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Messages - Joe Sr.

Pages: 1 ... 132 133 [134] 135 136 ... 167
1996
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Mini-regulator - DIY?
« on: February 06, 2012, 05:39:31 PM »
Very cool. Thank you. I'm not worried about pretty.

1997
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Mini-regulator - DIY?
« on: February 06, 2012, 03:40:18 PM »
This is a lot cheaper.  I'm sure you could modify it with a gauge and call it good.
http://morebeer.com/view_product/18301//CO2_Injector_Ball_Lock

Right.  That's basically what I have.

I'm trying to suss out ideas for adding a regulator and gauge.

I use mine on mini-kegs and without a regulator you can pop them out into little 5L metal footballs.

1998
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Mini-regulator - DIY?
« on: February 06, 2012, 03:38:33 PM »
I know I'd seen an article in BYO or Zymurgy where someone built one for cheap. Maybe in the last couple of months.  When I have a few minutes I'll see if I can locate the article

That would be awesome.  If it's BYO it will be more fuel to my lingering thought of re-starting my subscription.

1999
Kegging and Bottling / Mini-regulator - DIY?
« on: February 06, 2012, 02:20:56 PM »
This looks awesome to me: http://www.williamsbrewing.com/MINI-BALL-LOCK-C02-REGULATOR-P2072C148.aspx

However, the price is a bit steep.

Anyone built something similar?

I'm thinking you could use this: http://www.mcmaster.com/#air-compressor-regulators/=g4utef with a schraeder valve for an inlet and a barbed fitting for an outlet.  That would let you use one of those CO2 injectors that take cartridges.  I use one that I got at a bike store (which will fit the schraeder valve) but my biggest complaint is that you can't control the pressure.

Any thoughts?

2000
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Bourbon 'Barrel' Stout question
« on: February 02, 2012, 09:18:04 AM »
I think 16 oz. would be a lot of bourbon in a five gallon batch.

I've used American oak chips and I soak them in bourbon in an 8 oz. Ball jar.  I think you get about 2 oz. or so of chips in the small jar.  I haven't measured out the bourbon, but less than 8 oz.

You can get 4 oz of chips in a pint jar, but in my experience that seems like it might be too much.

I just did an 8 oz. jar into a split batch, so it was 2.5 gallons.  The oak is very present compared to when I've done it into a 5 gallon batch.


2001
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Your favorite glass
« on: January 31, 2012, 07:21:43 PM »
Who needs a glass when you have picnic taps?

I have too many glasses to have a favorite.  Whatever is full.

2002
Other Fermentables / Re: Gonna do my first cider Saturday.
« on: January 31, 2012, 04:07:25 PM »
I've read that cranberry juice will take the ink off bottles that are screened.

I have no experience with this, but that's what I've seen elsewhere.

2003
Other Fermentables / Re: Gonna do my first cider Saturday.
« on: January 31, 2012, 10:49:07 AM »
I've bottled my kegged ciders into regular old beer bottles.  Since you're not building carbonation, I don't think it matters.

Champagne bottles would not be necessary.

2004
Other Fermentables / Re: Gonna do my first cider Saturday.
« on: January 30, 2012, 07:33:22 PM »
I think campden tablets will kill the yeast for you.  Then you can back sweeten.

But I've not done this, so wait for more authoritative advice.

2005
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Hansen keg valve question
« on: January 30, 2012, 01:28:52 PM »
Cool.  Let us know how they work out.

Since you're just getting back into it, you might not know but keg prices have shot up wildly in the last year or so.

18 - 24 months ago I could get them locally for $30 - $35.  Now they're $65+ when you can find them (ball lock).

Pin lock kegs aren't as scarce, but they're worth hanging on to and fixing rather than tossing them.

2006
"He noted homebrewers aren't subject to the same health and safety inspection requirements as commercial brewers"

By extension of this logic, cooking meals at home should be banned as well.

2007
I find that the yeast will also cling to the sides of the carboy while it clears.

So you might have perfectly clear beer, but you have a murky carboy.

This is nothing to be concerned about.

Leave it in secondary as long as you feel comfortable with it.  Or package it now.

A BDS at 9.1% should age well, but it can also age in kegs or bottles.

2008
All Grain Brewing / Re: Can sunlight affect wort?
« on: January 30, 2012, 10:24:50 AM »
Denny - I've heard similar things before, but I also read an article about a study on this that seemed to say it needed significant exposure for detectable levels of "skunking."

I'll look for that article.  I can't recall where I read it, but it was interesting.  IIRC they did three tiers of exposure and were pretty methodical.

EDIT: There's too darn many post on-line for me to find that article ever again.  I guess if it tastes skunked to you, that's enough for me.




Yeah, it was very definitely skunked.  A very hoppy IPA and very bright direct sunlight.

I'm sort of embarrassed to admit it, but when I have beers outside I typically have them in a red Solo cup.  Racking leaves, painting windows, and what not.

Plus, I try to put them in the shade so they don't get warm.

Maybe that helps.

2009
Kegging and Bottling / Re: gelatin fining in keg
« on: January 30, 2012, 10:19:17 AM »
I don't think you want to boil it, just pasteurize it.  I heat my mixed solution to about 160 and add it to the cold beer in the keg.  It will clear in the time it takes for the hot liquid on top to reach the same temp as the cold beer and then settle to the bottom.  I usually get a glass of gummy stuff and then nice, clear beer.  I don't transfer to another keg unless I need to move it or take it to an event.

+1 This is pretty much what I do.  Works great. Beer is clear after about 8oz of sludgy stuff. BUT it seems like a ot of that sludge clings to the side/bottom of the keg, so be aware that whenever you move or disturb the keg you'll loosen some of it up and get another cloudy glass the next time you pour one.

This is why I'm thinking that after I fine it I might blow out the first pint and then jumper the keg to an empty and just transfer the whole batch.

I've got a beer on tap right now that I get sediment on the first pint every time I pour from it, and the keg is not getting moved.

2010
Kegging and Bottling / Re: gelatin fining in keg
« on: January 29, 2012, 07:19:46 PM »
So I've noticed everyone is using less than a full packet.

Are there negatives to using a full packet of gelatin?

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