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Messages - Thirsty_Monk

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Delay in pitching yeast
« on: May 23, 2015, 11:48:35 AM »

Yep, no big deal to go as long as 12 hours. It's better to wait 12 hours and pitch at the proper temp (below 70 for most ales) than to rush pitch into a warm wort anyway. I wouldn't suggest going much longer than 12 hours but I have gone as long as 24 without any problems.

It all depends how clean your process is. Agree 12 hours will not hurt anything.

3
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Food Grade CO2
« on: May 14, 2015, 07:18:27 PM »

I'm telling you only what I heard from the co2 guys. There's also the guys who said "they pull it a from the same tank" so there's that. Regardless, I wouldn't worry too much about it for homebrewed beers.

And my supplier name is .... Welding and gas. Bring CO2 on big truck and fill my 600lb tank.

Now when we are talking about O2 and CO2. There is O2 in CO2 I think.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Five Star acid wash #5
« on: May 14, 2015, 07:08:54 PM »
It will work just fine. No need to evacuate CO2 with acid.

I use more acid cleaner 6 but I use 5 from time to time. Read MSDS and tips sheet.

It is not too aggressive to my opinion. Wear glows when working with any concentrated chemicals. Also glasses are recommended.

5
Beer Recipes / Re: Session Czech lager
« on: May 14, 2015, 07:03:04 PM »
They would call it 10 (Plato). Never session.

6
Ingredients / Re: Great Base malt debate?
« on: May 07, 2015, 08:37:10 PM »

Use German malts for German beers, English Malts for English Beers, Scottish malts for Scottish beers and American Malts for American beers. You can use Belgian Malts for Belgian beers, German and French malts work well too. Not too hard to figure out when you look at it that way.
So, it almost seems like you're saying that when you try to recreate beers from certain areas that you tend to use ingredients from those areas. Or am I reading into it too much?

Yes I do it the same way.

7
Equipment and Software / Re: StPats Service
« on: May 07, 2015, 05:22:07 PM »

Hi All,

I've been lurking here after a few posts and Q's back in Jan.  We've come a very long way in 4 short months and we're having some very good success.

I want to write and let you all know about the absolutely miserable experience I had trying to make a simple online purchase from StPats in San Antonio, Texas.

It went like this:

1. I'm seeking a stainless coil to use in a BBT for our large home brewery.  STOUT tanks suggests a Letina plate kit sold by StPats, and even gives me a link to the item on their site - very helpful.

2. I hum and hah about the BBT and the plate, and after about 10 days I decide that no matter what tank I choose, the plate will work.

3. I head to the StPats website on May 4.  I'm more than a little shocked by it's amateur/Y2K feel.  I'm a little shocked by the fact that the website forbids you from using the "go back" function of your browser once you have placed something in your cart - seems odd, but OK.

4. I persevere.  I see that StPats has no interest in taking the money of those who hold either Mexican or Canadian credit cards, which I find odd, since Visa is more than happy to convert my CDN in to USD.

5. I continue to perservere - forgetting my own rule that the internet is a very, very big place and that there is likely a more willing company that'd gladly take my dirty Canadian dollars.  I see that the website states that they will not ship an order of less than 1000$ to Canada.  "No problem!!" I say, as I have a drop shipping place in MT - problem solved - so I thought.

6. As StPats is not interested in my dirty Canadian (platinum) Visa, I must enter a BS number and wait for them to contact me with wiring or mailing instructions.  I'm good and pissed off by now, as again, this is 2015.  I have still not remembered my own rule re: the size of the internet.

7. I wait.  I wait for 48 hours - no call, no email.  On the morning of May 6th I try calling.  "Ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring.......ring" - no answer.  I then realize that the very modern StPats website doesn't actually offer a phone number, and that by using YELP.com I have likely broken some StPats rule, so I email.  I email within the narrow window on hours that the StPats website will allow, and I get a response....

8. The email states this, and this alone:

As stated online our terms are $1000 minimum order for Canadian customers regardless of shipping point.
Your order does not meet the minimum $1000.00  so it was cancelled.


St. Patrick's of Texas
10601 Wetmore Rd
San Antonio, TX 78216
stpats@stpats.com
www.StPats.com

9.  Nice.  No call, no email, no flexibility.  Apparently canadians have a $1000 minimum cover charge for the privilege or shopping with Don.  I don't know who is keeping the lights on for this Jerk.  My guess is that he's a real sweetheast when Mondavi or Coor's calls, and the rest of us are a bother to him.  It was at this point that I used Google to learn more about other's experiences with StPat's, and it seems I am in good company.  See for yourself, it's ugly.  I'll be letting all of his suppliers know exactly how their products are being represented in the Southern USA.


I simply wanted you all to know what to expect should you wish to procure some goods from Don at StPats.  I eventually recalled my rule, and have found several other Letina dealers in the US, and a couple in Canada.  I'm gonna see if they're interested in my 500$ - even though they're just Canadian dollars.

-J.

ps - I found this gem on the website too:

Ordering Parts

    We supply parts for equipment sold by us. We do not supply parts for equipment purchased elsewhere. In short, we will no longer be the service department for most of the winery equipment suppliers.
    Use the links below to find parts and order online. If the part is not listed, then send an email. Use schematics online to clearly specify the part.
    Do not call us about parts. Use email as it is far more efficient and accurate.


Apparently is is the upfront sale, and the upfront sale only, that is important to StPats.  "Find your own damn parts", "Make sure if you bother me, you have a part number", "don't call"........

Sorry about your experience but Internet is littered with similar reviews.

8
Beer Recipes / Re: Czech Dark Lager
« on: May 07, 2015, 05:18:37 PM »

Anyone got a good recipe? I can't find much info but I think the style falls somewhere between a Dunkel and Schwartz? This is what I've come up with so far.
50% pilsner
40% dark Munich
6% caramunich III
4% carafa II
25-30 IBU saaz
WY 2000

Search for bohemian dunkel and you will find great article.

You need a o have more caramunich and about 24 IBU. You can use hellertau if you want smother beer.

Otherwise your recipe is in the ball park.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer in Brazil
« on: May 07, 2015, 05:14:02 PM »
Nice article. Glad you guys had a great experience.

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Foamy beer
« on: April 27, 2015, 03:40:09 PM »

From Micro-Matic Advanced Draft Training:
  • Temperature is the 1st determining factor for everything else in a draught system.
  • For every degree above 380F, the internal keg pressure increases 1/2 lb as the CO2 expands.
  • 380F is the most stable temperature for CO2
  • At 380F, most kegged beer requires 12-14 lbs. of internal keg pressure in order to keep the CO2 balanced within the beer.
  • With very short lines it's gonna be difficult to get enough restriction applied to the keg while also keeping your flow rate low enough that beer doesn't come flying out of your faucet... resulting in a ton of foam  :'(
  • The ideal flow rate should be 2 oz's/ sec. The best way to test this is to hook up a cleaner pot full of water to your system and pour into measuring pitcher. i.e. start stopwatch as soon as you open the valve and stop at 15. You should have 30 oz.'s of water in your pitcher.
  • To adjust the flow rate while keeping the keg pressure ideal, you can utilize different diameter tubing. Tubing diameter is measured by the "I.D." (interior diameter). I'm assuming you'll be using Vinyl so I'll list the restriction measurements for each size.
  • 3/16" - 3 lbs/ft
  • 1/4" - 0.85 lbs/ft
  • 5/16" - 0.40 lbs/ft
  • 3/8" - 0.20 lbs/ft
  • 1/2" - 0.025 lbs/ft
   
To sum everything up in an easy way, if you use 3/8" hose with a length of 6', you won't have a problem giving your beer the CO2 it requires while still providing enough restriction to keep your flow rate to 2 oz's/ sec. So even though you don't need 6' in hose length right now, this allows for some flexibility to handle temperature changes as well as making adjustments according to your beer style.

When you extend your system to the upstairs, be sure to keep in mind that you'll have to greatly increase your pressure to account for the added lift required.
The 380F?

11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Length and diameter of beer/gas lines
« on: April 27, 2015, 03:38:55 PM »

From Micro-Matic Advanced Draft Training:
  • Temperature is the 1st determining factor for everything else in a draught system.
  • For every degree above 380F, the internal keg pressure increases 1/2 lb as the CO2 expands.
  • 380F is the most stable temperature for CO2
  • At 380F, most kegged beer requires 12-14 lbs. of internal keg pressure in order to keep the CO2 balanced within the beer.
  • With very short lines it's gonna be difficult to get enough restriction applied to the keg while also keeping your flow rate low enough that beer doesn't come flying out of your faucet... resulting in a ton of foam  :'(
  • The ideal flow rate should be 2 oz's/ sec. The best way to test this is to hook up a cleaner pot full of water to your system and pour into measuring pitcher. i.e. start stopwatch as soon as you open the valve and stop at 15. You should have 30 oz.'s of water in your pitcher.
  • To adjust the flow rate while keeping the keg pressure ideal, you can utilize different diameter tubing. Tubing diameter is measured by the "I.D." (interior diameter). I'm assuming you'll be using Vinyl so I'll list the restriction measurements for each size.
  • 3/16" - 3 lbs/ft
  • 1/4" - 0.85 lbs/ft
  • 5/16" - 0.40 lbs/ft
  • 3/8" - 0.20 lbs/ft
  • 1/2" - 0.025 lbs/ft
    To sum everything up in an easy way, if you use 3/8" hose with a length of 6', you won't have a problem giving your beer the CO2 it requires while still providing enough restriction to keep your flow rate to 2 oz's/ sec. Since 3/8" hose is so standard you'll never have to retro-fit anything to your system.


Oh yeah! Most people use strait CO2 in their systems - which is perfect... as long as you're running through more than a keg per week - however, CO2 will start to dissolve into the beer after about 3 days, resulting in added carbonation and eventually your beer becoming pure foam. If you keep your beer longer than this, you'll want to use a "mixed-gas" blend, which is normally CO2 mixed with N2 which will allow you to maintain the proper applied pressure while reducing the likeliness that you'll over-carbonate your beer.   
Did you mean to say 38F?

Just checking because 380F looks just a little bit high.

13
Events / Re: NHC- Anyone bringing the fam?
« on: April 25, 2015, 07:39:03 AM »
:)

14
Events / NHC- Anyone bringing the fam?
« on: April 25, 2015, 07:35:29 AM »
No one will give you the stink eye for having a 4 year old. Remember most dedicated homebrewers fall into the "slightly nerdy married white guy between the ages of 25-45" which translates to prime kid years. The usual caveats apply, of course, in terms of where the kids are allowed to be (e.g. the actual conference itself which is 21+)

I see I am outside of home brewer demographic. Time to quit home brewing.

15
Going Pro / Re: Well, this happened.....
« on: April 24, 2015, 03:14:53 PM »
I do not think we have any limitation like this in WI. I think this is because it is too cold to squabble an we just need a beer :)

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