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Messages - Joe Sr.

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16
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: It begins...
« on: March 20, 2017, 09:10:44 AM »
Exclusive access to fermenters, yeast, etc. really doesn't bother me at all.

There are so many different varieties of everything available that I think it's moot.

As far as the LHBS, there is and always will be more variety available on-line.  If NB has what I think I need, I'll order from them.

It's a shame they (and others?) have moved away from providing the recipe with the kit, but I understand it.  I was always pleasantly surprised that I could DL the recipe and not buy the kit.

17
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Gelatin At Bottling
« on: March 17, 2017, 09:11:55 AM »
I don't think you want the gelatin to carry over into your bottles.  The first time I used it, ages ago, I had that happen.  I did pretty much everything wrong with the gelatin and had glops of it in my bottles.  It was nasty.

I'd do what stpug says and fine it first, let it clear, and then bottle.  You need far less yeast to carbonate your bottles than you might think.  Plus, if your beer needs fining, you want to get that out before it hits the bottle or you could have a pretty nice size chunk of sediment in the bottles.

18
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Best filling volume for keg
« on: March 17, 2017, 09:09:00 AM »
I'm pretty certain my regulators came with check valves.  It seems like less than best-practice not have them installed.

As far as filling, if I have less than 5 gallons I'll try to use a 2.5 or 3 gallon keg.  Anything excess can get bottled (which is a PITA, but doable).  If I've got 4 gallons, they'll go into a five gallon keg.  I don't need to bottle that much, but a sixer or so each batch is nice.  I try not to have beer pouring out the gas tube, but it's happened. Not the end of the world.

19
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Cleaning corny keg pickup tube
« on: March 17, 2017, 07:43:33 AM »
Wow.  The only time it's taken me 45 minutes to clean one keg was when I took some BKF to the outside to polish them up and get off old stickers.


20
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: It begins...
« on: March 17, 2017, 07:40:27 AM »

....if you are buying pre-made kits to clone a beer you like, do you really care what the grain bill is?



Probably not. But the secretive nature is disappointing regardless. No paranoia here, but the buyout of NB is starting to look like I feared it might and hoped it wouldn't. Oh well, doesn't mean I have to buy there.

I don't think it's a huge deal, but I have always liked that I could look up a kit, download and print the recipe, and brew it on my own with ingredients purchased at the LHBS.  With an undisclosed list of grains, I can't do that.  I'm not likely to actually buy the kit anyway, so no loss to me.  If I want the milk porter I'll head on over to the tap room.  Which also isn't going to happen because traffic there is a nightmare.

21
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: It begins...
« on: March 16, 2017, 03:24:36 PM »
From the instructions: http://docs.northernbrewer.com.s3.amazonaws.com/allgrain/AG-GooseIslandMilkPorter.pdf

"· 4.5 lbs Goose Island Milk Porter Brewery Edition Grain Blend"

This is what bothers me, when you start to see proprietary recipes and ingredients that you don't know what they are.  Might as well just start brewing Mr. Beer.

I'm with you there.  Initially, I was going to say what's the big deal.  NB and others have been working with breweries to put out kits for many years.  This is not really that different, but then you've got a secret mix of grains.

It's not like any two brewers will have those kits come out exactly the same anyway.

22
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Clear beer??
« on: March 16, 2017, 01:39:02 PM »
Not looking to weigh in either way here, but let's not let this degenerate please.

23
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Clear beer??
« on: March 16, 2017, 09:47:18 AM »
If you are brewing all grain you will have to pay attention to your pH if you want clear beers. pH will give you a better cold break which will help with a beer's clearning. Also cooling rapidly can drastically help in the clarity. Irish moss or Whirlflock will help in clearning. Certain yeast are simply stubborn to clear, Chico (US-05/WY1056/WLP001) is one in particular. Gelatin or other fining agents will help dramatically. Biofine Clear is an excellent fining agent. But as mentioned, cold and time will clear all beers eventually.

Absolutely, without the oxidation added from the fining agents to boot!

Does chill haze drop with time?  I assume so.  But I guess I don't know for sure since I'm asking.

24
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 15, 2017, 03:02:08 PM »

For "weazletoe", the internal "t-stat" you mention, is that the cool-side temp. sensor?

Not sure what you mean by "cool side sensor". I'm just making an assumption that you have an a/c with with a mechanical dial like stat. There should be two power wire on it. One hot, going in, and one out that is hot when the stat calls for cooling. cut these two off the stat and nut the together. The A/C should run 24/7 when you do that.

Most of the newer A/Cs that I've encountered have digital controls and no longer have the mechanical dial.  I believe it becomes much more complicated to override the sensor on these.  Maybe not.  I don't recall for sure, but it was enough of a bear that I skipped it.

25
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Tangy Aftertaste
« on: March 15, 2017, 11:22:01 AM »
I don't know much about iron in water, but certain yeast strains can also give a tangy taste.  Nottingham does it for sure, as far as my tastes go.  Not everyone gets that flavor though.

26
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 14, 2017, 08:28:50 AM »
I think that the bypass will depend on the model of the A/C.  When I researched this a few years ago, I found it simpler just to trick the internal A/C temp controller by heating it, rather than bypassing the controls electronically.  So, basically, I can't help.  Sorry!

Mine works functionally as you desire, it's just not as elegant.  But it's also easily reversible, which was nice when I went to larger A/C.
This is the basic idea on how the coolbot functions but it also has some protections built in to prevent freezing.

My Rube Goldberg approach was to put the whole gig on a timer to give any potential freeze up time to defrost.

27
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 14, 2017, 08:05:07 AM »
I think that the bypass will depend on the model of the A/C.  When I researched this a few years ago, I found it simpler just to trick the internal A/C temp controller by heating it, rather than bypassing the controls electronically.  So, basically, I can't help.  Sorry!

Mine works functionally as you desire, it's just not as elegant.  But it's also easily reversible, which was nice when I went to larger A/C.

28
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 13, 2017, 01:24:59 PM »
For my cool room, I pulled the temperature sensor out through the front of the A/C and have it fed into an insulated can that has a night light inside of it as a heat source.  This makes the A/C believe it is always warm in the room.  The insulated can and the Johnson controller run on a timer so that the A/C shuts down every two hours at a minimum (concerned about freezing the coil).

I can maintain summertime temps into the 40s, though I rarely take it below 60 these days.  It's really more for wine, but also works as a large fermentation chamber.

The only significant cost was the Johnson controller.  If I did it again, I'd use an inkbird or an STC-1000 (same basic thing, but C readout).

29
I had a batch stall recently, but at 1.040.  I pulled a sample and pitched a pack of bread yeast into the sample.  It definitely took off fermenting.

I had already raised the temp on the fermenter and after about a week of elevated (75+) temps the fermentation had restarted (new krausen) and the beer came down to 1.012.

I would definitely test the fermentability of the wort with some bread yeast.  It may be done, but my high gravity beers typical finish in the teens.

30
I've never even heard of the IL or WI breweries. But at least I now know where Alabama is. Public school kid, donchaknow.

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