Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - phunhog

Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8] 9 10 ... 16
106
Going Pro / Re: Brewing Education
« on: April 23, 2013, 08:59:02 AM »
Something that I considered, when I had the opportunity to start a brewery: There are a lot of out of work brewers in the world. They don't make much money. So hire one to train you, pay them enough to cover relocation expenses, if necessary. If you guys work well together maybe keep them on, because if you're busy you'll need the help.

That's a really good idea!! Maybe you can even find an experienced local brewer who wants to make a little money on the side as a consultant.  Somebody who can teach you some bare bones brewery operations (CIP, kegging, filtering, etc..).  I would think that most of those practices are somewhat standarized throughout the industry. 

107
Homebrew Competitions / Re: NHC regional experiences
« on: April 22, 2013, 11:51:00 AM »
I believe that all the 1st round judging has taken place right?  Does that mean maybe this week the AHA will post 1st round results?  May 4th is too far away!! :(

108
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The journey
« on: April 21, 2013, 12:11:39 PM »
I have been brewing pretty regularly for the last 5 years and I still feel the same way you do.  This hobby really is limitless!! Plus there are so many different facets of it that keep it interesting ( biology,  water chemistry, building brewing stuff/gadgets, political/business side of it, unique/historical beer styles, and on and on.  Glad you see it as a journey and not a destination. I think a  lot of people want to brew killer beer RIGHT NOW and don't understand that it is sometime a lengthy process to get to that point.

109
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Second thoughts on brewing
« on: April 19, 2013, 05:43:34 PM »
Just make a big ice bath and you will be good to go!!  My biggest piece of advice is to put your carboy/bucket into a water bath to try and maintain fermentation temps. It WILL make a ton of difference in your final beer. Have fun!!

110
Events / Re: LA Vegan Beer fest
« on: April 19, 2013, 05:12:14 PM »
If I were you I would head north and attend the Southern California Homebrewers Festival instead ;)

111
Going Pro / Re: What Am I Missing in This Artcle?
« on: April 17, 2013, 12:55:35 PM »
I agree. That is why I suggested that if you want to open a pico/nano brewery to make your money somewhere else first.  That way the brewery can essentially stay a hobby and not become a "job" since you aren't relying on it for your income.

I've often thought, whilst brewing, that a lot of local, state and federal paperwork would make my hobby so much better.
No doubt to get that there is a lot of paperwork up front. Once you get going though I have heard that it isn't bad at all.

112
Going Pro / Re: What Am I Missing in This Artcle?
« on: April 17, 2013, 10:19:10 AM »
I think breweries better get used to getting a smaller and smaller piece of the market share. Part of the problem is that everyone thinks they are going to make money with a brewery....at least enough to support themselves.  This is where I think we can learn from the wine industry. Many, in fact I would say most, wineries/vineyards are started by people who made their money somewhere else.  I have looking at the plethora of new wineries in my general area and most, if not all, are started by people in their 40's-60's.  Most are only open 3 days a week and have very limited distribution.  I see this as the future of breweries.....not a 15bbl brewery that is trying to get their beer in every store, bar, and restaurant in sight.

I hear what you are saying except they are two entirely different business models. How many people are going out to local pubs and ordering local wines? How long does it take to produce a wine as opposed to a beer? I think there are things in both industries that can be borrowed and/or copied, but at the crux of the issue they are two different business models entirely.

IMO you have a lot of pico breweries who are either going to succeed because they have great beer and great passion to work for pennies or are going to fail because, regardless of the quality of the beer the brewers are going to decide the passion is not worth the loss of freetime and weekends.

I agree. That is why I suggested that if you want to open a pico/nano brewery to make your money somewhere else first.  That way the brewery can essentially stay a hobby and not become a "job" since you aren't relying on it for your income. 

113
Going Pro / Re: What Am I Missing in This Artcle?
« on: April 16, 2013, 09:40:04 AM »
I think breweries better get used to getting a smaller and smaller piece of the market share. Part of the problem is that everyone thinks they are going to make money with a brewery....at least enough to support themselves.  This is where I think we can learn from the wine industry. Many, in fact I would say most, wineries/vineyards are started by people who made their money somewhere else.  I have looking at the plethora of new wineries in my general area and most, if not all, are started by people in their 40's-60's.  Most are only open 3 days a week and have very limited distribution.  I see this as the future of breweries.....not a 15bbl brewery that is trying to get their beer in every store, bar, and restaurant in sight.

114
Going Pro / Re: What Am I Missing in This Artcle?
« on: April 15, 2013, 10:58:15 PM »
That's probably not a typo. All the cool kids are starting severely under-capitalized breweries.

I wonder if all these new "pro" brewers will siphon off business from properly run breweries, ruining not just their own business, but several others as well. Hopefully they'll go under quickly enough that the good breweries who deserve the business can stay afloat.

I don't know if the crappy breweries will necessarily hurt the good breweries. Craft beer is here to stay. It may not grow as fast as it has been but it ain't going away either.  If someone experiences crappy beer at a local brewery I seriously doubt they will swear off beer all together. If anything they will gravitate towards the better breweries and the problem will work itself out.  I do agree that a lot of new breweries are under capitalized.  One just went under in my area. Although I am hesitant to call it a "brewery" since their beers were contract brewed 100 miles away. In the end it just didn't pay the bills to make it worthwhile. Too bad, because even though it was brewed on contract, the beer was pretty good.

115
Going Pro / Re: Homebrew clubs
« on: March 08, 2013, 01:51:57 PM »
Don't probrewers have their own competitions? It sounds kinda like those weird college guys who still hang out at their high school.

I don't know if it is possible but I would love it if some enterprising homebrewer got his beer into the GABF and won!!  With all the nanobreweries popping up I think it is in the realm of possibility..... ;)

116
Going Pro / Re: Homebrew clubs
« on: March 08, 2013, 11:15:28 AM »
In collegiate cycling they let professionals compete. Obviously, they were really fast, and obviously, it really sucked to compete against them if you weren't a professional. So, I don't really think it's appropriate for probrewers to enter homebrew comps at all, regardless of what equipment they use.

I agree.  Don't we always say that it isn't the equipment that makes great beer but rather the brewers' knowledge, skills, and ability.  I am going to make a BIG assumption that if someone is a professional brewer that they already have that going for them.

117
Homebrew Clubs / Re: Homebrew Club Running a Nano-Brewery
« on: March 07, 2013, 02:38:18 PM »
In our case, Rogue bought a 30 gal. MoreBeer sculpture (top of the line) and put it in the basement of their local brewpub.  They also bout a temp controlled conical for the system.  Our people would go in and brew using ingredients supplied by Rogue.  Generally, they were pretty good about getting ingredients that were needed, but sometimes we just had to wing it.  The finished beer was owned and sold by Rogue.  Even the club member who brewed it had to purchase it...no free beer for the club.  They were supposed to have a tap handle available for us all the time, but often their own beer would fill that while ours sat until there was space.  They did no identification kf the beer as being brewed by the club.  Basically, we were just providing free labor.  We recently decided to end our brewing on the system because we just couldn't identify the value to the club.
I am hoping we can convince the brewery where our club meets to do something like this!! I think it would because they are not only a brewery but also a homebrew shop.  It seems like it would be a win/win for the brewery. They get to put a "special" beer on tap for a day or two and get more people into the hobby. 

118
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Souring a Berliner Weisse
« on: March 07, 2013, 07:39:26 AM »
That Zymurgy article also has syrup recipes that I am going to try.  When sour mashing, how do you sanitize the mash tun following the souring?  I would need to use a picnic cooler to hope to maintain temps....but I would hate to have a permanent sour only vessel.

I am going to make my first BW using an old mashtun/picnic cooler to maintain temps.  I wouldn't think it would be a big deal if it did get contaminated. Anything that comes out of that will eventually be boiled for  at least 60 minutes...not to mention that any mash is only going to last 60 minutes. That wouldnt be enough time( I don't think) to pick up any lacto sourness.

119
Homebrew Clubs / Re: Homebrew Club Running a Nano-Brewery
« on: March 05, 2013, 10:35:00 PM »
Thanks you all for the continued input!

Tim Schmidlin - You mentioned the club brewing at a brewery.  Yes, this is what I had in mind. We have a brewery in town that is very homebrewer friendly.  If the club could set up a nano within the brewery as a separate entity, then we could put one or more beers on tap at the brewery and/or a local pub, who also is very supportive of the club. This would be the so called "commercial" face of the club which would allow us to serve and donate beer to charity events, and recruit new members of course. Granted, the beer served at the events would have to be brewed at the nano. Might be a big headache and cost prohibative to do this, but I feel it's worth exploring anyway.

Denny Conn - Your club seemed to have done something similar. I would like to hear more detail about this if you can post about it.

By the way, here's how the California law is written (it's definitely up for interpretation):

Note: I removed a couple of paragraphs that dealt with wine making.

Code 23356.2 states:

No license or permit shall be required for the brewing
of beer for personal or family use, and not for sale, by a person over the age of 21
years. The aggregate amount of beer with respect to any household shall not exceed
(a) 200 gallons per calendar year if there are two or more adults in such household,
or (b) 100 gallons per calendar year if there is only one adult in such household.
Any beer brewed pursuant to this section may be removed from the premises where
brewed for use in competition at organized affairs, exhibitions or competitions, including
homemakers’ contests, tastings, or judgings.

Maybe the best solution would be talk to festival organizers and have them add "Homebrew Competition" to the beer fest title.  Then people attending could vote for their favorite homebrewed beer.  Wouldn't this make it a "Competition at an organized affair"?

Cheers,
Dave
You are absolutely right that it is up for interpretation!! There is a "mobile" brew pub in SF(Brewtruc) that was letting homebrewers pour their beer at various charity beer gardens.  Everyone who attended could vote for their favorite beer and give feedback. Thus meeting, in their eyes, the letter of the law since it was a competition/judging.  I guess CA ABC got wind of it and said that a contest could only have "5-7 judges"!!  Talk about pulling something out of their arse...no where in the law does it stipulate the number of judges permitted in a homebrew competition.
As far a charity event being structured like the NHC...it already exists. The California Homebrewers Assoc. is a legitimate 501(c) charity whose primary purpose, as far as I can tell, is to put on two homebrew festivals a year.  Here's the catch....it is free to members (40 dollar annual dues). Of course the only real benefit to being a "member" is "free" entry to the festival. Technically they sell memberships instead of tickets. In fact they aren't allowed to sell tickets, I mean memberships ;), at the gate. Check it out..http://www.calhomebrewers.org/

120
Events / Re: NHC 2013 Entry Problems - Possible Solutions?
« on: March 05, 2013, 11:27:04 AM »
It is my understanding that the NHC competition is a revenue neutral program for the AHA. In other words.....they don't make any money on it. All proceeds go to pay Janis' salary and other competition related expenses. If the entry fees went up I could see several positive effects. First off the AHA could lower the annual membership dues, thus bringing in more new members. This will increase the presence of the AHA and help in its' lobbying efforts (this should be the number one goal of the AHA IMO).  The additional money raised could also be used to hire some more staff to help run the NHC comp and maybe kickdown some additional money to the judging sites. Sweeten the pot if you will.  It just seems a shame for the AHA to be sitting on a goldmine of potential revenue that could be used to strengthen OUR membership and not take advantage of it. Essentially use the NHC comp as a fundraiser for the AHA!!

Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8] 9 10 ... 16