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Messages - brewmanator

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16
Events / Re: NHC 2013 Entry Problems - Possible Solutions?
« on: February 27, 2013, 11:05:23 AM »
The pre-qualification argument to reduce entries is not a good one.  That's what the first round of this competition is for.  If you want to enter a competition where you have to pre-qualify then google MCAB and proceed from there.


17
Events / Re: NHC 2013 Entry Problems - Possible Solutions?
« on: February 27, 2013, 09:57:34 AM »
There were obviously issues abound with the registration, hence the need to suspend it after just a few hours. I am certain those in the know of everything that occurred will come to reasonable solutions in the future.

I for one also took time out off of work to ensure I was able to get my beers entered.  Not sure if any else had my experience, but the email with the links never made it into my inbox until after 5pm.  By that time, I had already found the posting from Janis with the links, but late enough that the two closest sites to me were already over booked, but in enough time to get into a third.  Unfortunately, I got as far as entering me into the system and they suspended registration before I got any beers entered.  So now I am kinda in, but no guarantees - if the system comes back up while I am at work because I can't take the whole week off, guess I am out even though I planned time off to get in.

I am sure the 15 limit came after much debate and by looking at the number of entrants/entry over the past years is way above what the average brewer is submitting.

Over the past several years, I have tried some different strategies on my way to "fame and glory" of winning in the NHC.  Best I've done is to win in the first round, but never the second.  My excitement this year being that the finals are in my back yard had me double the amount of entries I wanted in compared to the past.  To help my chances, what I have done was to enter as many of the beers into recent, local contests and planned on submitting those entries that had either won in those contests, or scored 38 or better in categories that were flooded with entries but didn't win.  My theory is, I am upping my game in the NHC and giving myself the best opportunity to get as many of my entries to the second round as possible.  So, one suggestion to help improve the quality at the grand poobah of contests may be to require entries to the first round have placed top 3 in category at an AHA/BJCP sanctioned contest in the year prior to the NHC it is to be entered.  This may alter the number of entries or brewers, or not, but would up the ante.

If the issue is system overload, pre-registration could simply be get your personal info loaded and number of entries you have to submit and then get a voucher from the system to get people into and out of the it quickly and efficiently.  Then, following the pre-registration period, which could be pared down from a week to a couple days, or not, provide a couple day window for folks to enter the particulars of their entries and pay.  Once the voucher expires, it is forfeited and can go back to general enrollment based on first come/first served if there are spots available at the site you are registered for.  You can limit the vouchers per entrant at any number, you would allow time for people to get all their intended entries in based on first in/first out for the pre-registration (i.e. remove the complaint that I can't type fast enough or the system didn't process fast enough for me to get all my entries in), and like now, if you don't pay, you are out and others can get back in and possibly enter all the beers they want.

If all of this was already considered or tried in the past, I apologize for redundancy, there are a lot of folks with much higher brain function than me that will figure this out!

My $0.02:

In my opinion this competition should be open to as many AHA members as possible.  Each member should have the same opportunity to enter as any other member.  If there are more that 8250 (11 regions times 750 entries) members that would like to enter the competition then we need to randomly pick (lottery) who gets to enter.  I would be surprised if we are at that limit, but if this is truly an open competition then it has to be this way. 

I was scooped on this but here is what I was crafting about pre-registration...

A simple pre-registration would help immensely.  First it locks in the number of members who are allowed to participate. If the number is more than 8250 then you must randomly pick who is allowed to enter. Assuming the number of entrants will be less than 8250, then you need to ask each entrant how many entries they would like to enter (1-15).  Most likely the number of entries from this query will be higher than 8250.  Any entries over 8250 are then taken away from those entrants who requested the most number of entries.  You simply let each person know how many entries they are allowed at this point.  Finally you give each entrant at least a week to get their entries registered and paid for.  The few slots that are left over can be opened up to the public or added to the entrants that requested more entries to begin with.  This should make registration much less painful and stressful for all.

18
All Grain Brewing / Re: help classify this beer
« on: February 12, 2013, 08:48:26 PM »
+1 on what Denny says, sit down with a taster glass and the style guidelines and decide for yourself.

Reading your description and looking at the beer's "stats", it looks to me like a strong English Pale Ale.  It might be missing the typical caramel malt flavors and aromas, but I bet it might show well as a BJCP, 8C.

19
The Pub / Re: Why does Budweiser just not get it?
« on: February 05, 2013, 10:23:22 PM »
In 2007, my brother and I won the chance to scale up an IPA recipe, and help brew it on A-B’s pilot brewery in St. Louis.  At that time the pilot brewery was under the Michelob brand of A-B.  I learned that they were brewing three, 10 barrel test batches, five days a week working on recipes for beers like Czech Pilseners, Imperial IPAs, German-style Dunkelweizens, Irish Red Ales and American Pale Ales .  These beers were fantastic and would stand up quite well to the finest craft beer examples at that time.
Why were they doing that?  Working on recipes "just in case", developing less expensive versions for their craft partners, something else?
Let me work on Czech Pils recipe. 100% Pilsner malt ans Saaz hops. Shhhh... to not tell anybody. This is a secret recipe.

Yep, all you need is a recipe and anyone can make a great Czech Pils...

20
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Red's Apple Ale
« on: February 04, 2013, 10:40:27 AM »
Really?

I'm headed that way this year - I'll make sure to scratch it off the list.

Actually, the only two things on the list are Cantillon and Westvleteren. After that, I'll have to do some research on what's close and worth going to.

theoman can chime in here more than me, but the only part of Delirium Bar worth going to is the Hoppy Loft at the very top of the building.

If you want beer mecca, go to Chez Moeder Lambic Fontainas (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/21739). Every time I'm there it's really great.

When are you planning to be in Brussels?

Probably August - I told my wife we had to go to Europe before we had kids.

We each picked a country, and we're going to end up in Germany because her sister lives there.

Check out A La Becasse in Brussels.  Quaint little place with a good beer selection, especially if you like lambics.

21
The Pub / Re: Why does Budweiser just not get it?
« on: January 31, 2013, 09:17:24 AM »
In 2007, my brother and I won the chance to scale up an IPA recipe, and help brew it on A-B’s pilot brewery in St. Louis.  At that time the pilot brewery was under the Michelob brand of A-B.  I learned that they were brewing three, 10 barrel test batches, five days a week working on recipes for beers like Czech Pilseners, Imperial IPAs, German-style Dunkelweizens, Irish Red Ales and American Pale Ales .  These beers were fantastic and would stand up quite well to the finest craft beer examples at that time.
Why were they doing that?  Working on recipes "just in case", developing less expensive versions for their craft partners, something else?

Back then they sold these types of beers under their Michelob brand, we did not see much of these out in the PNW, but in the midwest and other places around the US you were able to buy Michelob Dunkel Weisse, Michelob Pale Ale, Michelob Irish Red Ale...

22
Events / Re: NHC competition site change.
« on: January 30, 2013, 10:33:53 AM »
Perhaps an AHA membership as a prerequisite to entering the competition could be adopted rather than the partial open concept. There must be some sort of solution to this problem that a little more brainstorming could solve.

An AHA membership is required to enter the competition. The only part that is partially open is that Members can buy a guest pass (usually used for SO) to the conference.

Not true. 

AHA membership is not required to enter this competition.  Non-members just have a more expensive entry fee.

23
Funny.  I did a hefeweizen with my second batch as well.  I can remember tasting it and thinking at the time it was one of the worst beers I'd ever had.  It tasted like banana bread with some clove mixed in.  For years I would tell people what failure that beer was, not knowing that it was probably pretty true to style.  I had never had a German Weizen beer at that point, so I thought I was making a Pyramid or Widmer hefeweizen clone.  ;D

Good luck with the second batch, I recommend not going too crazy with the extra ingredients so that you can nail down your process for future brews.

24
The Pub / Re: Why does Budweiser just not get it?
« on: January 17, 2013, 10:16:59 AM »
I had the amazing fortune to see firsthand what a company like Ab-InBev can accomplish if they put some resources toward brewing something other than American-style lagers.  In 2007, my brother and I won the chance to scale up an IPA recipe, and help brew it on A-B’s pilot brewery in St. Louis.  At that time the pilot brewery was under the Michelob brand of A-B.  I learned that they were brewing three, 10 barrel test batches, five days a week working on recipes for beers like Czech Pilseners, Imperial IPAs, German-style Dunkelweizens, Irish Red Ales and American Pale Ales .  These beers were fantastic and would stand up quite well to the finest craft beer examples at that time.  If you think they don’t understand the beer industry from top to bottom you are so mistaken.  They have their hands in every sector of the beer industry.  They reach us beer snobs by purchasing or investing in established companies like Goose Island and Redhook.  They try to retain customers who are ready to leap to craft beer, by making beers like the one the original poster complained about.  That beer was not made for you or me or anyone else who posts to a homebrewing forum on a regular basis.  It was made for the lifelong BMC drinker that wants to try something different, but not too different.   Just as Dirk mentioned if Ab-InBev wanted to make a double IPA, I have no doubt it would be an excellent beer.  They have every resource imaginable to make it happen.  They don’t need to do it, because they are already making those beers for us at Redhook, Goose Island and probably a couple of other breweries that I am not yet aware of.  In the end, I prefer to not support AB-Inbev, SAB Miller or Molson Coors because I like to drink local or make my own.

25
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Calculating Losses to hoses
« on: January 16, 2013, 08:55:47 AM »
I calculate (1/2" x 1/2" x PI)/4 x (30' x 12"/1') which gives a volume of 70.7 cubic inches which i about 1.22 quarts, or 1147 ccs.

That is more like what I calculated.  70.7 cubic inches is also around 2 imperial pints ;D

26
Hoping we can brew up a Robust Porter on Friday night. 

27
I have friends that say our American Barleywine is the best beer we've made.  My brother vacillates between recent batches of Strong Scotch Ale and Russian Imperial Stout.  My wife says it was a Dunkelweizen we made a year or so ago.  In terms of recognition, our American Brown Ale (Bucksnort) would be considered the best beer we have ever made.   I can't decide it’s like picking which of your kids is better.   

My hope is that the best beer we have ever made is in one the numerous carboys scattered throughout my home.  I will be shocked if it is the Standard American Lager we made a week or so ago, but I sure hope it is! ;D

28
Racking 10 gallons of dark Czech lager to kegs, so that we can use the slug of WYeast 2124 to make some sort of lager for Superbowl Sunday.  Leaning toward brewing a Marzen (Febzen?) or Vienna lager.  A blond bock might be nice as well.  Decisions, decisions...

29
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Where do I get EDTA?
« on: September 25, 2012, 08:40:12 AM »
I've never ordered anything from them for personal use, but vwr.com is where I would try first.

Looks like you need to have an approved account at VWR...

I looked on www.fishersci.com and you may be able to buy it there. 

30
Kegging a Vienna Lager and brewing a German Pils.

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