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Messages - Joe Sr.

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1546
All Grain Brewing / Re: Greetings from Uganda, and question
« on: December 05, 2014, 01:53:12 PM »
I'd skip the biscuit/aromatic malt altogether. 

But that's just me.

I thought about that as well but with plain 2 row a bit of more characterful base type malt can make a huge difference in a relatively small malt forward beer like this.

Do you think you could gain enough character from a longer boil?  Or pulling some and reducing it a la Skotrat's Traquair House Ale?  I think I'd almost rather give that a try.

As far as yeast, I'm not familiar with Mangrove Jack but I've not heard anything very good.  Nottingham is solid, if not one I particularly care for.

1547
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Used kegs
« on: December 05, 2014, 01:49:18 PM »
AIH Black Friday Sale.  Over and done, but they were $69 each.  New.

1548
All Grain Brewing / Re: Greetings from Uganda, and question
« on: December 05, 2014, 01:15:17 PM »
I'd skip the biscuit/aromatic malt altogether. 

But that's just me.


1549
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Used kegs
« on: December 05, 2014, 01:05:09 PM »
NB or someone (AIH, perhaps?) had new kegs for $70 earlier this week.

I don't need more kegs, but that's a good price.

1550
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Separating Trub from Yeast Slurry
« on: December 05, 2014, 08:20:28 AM »
I use a very specific procedure of picking up the fermentor and moving it in an orbital fashion until the remaining beer has swirled up the yeast cake into the liquid, then I pour it into a sanatized half gallon mason jar.
Amazingly, I seem to have come to the same solution as well. Except I pour it into multiple pint mason jars. I now have a shelf in my fridge of yeast pickled under beer :)

Is that extraction process patented?  Because I've been using it, too, for years.

The only difference is I pour my yeast into tupperware containers.  I find that pressure will usually build up in the container and I prefer bulged tupperware to broken glass.

I store the yeast like this for extended periods of time and use it to create starters for brew day.

1551
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Commercial Bottle w/o Cap Came Out Super Sour
« on: December 04, 2014, 12:39:02 PM »
You're bolder than I.  For sure.

I keep thinking "urine."

1552
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Commercial Bottle w/o Cap Came Out Super Sour
« on: December 04, 2014, 10:40:41 AM »
Ew.  That cap came off somewhere along the line.  who knows what you drank.

1553
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Danstar Windsor
« on: December 04, 2014, 10:39:02 AM »
Of the two, I prefer Windsor.  I get weird tart flavors from Notty and don't plan to use it again, though I have some in my emergency dry yeast stash.

That said I've made outstanding beer with the combination of Windsor and Notty.  These beers did not exhibit the odd tartness.  Take that for whatever it is worth.

1554
Kegging and Bottling / Re: volumes of CO2 when bottling
« on: December 04, 2014, 10:33:46 AM »
You can get unrefined cane sugar that has a brown tint to it.  Sugar in the Raw is unrefined cane sugar.

IME, the falvor difference are subtle if you're using a lb or so in a beer.  I don't think the amount used for priming will have an impact.

As far as fermentability, they are or should be identical.

1555
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottle cleaning
« on: December 04, 2014, 10:27:59 AM »
Good advice here.  If it needs a brush, I'll throw it out.  But I've found most everything will come clean with an oxy clean soak and a bottle washer.

1556
Equipment and Software / Re: Tap-A-Draft
« on: December 03, 2014, 02:07:07 PM »
You don't have to "constantly" add pressure, but every time you pour a pint you will lose pressure.

Most people leave their kegs hooked up at serving pressure.  Some of us pour off of head pressure and top up the CO2 when the pressure gets low.

I don't pour too many pints at once, so I go with head pressure.  The keg will equalize over time, which means the beer will get less carbonated unless you hit it with more pressure.

EDIT:  You probably recognize this, but you pay for the convenience of not having to refill CO2.  I get a 5 - 15lb tank filled for $20.  The small cartridges are maybe as low as $0.50 if you buy them in bulk.

1557
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Stupid liquid out post! Uuuugh!
« on: December 03, 2014, 11:53:03 AM »
I stripped down my first batch of kegs and cleaned them all at once.  Fun times putting the posts back on.  Some kegs were Cornelius. Some were Spartanburg.  I had no idea that the gas and liquid were different posts nor that different kegs had different posts.  But I learned quickly.

1558
Beer Recipes / Re: ferment for 12 weeks
« on: December 03, 2014, 07:37:03 AM »
I think that's just lightening fast updating on the website.

1559
Equipment and Software / Re: Tap-A-Draft
« on: December 02, 2014, 04:00:39 PM »
Yes, you're better off with a small keg but the investment is more.

If you don't like kegging the kegs hold their value (as well as beer).  I'm not sure if there's a market for a used tap-a-draft.

I started off using mini-kegs.  Still use them occasionally, but not so much.  They work, but they're not the best.

1560
Beer Recipes / Re: ferment for 12 weeks
« on: December 02, 2014, 03:52:32 PM »
Seems like a typo to me. 12 days?

It's not in the list on http://www.experimentalbrew.com/errata, that's why I'm asking. :)

Ummm.  Unless they added it since you posted it is listed.

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