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Messages - Thirsty_Monk

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 158
1
All Grain Brewing / stuck mash on Blichmann Top Tier system
« on: July 21, 2019, 08:51:53 PM »
I realize this is an old post, but maybe my fix will help someone else. I had the same problem, using a Blichmann 30 gallon based RIMS setup. I use mostly DIY components, except the kettles and the false bottom, which is the weakest link in my whole setup. MacGyvering a new false bottom now. Won't use the Blichmann anymore. Always clogs when flakes are involved and sometimes when there aren't.

Unfortunately the quick-connect couplers I use do not allow blowing back air through the hose. But I found disconnecting and reversing the flow from the pump works great, just a lot of hassle. With two extra 3-way valves and a bit of pipe screwed next to the pump on a board, all I now need to do is pull two handles, reversing the flow until it is unstuck, usually within 5 to 10 seconds, and then pull handles again to restart flow in correct direction.

Below is the schematic if anyone is interested:



Blue links are pipes, gray are hoses, dark circles are quick-connect points. Blue circle is pump, pie charts are valves showing open flow sides. Brown background is the board onto which all is screwed down.
There was a paper that suggested that to have course graind and loose permeable bed will result in better lautering and higher extract.

I know it sort of contradict to itself but if you mill at home you can adjust your mill to your lauter. It is a find dance.
http://www.craftbrewersconference.com/wp-content/uploads/ImprovingBrewhouseEfficiency-Havig.pdf

Or http://masterbrewerspodcast.com/079-brewhouse-efficiency-for-the-small-brewer

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Oxidation question
« on: July 21, 2019, 06:03:51 PM »
Last thing you can have stailing of your beer even with out oxygen due to too much FAN and fatty acids.

Yes. Although the LODO people use the term oxidation to refer to all staling, there other mechanisms.
The issue is not that simple.

It is barley variety dependent. If barley variety would have less FAN then it would have more Bata Glucain and via versa. Yeast needs some FAN but if too much is left over, that will make stailing.

You can find FAN levels from Malt Analyses.
The particular staling mechanism involved is called Strecker (sp?) degradation, in case that might direct you to further sources.

While FAN should be available on the COA, it may be of little help if one does not have an idea of how much FAN yeast can consume in one's process.

Prudent practice is to use malt with low total nitrogen (trusting that the maltster has appropriately balanced FAN, beta glucan, and other parameters) and minimize all other risk factors for staling reactions:  mash in above 60°C, and minimize thermal loading, oxygen, etc. through the whole process, and pitch an appropriate (not excessive) amount of yeast with good vitality and viability to maximize growth.
Robert, you are correct in all the points what you mentioned. Here is a presentation from last year Malt U about this topic. https://bsgcraft.com/resources/Announcements/FAN%20and%20Flavor%20impacts_Malt%20Symposium%202018.pdf?_ga=2.114860551.1029554665.1563732014-1038012913.1563732014

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Oxidation question
« on: July 21, 2019, 05:59:26 PM »
As Martin suggested dry hopping can be one of the biggest factors in O2 ingress. One thing you can try is adding your hops to a keg, purging the keg with co2 then racking the beer onto the hops (via closed transfer if possible). You can also add the hops near the end of active fermentation so that the yeast scavenge the o2.
I always have experience yeast activity after dry hopping. This will take care of any free oxygen. There was a study at MBAA that talk about “dry hop creep” that some hops could have enzyme to break dextrens  and allow for refermentation.

Last thing you can have stailing of your beer even with out oxygen due to too much FAN and fatty acids.

I am like a walking knowledge. I just returned from Malt U :)

Hop Creep is certainly real but I havent found it to be enough to avoid oxidation pitfalls.

I actually tried to make hop creep happen to study the effects.  2 tries so far no hop creep.  3rd try coming up.
Denny, you king of podcast. There was an presentation at MBAA about hop creep. You can listen to it here. http://masterbrewerspodcast.com/098-dry-hop-creep You do not have to be a MBAA member to access the podcast.

Keith, I have experienced refermentation after dry hoping after reaching terminal gravity. My only explanation is that it is availability of oxygen and enzyme activity from dry hops. Granted I was using 3.5lb/BBL.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Oxidation question
« on: July 21, 2019, 01:42:17 AM »
Last thing you can have stailing of your beer even with out oxygen due to too much FAN and fatty acids.

Yes. Although the LODO people use the term oxidation to refer to all staling, there other mechanisms.
The issue is not that simple.

It is barley variety dependent. If barley variety would have less FAN then it would have more Bata Glucain and via versa. Yeast needs some FAN but if too much is left over, that will make stailing.

You can find FAN levels from Malt Analyses.

5
Equipment and Software / Re: I LOVE electric brewing.
« on: July 20, 2019, 08:16:14 PM »
Electric brewhouse is a great choice for homebrewing.

Scaling it up to commercial setting is not such a good choice. The monthly electric bills will do you in.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Oxidation question
« on: July 20, 2019, 08:09:49 PM »
As Martin suggested dry hopping can be one of the biggest factors in O2 ingress. One thing you can try is adding your hops to a keg, purging the keg with co2 then racking the beer onto the hops (via closed transfer if possible). You can also add the hops near the end of active fermentation so that the yeast scavenge the o2.
I always have experience yeast activity after dry hopping. This will take care of any free oxygen. There was a study at MBAA that talk about “dry hop creep” that some hops could have enzyme to break dextrens  and allow for refermentation.

Last thing you can have stailing of your beer even with out oxygen due to too much FAN and fatty acids.

I am like a walking knowledge. I just returned from Malt U :)

7
Pimp My System / Re: Once upon a time, a homebrewer was bored
« on: July 18, 2019, 01:55:23 AM »
It looks great. Congratulations. Keep on brewing.

I do not mean to rain on your parade but most of commercial tap handles are not for a sale. If you bought them then person who sold you them stole them.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Northern Brewer Sold
« on: July 13, 2019, 03:16:46 AM »
It will be sold again in3-7 years. This is how VC works.

9
Hot break is mostly protein.  But the density of wort is a measure of all dissolved material -- of course mostly sugar, but also small contributions from soluble proteins, and even hop acids and oils, and the mineral content of the water.  I presume that the removal from solution of a portion of the proteins would be measurable,  at least with a hydrometer.   I don't know how or if a refractometer calibrated with a sucrose solution would read this.  (Maybe  I should know, because I too use a digital Plato refractometer.)  On the homebrew scale, I have always assumed there is a real effect which accounts to some degree for my observed difference in increase in density as actually measured and as predicted by the evaporation rate.  But I also assume that this is all within the margin of my measurement accuracy and resolution (if my eyeball reading of my dipstick is off by a few fluid ounces, and my refractometer has an accuracy of +/- 0.2 °P, any real effect will probably be obscured by error.)  But perhaps on a larger scale, you are able to more reliably observe such small variations?  This has always been in the back of my mind, and I am curious to know if there is any good scientific study of this.  It might even in some way provide an index  index of effective boiling, insofar as the precipitation of undesirable proteins is a primary goal of the boil.
Very interesting. You are correct we are measuring liquid density and assuming that it is all sugar.

Thank you for the explanation.


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10
Now do not ask me how that happened but my pre boil gravity is always bigger then my post boil gravity.

Granted it is on 15 BBL brewhouse. I whirlpool the whole time I sparge to avoid stratification.

It is mystery to me.
15BBL fantastic stuff!!
You have came a long way from when I visited your brewery years ago. You were trying to get the canner operational. Bravo Sir!!
One day I hope to make it back and see your “new” location. 


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Yes. It had been nine years already. Time flies when you have fun.

Let me know when you are around and I will show you how it is going.

11
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: aeration ideas
« on: July 02, 2019, 09:59:09 PM »


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I used one of those venture aerator for a few years.  There was nothing difference when I stopped using it.  I think it's one of those things that people think should make a difference but have never really tested.
I’ve never used one myself actually. I remember Leos used a Venturi for in-line aeration when he started his brewery. The idea has always stuck with me since then.


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Thank you for mentioning me.

I still do use Venturi tube. Issue is that you need to have adequate flow to create the vacuum (to suck the air into the liquid stream).

I am not sure if there are so small Venturi tubes that would be adequate for home brewing.

Nowadays I use 1” tube( that would be a NPT Thread size). I can ferment 9 % beer without a problem. My transfer takes about 60 minutes and last time I bought new yeast pitch was 2.5 years ago. This puts me to 63-th repitching (some people call it generation).

As Denny mentioned if you use dry yeast, you do not have to worry about wort airration.

12
Ingredients / Flaked Oat and bottle conditioning
« on: July 02, 2019, 09:35:06 PM »
My understanding is that you need to have enzyme to convert the oats.

Flake oats are already gelatinized and ready for extract. Your temperature was about right. Your conversion time was fine. All you are missing is some barley for the enzyme.

As Denny said, you have unconverted starch in your beer and you might have a hard time to clarify it.

Your yeast will be just fine after cold crashing.

13
It looks like I successfully hijacked this thread :)

I do not have a lot of evaporation in my BK. It is quite common to be below 3% in commercial brewhouses. Just the volume to surface area. On top of that my evaporation stack is sideway and I do not get a good draft.

One would assumed that if there is no reduction in volume the gravity would stay the same.

I take preboil gravity  from side port. I take a sample about 16 Oz, dump it and take another sample to measure.

I use fine scale Plato refractometer so that would eliminate the error on sample part as well as instrument part.

Why would hot break make make a difference? Hot break usually coagulate protein.

Looking into the records I am off about 0.3-0.5 Plato. My next step would be to take pre boil sample from top of BK.

Thank you for reading.

14
Now do not ask me how that happened but my pre boil gravity is always bigger then my post boil gravity.

Granted it is on 15 BBL brewhouse. I whirlpool the whole time I sparge to avoid stratification.

It is mystery to me.

15
Equipment and Software / Solid bottom brew pots??
« on: June 14, 2019, 11:06:09 PM »
Looking for a source for SS brewing vessels around 20 - 25 gal that do not have tri-clad bottoms. I am working on building a new system that utilizes electric heating elements and I want to weld tri-clamp fittings to the bottom of the pots, so I am pretty sure that the bottoms will need to be solid.
I would advise against having heating elements straight up (if I read your post correctly)

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