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Messages - Joe Sr.

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1216
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What Hops for Imperial Porter?
« on: October 23, 2013, 09:35:22 AM »
How does Perle sound for bittering and Fuggles at 30 and 0 for flavor and aroma?

My personal recommendation is to never use Fuggles, especially for aroma and flavor!

Meh.  I like Fuggles.  Particularly in an English ale.

But for a big porter my first thought was Centennial.

1217
General Homebrew Discussion / Concentrated boils and hop utilization
« on: October 23, 2013, 09:07:31 AM »
I was reading yesterday that supposedly John Palmer and others now state that hop utilization is independent of wort gravity.  These were third person attributions on another forum with no reference to source material, but others seemed to agree and take this as a known and generally recognized fact.

I had never heard this before.  Ever.  And I can't find anything in (admittedly brief) searches on-line that would support the attribution of this statement to Palmer other than third party attributions.  As a matter of fact, almost all links take me back to that same forum...

Anybody heard this before?  I suppose it could be total BS but I simply don't know.  It has always been my understanding that a concentrated wort had lower hop utilization.  Is the consensus changing?

I'm curious to know in general and especially since there have been a couple recent posts here about concentrated boils.

Maybe someone can chime in on the science behind all this.

1218
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Total Boil
« on: October 23, 2013, 07:44:07 AM »
That's a good question.  I don't know if you have enough extraction from the specialty grains to get good utilization from the hops.  There may be a sweet spot or threshold of wort gravity that you need to hit.  I don't know.  I do know that you want to boil hops in wort and not in plain water. Someone who knows more about the chemistry of hop utilization would need to weigh in on that.  You could certainly add the majority of your extract late.

I do partial mashes and add all my extract in the last 10 minutes or so.  I typically mash 5 lbs or more of grains though which is a fair bit more than you'd be using for specialty grains.

1219
For the record, I'm terrified of this beer. It's too good for that high of ABV.

Package it carefully.  Send it to me.  I will dispose of it.

1220
Equipment and Software / Re: Cleaning Old Used Kegging Equipment
« on: October 22, 2013, 03:02:14 PM »
Depending on where you live, you could look for a place that does paint ball refills.

Gas supplier is more convenient for me as I'd have to leave the city for paint ball equipment.

1221
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Correct volume for boil
« on: October 22, 2013, 02:47:27 PM »
the gravity of the solution also affects utilization. a higher gravity wort is less capable of isomerizing the hop acids so you get less IBUs (taste and analysis confirm this) the higher the gravity of the wort.

You know, I was reading earlier today that supposedly John Palmer and others now state that hop utilization is independent of wort gravity.  These were third person attributions on another forum with no reference to source material, but others seemed to agree and take this as a known and generally recognized fact.

I had never heard this before.  Ever.  And I can't find anything in (admittedly brief) searches on-line that would support the attribution of this statement to Palmer other than third party attributions.

Anybody heard this before?  Should I start a new thread on this?  I suppose it could be total BS but I simply don't know.  It has always been my understanding that a concentrated wort had lower hop utilization.

1222
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: double brew .. 1 fermentor
« on: October 22, 2013, 01:46:52 PM »
I would put the first batch in a sealed and sanitized bucket in the fridge and put them in the fermentor at the the same time.  That way I could get an accurate OG reading.

You can do it the way suggest.  Your first batch would be one heck of a yeast starter.  ;D

Paul

You can also just take the weighted average of the two OG readings and get to what should be the same number.  It should be pretty straight forward. Assuming both batches are the same volume you wouldn't even have to weight the average.

I wouldn't want to wait to pitch the yeast.  I'd do just what you (the OP) are proposing.

1223

Same here!! I thought I was the only one!


If you hit upon the magic formula, please let me know.  Good to know I'm not the only one, too.

As for saisons, I've been happy enough with 3711.  Never have used a White Labs vial.  Someday, perhaps.

1224
Personally, I struggle to make a nice simple Belgian blonde. 

I've generally been pleased with the lagers I've brewed but I don't try too often.  Especially not light lagers, as they're just not my thing.

But I simply can't get to a Belgian blonde that I really enjoy.  My last attempt was the best so far, but they're falling short of what I want.  These are not infected nor do they have off flavors but they're just not what they should be, if you follow what I'm saying.  They're lacking.  Perhaps I am like Sisyphus as I shall keep trying.

Easiest?  I think saisons are pretty easy.  As long as you don't use 3724.

1225
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Total Boil
« on: October 22, 2013, 07:30:46 AM »
IMO, if you can boil the full volume you should do it.  But great beer can and has been made with a concentrated boil.

Neither of the two issues pointed out above is specific to extract, really.  A concentrated boil will decrease hop utilization but that can be compensated for by using more hops.  If you don't have an immersion chiller you can always just put your kettle in an ice bath.  The quicker you cool the wort, the better, but there are people on this forum who have cooled over night and pitched the next day.  IIRC they put the covered fermenter into a lagering fridge or something like that.  Not ideal, but with great sanitation it can be done.

One thing to consider is that with extract and a concentrated boil you may get more darkening of the wort than you would with a full boil.  This is also easily compensated for by adding a significant portion of the extract late in the boil.  This approach works well for a concentrated boil, as you keep also keep the initial gravity of the wort lower and improve hop utilization.  If you do not go for the full boil, I would recommend that you add at least 50% or so of your extract late.

1226
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Lid on or off during boil?
« on: October 18, 2013, 10:15:24 AM »
The fact that beer darkens upon boiling is due to Maillard reactions. Caramelization occurs at higher temps and is similar to the Maillard reaction. Here's the three steps as laid out by a scientific study.

1. The first stage involves the sugar-amine condensation and the Amadori
rearrangement. The reaction steps have been well-defined and no browning occurs
at this stage.
2. The second stage involves sugar dehydration and fragmentation, and amino acid
degradation via the Strecker reaction especially at high temperatures as used in
candy manufacture. At the end of stage two there is a beginning of flavor formation -
depending on which flavor is studied.
3. Formation of heterocyclic nitrogen compounds. Browning occurs at this stage.

Cool  read! :)

http://eaton.math.rpi.edu/csums/papers/maillard/maillard.confectionary.pdf

That's a little too dense for me, but I thought the maillard reactions were occuring during kilning and only to a limited degree in the kettle.  I do not dispute the darkening of wort over a vigorous boil, however.

1227
Ingredients / Re: Gimme some sugar!
« on: October 18, 2013, 08:11:41 AM »

Also for molasses, blackstrap molasses is what we see in stores, but I hear there are other kinds.


I've used blackstrap but I try to only use Barbados molasses.  It's sweeter and has a lighter flavor.

I've read/been told that it's not technically molasses, though.  I believe it's made from sorghum.

1228
Ingredients / Re: Gimme some sugar!
« on: October 18, 2013, 07:04:43 AM »

Beet sugar


Forgot about that.  I should add that to my list.  Haven't used beet sugar in years that I know of.

And turbinado, though I'm not clear on the difference between raw cane sugar and turbinado.

1229
Ingredients / Re: Gimme some sugar!
« on: October 17, 2013, 02:42:57 PM »
I've used the following:

Cane sugar (refined and raw)
Rice syrup
Corn sugar
Honey
Maple syrup
Candi sugar (rocks)
Candy syrup
Succanat
Demerara
Brown sugar

Probably others, but these ones spring to mind.  Does molasses count as a sugar?

1230
Beer Recipes / Re: Copyright
« on: October 17, 2013, 09:50:37 AM »
The only way to totally duplicate it is
Same grain bill
Same hops
Same water
Same yeast
Same equipment
Same brewer

I think all of these play into the finished product.

Hmmm.  I brew the same recipes over and over.  There are differences between each batch. 

There may be differences in the maltster, although I'm pretty consistent on where/what I buy.  The hops may not be from the same harvest.  Pitching rate is pretty consistent, fermentation temp is pretty consistent.

It is difficult to produce homebrewed beer that does not have some batch to batch variability.  Duplicating someone else's beer I would have to say is nigh impossible.

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