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Messages - Joe Sr.

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1201
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Northern Brewer 3 Gallon Keg System
« on: December 15, 2014, 10:48:31 AM »
The place I get mine filled sells them, along with all kinds of kegging equipment, including new kegs.

1202
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fermentis/Safale dried yeast and saison
« on: December 15, 2014, 10:24:27 AM »
I used T-58 in a small saison a year or so ago.  Probably 1.05 or so to start.  Fermented around 68 tops for ambient temp.

I thought it came out well.  I don't recall specifics.  Served it at a party and it was well received.

1203
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Northern Brewer 3 Gallon Keg System
« on: December 15, 2014, 10:17:50 AM »
Do you need it now? AiH runs sales on new 2.5 gallon kegs a few times a year, and they tend to run about $70-80 apiece. I just waited for a sale and pieced my system together. I started out with 4 new kegs, a new aluminum CO2 tank, cobra tap, fittings, an extra set of O-rings, plus a portable CO2 charger and extra set of CO2 canisters for it. I got it for just over $470 (including shipping). Plus I got another $20 worth of reward points, which I put towards the next keg sale they ran.

Needless to say, if you aren't in a huge rush, the subscribe to AiH's newsletter and jump when they run their next sale. You can score a much better deal there.

I, too, started out with a new aluminum tank.  Not worth it in retrospect.  Just get a used one and swap them out at refill time.

1204
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: when to add sugars in a high gravity brew
« on: December 14, 2014, 02:53:46 PM »
Do like me. Simply forget to add the sugar during the boil. You'll be glad to be able to add it during fermentation.

Done that.  Several times.

1205
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: when to add sugars in a high gravity brew
« on: December 14, 2014, 11:54:43 AM »

I add everything in the boil.  I haven't noted a significant difference between this and when I have added sugar to the secondary.

Same here.  I have found no advantages to adding it later.

Well, I have found you can get beers 3 - 5 points lower by feeding sugar after fermentation has started. And it has been my condensed after several batches of tripel. I am flabbergasted that others haven't shared this experience.

1.080 tripel sugar added to boil 148 mash temp 1.5 hours and I have gotten 1.009 normally.

By adding sugar after most if primary is finished have adult gotten 1.004-1.006 every time I have tried it.

That's entirely possible, and I won't refute your experience.  I just haven't seen the need for the extra work to gain a couple of gravity points.

I checked my last two batches that had significant sugar additions.  One an old ale and the other a saison.

I know saison yeasts are their own world, so maybe not 100% applicable but the old ale was fermented with Notty/Windsor.  Saison went from 1.064 to 1.004 which i am happy with.  The old ale attenuated further than i wanted or expected and went from 1.094 to 1.008.  Both batches had cane sugar at 16% of the recipe by Beersmith 2 calculations.  I'm not looking for more attenuation, and in the case of the old ale I would have preferred less.

1206
Beer Recipes / Re: Seeking Old Ale recipes
« on: December 14, 2014, 10:31:46 AM »
In all the research I've done on old ales over the years, one thing that has been recommended which I have not tried is to use treacle for part of the fermentables.

I think molasses may be a close substitute, but Lyle's makes treacle if you can find it.

1207
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: when to add sugars in a high gravity brew
« on: December 12, 2014, 08:09:56 AM »
I add everything in the boil.  I haven't noted a significant difference between this and when I have added sugar to the secondary.

My understanding is that if you're going for a super high ABV beer, the incremental sugar feeding is important.

My beers are never super high ABV, though they are often quite strong.

1208
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Danstar Windsor
« on: December 12, 2014, 07:26:47 AM »
1.006 right?

I can't see Windsor doing that.  1.016, sure. 

1209
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: do you use dry yeast
« on: December 11, 2014, 02:31:31 PM »
OK, let me rephrase: there's no real conclusion to this thread.

Quite right. 

Often, quite frequently here you'll get a wide range of opinions, a whole lot of conflicting first hand experiences, and you'll just have to go and try it yourself.

Don't ask if you should rehydrate or not.

1210
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: do you use dry yeast
« on: December 11, 2014, 10:45:51 AM »
Back on topic. Apart from US-05, S-04 and Nottingham, I notice very little enthusiasm for dry yeasts. It's cheap and handy, especially when brewing small batches, yes, but not much more. This kind of confirms my ideas. Thanks for your feedback!

I don't think that's entirely accurate.  A lot of us use dry yeasts frequently, even if the preference is for liquid cultures.

I don't care for Notty, but some do.  I've made good beer with T-58, WB-06, Munich, and others.  I keep a bunch of dry yeast available and use it when I need to, usually an impromptu brew session.

1211
Kegging and Bottling / Re: New to kegging
« on: December 11, 2014, 10:34:36 AM »
The other aspect of an inexpensive regulator is quality.  I recently had to replace my regulator because it was leaking.  I bought a no-name one from the LHBS to save $20.  It is now in the trash and I went back to the one I know works well: http://www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-beer/regulators-pid-642-2.html

And it has been working well ever since.

I bought a 2nd regulator on eBay years ago.  It works just fine.  Was probably $35 at the time, a little cheaper than the regulators at the LHBS.  Maybe I got lucky.

1212
Beer Recipes / Re: Seeking Old Ale recipes
« on: December 09, 2014, 09:41:45 PM »
I've brewed a clone of Third Coast Old Ale.  I think BYO had printed the recipe.  I can dig it out if you like.

When I hit it, it's great.  When I miss, it's still good.

I just want to say that Bells calls it their Barleywine. BJCP has it as an American Barleywine. It is one of my favorites.

You say tomato, I say tomahto.

For me, it's not hoppy enough to be an American Barleywine.  But IMO the distinctions are fuzzy.

It's damn tasty what ever you want to call it.

1213
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Fining options
« on: December 09, 2014, 04:10:23 PM »
I usually use gelatin to clear up stubborn yeast that won't drop.  I don't believe that the beer needs to be chilled for this to work.  At least, in my experience it works fine at ~ 50F.

If you want to clear up chill haze, you need to chill the beer before you fine.

1214
Beer Recipes / Re: Seeking Old Ale recipes
« on: December 09, 2014, 10:51:44 AM »
I've brewed a clone of Third Coast Old Ale.  I think BYO had printed the recipe.  I can dig it out if you like.

When I hit it, it's great.  When I miss, it's still good.

1215
Wood/Casks / Re: age of Oak
« on: December 09, 2014, 09:33:01 AM »
If I wanted to be able to drink it straight and I used a white whiskey then I'd use a heck of a lot less oak and dilute with water so it is closer to the proof of a bourbon.

Agreed.  I have tried a pint or so of white whiskey with two, maybe three, chips to see if the oak and tannins will temper the flavors I don't like.  They haven't, but that amount of oak also hasn't been overwhelming.

There's a lot of white whiskey out there, some must be good and some people enjoy it so don't take my experience as universal.

My point is only to be sure you like the liquor you're using if you're going to add it to beer you plan to drink.

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