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Messages - Joe Sr.

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16
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 6 Common Homebrew Myths
« on: August 09, 2016, 11:38:21 AM »
A good list, but I would quibble with the liquid vs. dry yeasts.  I would agree that they are equivalent for neutral yeasts (lagers, American ale), but for those styles where you want the yeast to produce esters and phenols, such as Belgians, British, and German weissbiers, I find all the dry yeasts lacking compared to the liquid varieties that are available.

The dry yeasts today are worlds away from what was available back when I started.  Liquid strains were definitely preferable to the packs of "ale yeast" or even the Munton's.  I think the "myth" is simply a persistent bias from the days when it was true.

These days, depending on what you are brewing, dry and liquid are equally good choices.

17
I'd start with small additions of oak and bourbon.  Same with vanilla.  It's easy to overdo flavor additions, and I would think even easier with one gallon batches.

Too much oak = very tannic beer.  It may be the only time I've actually had astringency.

18
That being said, I can't distinguish for certain which variables specifically are most leading to awesome lager (is it the oxygen? The fermentation schedule? The Spunding? The natural lagering?). I'm planning to brew up a s*** ton of Helles soon so maybe I'll throw one batch in there with zero-care given to O2 and see how it shakes out.

I don't think anyone's suggesting that there should be zero care given to O2, just questioning the role of confirmation bias in the testimonials.  But I don't want to argue it and we're derailing the thread...

19
I've tried to avoid the threads, but has anyone doing the LODO process done a side-by-side or triangle yet?  My recollection is not.

Not as far as I know.

That's what I thought.  I've been doing closed transfers to the keg on my last couple of batches (pushing out the star san, etc.).  I can't say that it's made a difference, but it can't hurt and it doesn't cost me anything.

These days, I'm mostly brewing for parties and the kegs go quick so any long-term oxidation doesn't get the chance to appear.

20
As far as the topic of the thread, I don't dry-hop much, but when I do it's typically in kegs that are sitting in my cool room at ~60 degrees.


21
There doesn't seem to be a consensus yet.  Denny has been cautious but has also said he thought he detected smoother beer.  A few others have thought there was an improvement but then backed off when doing side-by-side tests.  I absolutely notice softer, smoother beer (ale and lager) and if it's conformation bias, then CB must be a very powerful thing.  If this is all in my head, I need to have my head examined.  :P

I've tried to avoid the threads, but has anyone doing the LODO process done a side-by-side or triangle yet?  My recollection is not. 

22
Commenting is pointless without knowing the context.

You're no fun.

23
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Tap-a-Draft System.. Problems
« on: August 05, 2016, 12:49:48 PM »
I would turn them upright so they don't leak.  However, if you're losing liquid right now, you will lose pressure when they are upright.  Is there a gasket that's missing?  Something that would go inside the lid and seal against the lip of the bottle?

24
Beer Recipes / Re: Adding bourbon to homebrew
« on: August 05, 2016, 12:48:01 PM »
It depends on what you're looking for.  Bourbon by itself gives you something different than bourbon soaked wood chips.  Wood chips alone, with no bourbon, gives you something different as well.

I typically soak chips in bourbon and pour the liquid off the chips into the keg.

25
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Location of Grain Storage
« on: August 04, 2016, 09:25:52 AM »
I agree that storage near where you ferment shouldn't be a problem.

I try to mill outside just because the dust gets everywhere and one of my kids has asthma.  Don't need more dust in the house.

26
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Location of Grain Storage
« on: August 04, 2016, 09:08:34 AM »
The main concern is the dust. That's why many breweries keep their mills in separate rooms and auger it over to the mashtun. How big of a concern can it really be at our scale? We still need to pour the grain into the tun which throws up dust.

I believe that commercial breweries are required to separate their mills from the rest of the operation as the airborne grain dust has a low flashpoint and is a theoretical explosion risk.  One local brewery that I've toured here was required to install blast proof doors on their milling room.  I know Chicago has a particularly stringent fire code, but blast doors aren't typically required just cuz their cool.

27
I thought this was debunked years ago.  But maybe it was clinging to life in the dark recess of the net.

AFAIK, it's never been tested to this extent.

OK.  That's probably true.  I'll need to make time to read the details. Despite my better intentions I got drawn from the Brewtan threads back into the 56 page thread on HBT started by our German friends. What a time suck.

I just remember the olive oil theory being hot for a bit and then being debunked.  Maybe sort of like stir plates.  Maybe I've been around too long...

28
I thought this was debunked years ago.  But maybe it was clinging to life in the dark recess of the net.

29
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fermentation temperature control.
« on: August 02, 2016, 02:25:42 PM »
I've got a CAP fermenting in my mini-fridge right now with an STC-1000 controlling the temp.  It's my first fully automated temp control fermentation.  It's pretty sweet.  I've been ramping up the temp the last few days and it's as easy as pushing a few buttons.  We'll see if it makes better beer than the frozen bottles and water bath method, but at the least it requires less on-going monitoring.  I even left town for the weekend with no worries.

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