Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Joe Sr.

Pages: 1 ... 76 77 [78] 79 80 ... 260
1156
Kegging and Bottling / Re: bottling from keg
« on: January 21, 2015, 02:01:52 PM »
If you have two tanks, or a splitter on your line, you can purge the bottles in a similar fashion to how you are filling them.

I use a pneumatic air gun (is that redundant?) with a hose on the end to get the CO2 to the bottom of the bottle.  Purge, fill, cap. 

It's helpful to have an assistant, if you can work that out.

EDIT:  I would also recommend turning up the CO2 pressure on the keg for a day or so.  Overcarbed when you are bottling is OK since you will lose some CO2 in the process.

1157
I repitch repeatedly though typically I make a fresh starter each time from a stored slurry.

I've noticed performance changes over time with subsequent reputches but the biggest for me would be failure to drop clear. I've not really notified flavor changes attributable to the yeast.

I'm not sure what was lacking, but there is the theory that over pitching will produce more esters. IF that's what you were looking for perhaps batch 1 was the over pitch. It's much more likely with a full yeast came than with a starter.


1158
Estimating yeast cell counts in this fashion is inexact, but probably close enough to get the job done.

Yes, you will likely be overpitching if you use the entire yeast cake.  Yes, you can just go ahead and put your fresh wort on top of the yeast cake.  You can make perfectly good beer this way and be happy with it.  You may also get off-flavors or unexpected flavors from the overpitch.  Some people say more esters.

An easy way to deal with this would be to pour the yeast cake out into one or more sanitzed jars/containers and use the amount you think is appropriate.  1/3 is probably what you need. 1/2 if you want to be conservative.

This also would give you the benefit of using a clean fermenter that doesn't have all the mess of the previous fermentation.

I've used whole yeast cakes in the fashion you plan to do with good results.  The process of pouring out and using only a portion is so simple and effective that I haven't done the whole yeast cake thing in years.

1159
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: C15L base malt?
« on: January 16, 2015, 01:22:44 PM »
I would assume domestic 2-row as a base malt and 5% -10% crystal and honey.  Maybe 10% if it's sweeter.  Split the crystal and honey malt 50/50 or 75/25.  I've never used honey malt, so I'm not sure what it adds.

If you're using malt extract, I'd use whichever light extract you prefer as your base malt.  Steep the crystal and honey malt.

Clean ale strain on a domestic beer likely means Chico.  US-05 or one of the liquid strains should do it.

1160
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Here we go again with the foam question
« on: January 16, 2015, 10:42:57 AM »
I tried this beer in 2 kegerators with cooling towers and a walk in fridge. Still more foam than beer. The real problem is not serving a beer with a larger head, it's that the beer de-carbonates when there is a big head.

The carbonation releases to give you a flat beer with a huge head of foam.


What causes that?

This happens when you are pouring too fast/too much pressure.  You blow foam out of the tap and when it settles you have flat beer with a huge head.

Well I changed out the "line out" post and poppet and cleaned the dip tube with no change in foam.

Do you think the dip tube is to close to the bottom forcing the beer to squeeze through causing unnecessary turbulence  ?

On some of my kegs, the dip tube is bent to pick up beer from the middle of the keg.  When tightening the post, the dip tube will often rotate. If it winds up pinned against the side of the keg, the opening gets restricted and the pour becomes all foam.

1161
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Right RPM for stir plate?
« on: January 14, 2015, 07:04:27 PM »
Oh, and why the extra light DME?

Extra light DME usually contains a higher percentage of sugars that can be reduced to glucose by yeast cells than the darker DMEs.
OK, thanks, I'll try that.
Any thoughts on the welding O2?  Increasing the percentage of O2 in the vessel headspace should help to get oxygen into the starter when shaken.  O2 is 20% of air so 1L of starter in a 1 gal. vessel gives 0.6 (approx.) volumes of O2 per volume of starter.  Increasing the O2 percentage in the headspace to 60% gives the same ratio of O2 volumes to starter volumes in 2L in a 1 gal. vessel.

Don't overthink it.  My takeaway from this thread is that simple processes are just fine.

I will choose to stick with my stir plates.  Shake if you choose.  Pumping O2 into the headspace seems unnecessary.

1162
All Grain Brewing / Re: Creating recipes
« on: January 14, 2015, 09:08:57 AM »
I use Designing Great Beers frequently.  I also think that it's useful to look at a number of recipes for the style you want to brew and see the similarities and differences.  Be careful which on-line recipes you grab, some are crap and some are golden.  Over the years I've relied on published recipes in BYO, Zymurgy, a couple Papazian books, and other books like Brew Like a Monk.

If you're trying to learn a style, start with a successful recipe and then try tweaking it.  If you're trying to learn yeasts, split a batch and ferment with two different yeasts.  Hops?  Split a batch between two single hops.  Malt?  Brew the same recipe but change the malts.

You will learn by doing.  Repeat, repeat, repeat.

1163
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Right RPM for stir plate?
« on: January 13, 2015, 03:54:41 PM »
I can agree that temp control tends to be over emphasized.  You do not need a fermentation fridge to make good beer.  You can make perfectly good beer at ambient temps, assuming your ambient temps are within the right range (I'd say not higher than 68) and that they remain stable.  I don't think it's best practice to ferment your ales in the 70s, though I've had that happen on occasion, but you can certainly make drinkable beer, even good beer if you've got a strain that can handle those temps.

I've seen newer brewers on this forum get worried about having to dump a beer because fermentation temps got into the 70s, without yet having tasted the beer.  That's no the relax, don't worry approach.

As a group, we tend to get obsessive about things and I think that keeping things simple is the best way for new brewers to get going.  Not everyone needs all the tricked out gadgets.  Not everyone needs a dedicated fermentation fridge.

However, I do think it's important for brewers to understand fermentation temperatures and the impact/effect of different temperatures.  Figure out what works for you and what you like.  I think we're all interested in obtaining consistent results and fermentation temperature control is important for consistent results (even if your temp control is simply a consistent ambient temp).

There is art to brewing, even if the foundation is science.  I'm no scientist, but I am a brewer.

1164
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Stir bar in Fermentor
« on: January 10, 2015, 08:49:53 AM »
Magnet is the way to go. I figured that out after I dumped a starter and flushed a stir bar. I did not attempt to retrieve that one.

No worries in letting the bar sit through fermentation. It will not harm anything just don't forget it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1165
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Do you strain your wort?
« on: January 10, 2015, 08:47:47 AM »
I haven't strained my wort in years. No worries. Beer drips bright and tastes great.

No harm in straining if you want to but I think it's unnecessary and always found it to be a pita.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1166
The Pub / Re: Jim Koch has a problem....
« on: January 10, 2015, 08:36:02 AM »

I'm sure they have three handles at every Applebee's. Lager, Rebel, Seasonal.

Edit - Sam light in bottles.

Now imagine the article in Applebee's settings.
"He walks in the cooler and looks over the beer selection. He smiles hugs his kegs and returns to have another SA from multipack".

And drove home in his Mercedes.

Was driven home by his driver.

1167
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewing for the New Year
« on: January 09, 2015, 10:34:57 AM »
Office is closed on the 19th.  I plan to brew 10 gallons at least that weekend.  What?  Haven't decided yet.

Probably the annual old ale.  Maybe a tripel.  Maybe a stout.

I've got to try out the new grain mill.

1168
The Pub / Re: Beer brewers vs beer "architects" in Belgium
« on: January 09, 2015, 07:52:01 AM »
Here it is if you just contract brew then you are a beer company. If you brew then you are breeding company. Boston Beer Company started as a contract brewer....

OK.  I think I get you.  You and Major are making the distinction between the brewer/brewery and the company who contracts them to brew their beer.  I missed that in the earlier post. 

I thought Major was saying if you were a contract brewer (ie. brewing someone else's beer for them) you were not a "real" brewery. 

I agree that if you contract someone else to brew your beer you are not a brewery/brewer.  But the brewery contracted to brew the beer for you is.

1169
The Pub / Re: Jim Koch has a problem....
« on: January 09, 2015, 07:47:16 AM »
Joe, I admire that nice looking brick building with the Schlitz sign every time I go to the Map Room.

Yep, that's one of them.  I think Fitzgerald's on Fullerton is also an old tied-house.

In the late 90's there was a push to landmark them so they couldn't be torn down, but I don't recall if that was approved or not.  If it made it to City Council, which I think it did, I'm sure it was approved.

No one builds storefronts like those anymore. 

Back on topic, sort of, I've attempted twice this week to convince myself to buy some Sam Adam's when I've been at the grocery store simply on account of spending too much time on this thread.  I just couldn't do it.  The seasonal mix-pack looks interesting, but I know there's beer in there I won't drink and it will just take up space in the fridge.  I also considered the Folly Pack, but it's the same thing.  The curse of mixed twelve packs. 

If the Sam Adams barrel series were easily available, I'd try those.

1170
The Pub / Re: Jim Koch has a problem....
« on: January 08, 2015, 03:53:34 PM »
Haven't we all acted dick-ish once in awhile?

Me? Never.

Pages: 1 ... 76 77 [78] 79 80 ... 260