM »
Had my dreaded tax appt. this morning.  My CPA always ask about non profit donations and memberships.  It wasn't until the ride home that it dawned on me that a. the AHA is a non profit and b. I am a member.  So I think it would be a legitimate tax deduction for next year right?  It then got me thinking about the upcoming NHC in San Diego.  If I donate beer (Club Night) to a non profit (AHA) for their meeting (NHC) and I get nothing in return( still have to pay my own way in) wouldn't that also be a tax deduction for brewing supplies?  I am sure someone here is a CPA.....

5
Homebrew Clubs / Re: Not for profit, ein, or nothing?
« on: March 18, 2015, 09:13:10 PM »
In CA the homebrewing law was changed so you could run a non profit members only brewery/brew club.  I am actually surprised the law is as liberal as it is .  Basically 2x a year your non profit brew club can host an event where you can legally sell your beer.  Now the caveat is that only "bona fide members" can attend but as long someone pays their seperate membership dues.....they are a "bona fide member".  There are some other minor stipulations as well.  It would be a great way to raise money for your non profit brewery/ brew club.

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Ingredients / Hallertauer Mittelfrüh = Spicy?
« on: March 15, 2015, 02:38:57 PM »
So I made a Kellerbier using Hallertauer Mittelfrüh. The recipe came from a Zymurgy article a few issues back, basically it is a hoppy, amber german style lager.  Maybe I have never experienced that much Hallertauer Mittelfrüh late hopping but the spicy note is off the chart....I would say it is almost a " chile pepper" type of spicy. Not hot obviously but spicy if that makes any sense.  Has anyone ever encountered that before? I will try to dig up the recipe..

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Session Saison?
« on: March 08, 2015, 10:11:42 AM »
I have made a Grissette which is sort of like a Session Saison.....damn tasty beer!

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Looking for feedback
« on: March 08, 2015, 10:10:33 AM »
As everyone has already said you have to check out your local laws...they always seem to be the most restrictive.  My city won't let me use my detached garage for a business without a zoning variance (expensive).  In the mean time work within the laws to see what you can do!!  In California we have a great, newer law that allows homebrewers to donate beer to charity events.  It allows you to brew more often and your beer gets some exposure to people other than just your friends.  We sell brewery schwag at these events to absorb some of our costs.  It HAS opened my eyes to the amount of work it takes to operate a commercial brewery.  Just not sure it's worth it. My plan B is to just make my garage into an awesome underground tap room for family and friends.  The general public can continue to drink my beers at charity events. 

9
Absolutely take the high road. What I am saying is make the responsible agency cancel the homebrew comp via some sort of specific written documentation.  That plays much better in the media than a bunch of homebrewers deciding not to have it.  Besides do they "really" respect the law when it clearly says only "native grown products" can be used.   That seems pretty cut and dry...only Idaho hops, barley, yeast and water can be used. Pretty ridiculous

I just don't see the point in going that far until he tries a more conventional route.  You catch more flies with honey, ya know...
I wouldn't be combative about it, but as a regulatory agency it's their job to tell people if what they want to do complies with law. It basically IS the conventional route.
I am sure if varies by state but here in CA the ABC is strictly a regulatory agency.  They don't make laws...they enforce the laws.  However the CA ABC has quite a reputation for trying to "make laws" based on how they choose to interpret the law.   So it is not so cut and dry as far as needing to change a law.  Really many, many times all we need is a more favorable ruling not a full blown law change. Of course it is doubtful the ABC will do that just because some homebrewers want a change. That is where the political pressure and media exposure help.  But that DOES mean that someone has to challenge the ABC and not just roll over.

10
So I am probably in the minority here but.....what would happen if you went ahead with your competition plans as usual?  Call their bluff if you will.  Make them enforce their interpretation of the law and then use it for good PR....something like "Long standing Idaho State Fair tradition cancelled due to law interpretation". That will get many more people/politicians to take notice and you have a better shot at getting the law changed.

Because he respects the law and doesn't want to be a jerk?  We didn't have to do anything here to get the law changed without a single negative vote anywhere in the process.  Why not take the high road?

Absolutely take the high road. What I am saying is make the responsible agency cancel the homebrew comp via some sort of specific written documentation.  That plays much better in the media than a bunch of homebrewers deciding not to have it.  Besides do they "really" respect the law when it clearly says only "native grown products" can be used.   That seems pretty cut and dry...only Idaho hops, barley, yeast and water can be used. Pretty ridiculous

11
So I am probably in the minority here but.....what would happen if you went ahead with your competition plans as usual? 

Maybe a nice criminal record for all involved...

So why wouldn't they prosecute them for past competitions?  Unless the law was recently changed the competitions have always been illegal.  Is ignorance a defense?

On another note it appears that only "native grown products" can be used in Idaho homebrewing.  How can they possibly enforce that?

12
So I am probably in the minority here but.....what would happen if you went ahead with your competition plans as usual?  Call their bluff if you will.  Make them enforce their interpretation of the law and then use it for good PR....something like "Long standing Idaho State Fair tradition cancelled due to law interpretation". That will get many more people/politicians to take notice and you have a better shot at getting the law changed.   

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Can a boil be too vigorous?
« on: February 19, 2015, 07:55:57 AM »
I have always wondered what is most important...the vigor of the boil or the temperature.  I live/brew at sea level but what about brewers in the mountains?  Water boils at under 200 F. at 6000 ft. so obviously their boil is going to be 12 degrees F less than mine.  Does that mean I could get "boil" at 200 degrees as well?  Or is there something important that happens with the actual boiling that isn't necessarily temperature dependent?

14
The Pub / Re: Beer Excise tax legislation
« on: February 16, 2015, 07:40:43 PM »
15,000 BBL is a lot of beer to sell if you ask me.
Thirsty...you are a pro brewer right?  Love to hear your take on it! Why would the BA draft legislation that only cuts small brewers taxes in half when the competing legislation eliminates it completely?  For a small brewery I can only imagine how huge that would be to not pay federal excise taxes.

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The Pub / Re: Beer Excise tax legislation
« on: February 16, 2015, 07:27:28 PM »
Think about the incentives under the big beer plan -- no excise tax as long as you stay small and then bam!, hit with a huge tax burden as soon as you hit 15,001. Your incentive is to stay under that 15K. I'd prefer to be paying a small rate  starting out, so I could go up to 60K and not worry about the increase in tax.

I am not so sure about that.  I am guessing it is like the federal income tax. You start paying tax on every barrel of beer over 15k.  So if you produced 16k bbl you would only be taxed on 1k bbl. 
It just seems like the vast majority of craft breweries are easily under 15k bbl.  So they would pay no excise tax!  Under the BA plan a 10k bbl craft brewery would pay 35k in excise taxes yet under the "Big Beer"  bill the same craft brewery would pay nothing!  Like I said I must be missing something since I can't imagine the BA would have a worse plan for small breweries.

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