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Messages - Joe Sr.

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2341
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 10, 2013, 07:44:46 AM »
Does the word decanting mean anything to anyone here?

How would you decant without introducing significant oxygen?

Pouring my carboy into the keg would be a lot faster, but I'm afraid it might be detrimental to the quality of the beer...

2342
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 09, 2013, 07:42:03 PM »
It is much easier to simply suck start the siphon.  I can usually use pressure, but sometimes I need to start it manually.

I had a girlfriend back in the day who could suck start a Harley (but only when the exhaust pipes were cold)  Does that count?

Give me her number. My battery is shot And she dont like to start.

 Pipes are about 15 degrees cold right now.

2343
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 09, 2013, 03:55:45 PM »
I'd rather have a long conversation about spelling conventions and the etymological roots of words than deal with a siphon.  I was mightily pleased with myself when I figured out I could start them with pressure, rather than fill and drain into a glass.

2344
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 09, 2013, 03:42:12 PM »
I hate starting siphons.

So Joe, tell us how you feel about starting syphons?

I'd rather watch episodes of My Little Pony. 

BTW, what's the convention on spelling?  Siphon?  Syphon?  With a Y it seems so much more epic, like Scylla or Sisyphus.  But I don't think I ever noticed anyone spell it with a Y before this thread...

2345
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 09, 2013, 02:51:39 PM »
I hate starting siphons.

2346
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 09, 2013, 01:30:59 PM »
I know a guy who would do that with an in-line micron filter stuck on a piece of tubing...

I recommend "rinsing" your mouth with vodka, or better yet bourbon to sterilize it.  At least once day regardless of whether or not you plan to siphon. 

2347
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: A minor conundrum
« on: December 09, 2013, 01:22:12 PM »
What kind of caps fit on the jugs?  Can you get a stopper with two drilled holes, or drill the cap?

I'd transfer under minimal pressure and eliminate as much loss as possible.  I've used an aquarium pump for this and have also done it with CO2 at about 2 - 5lbs pressure.

I hate starting siphons.

2348
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brrrrrrew Day
« on: December 09, 2013, 01:16:10 PM »
Can't you weave some palm fronds into a portable sunscreen while you lounge in paradise during the mash?  You could move this natural sun screen throughout the day to block the sun.

Maybe...  I'd have to figure out how to keep it from shading my solar HLT.

Nobody knows the trouble I've seen...

I'll shed a frozen tear for you as I chip the ice of my windshield this evening.

2349
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brrrrrrew Day
« on: December 09, 2013, 11:09:44 AM »
The sun is approaching the lowest point in the southern sky at this time of year.  My brew "shed" is open on three sides and the sun angles into the brewery for most of the day.  Sun burn is a serious consideration during a long brew day.  Long pants and long sleeves are not comfortable to wear while brewing here.  Does anyone have any non-greasy sunblock recommendations for brewing?

Can't you weave some palm fronds into a portable sunscreen while you lounge in paradise during the mash?  You could move this natural sun screen throughout the day to block the sun.

2350
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brrrrrrew Day
« on: December 09, 2013, 10:14:24 AM »
keep a CO detector around.

Definitely.  Cheap insurance.  CO build-up is not something you will notice.  You'll just sort of drift off.

If you have a way to rig up an exhaust, that would be ideal.  But I'd still keep a CO detector plugged in somewhere.

2351
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brrrrrrew Day
« on: December 09, 2013, 08:51:01 AM »
I knocked out 10 gallons in my kitchen with football on the TV and snow falling outside.

The family was out, so it was me time.  Bottled a bunch off the kegs, too.

One of these days, I'll put the valve on my new kettle, rig up a decent mash tun out of one of the many coolers I've collected for the purpose, and move my efforts outside.  This was not the weekend to do it, however.  Though I do keep saying that.

2352
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry Yeast for English Style Barleywine?
« on: December 09, 2013, 08:36:56 AM »
Another vote for Nottingham.

How do S-04 and Nottingham compare?

I've never used S-04, but I bought some recently with the intention of doing a comparison.

I don't get "bready" from Nottingham.  I do find it to have more esters than you might expect as it is usually described as a "neutral" fermenter.  Mostly, for me, that's been expressed as a tartness on the finish.  I'll get a similar tartness from some commerical English ales, but not as pronounced.

My hope is that I'll like S-04 and use it instead of Nottingham.  I've been disappointed with most of my lower gravity beers that used Nottingham but it seems to be a champ on the bigger beers.  And I don't get the tartness.  Maybe it ages out?

2353
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Poor efficiency/very soft water
« on: December 06, 2013, 09:06:31 PM »
What exactly are you trying to say???

You're obtuse or your trolling.  Read your last post in it's entirety, including the quotes.  I think it's quite clear.

You've also yet to offer anything constructive.

This has been fun.  Enjoy your weekend.  I'll join in for awhile next time.

2354
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Poor efficiency/very soft water
« on: December 06, 2013, 08:51:07 PM »
NNNNNNOOOOOO
No fermentable sugars, then what is the 30 +/- 5 %???????

You are familiar with long-chain unfermentable sugars, right?

From "How to Brew."

Chapter 20 - Experiment!
20.1 Increasing the Body

Very often brewers say that they like a beer but wish it had more body. What exactly is "more body"? Is it a physically heavier, more dense beer? More flavor? More viscosity? In most cases it means a higher final gravity (FG), but not at the expense of incomplete fermentation. On a basic level, adding unfermentables is the only way to increase the FG and increase the body/weight/mouthfeel of the beer. There are two types of unfermentables that can be added: unfermentable sugars and proteins.

Unfermentable sugars are highly caramelized sugars, like those in caramel malts, and long chain sugars referred to as dextrins. Dextrin malt and malto-dextrin powder have been previously mentioned in the ingredients chapters. Dextrins are tasteless carbohydrates that hang around, adding some weight and viscosity to the beer. The effect is fairly limited and some brewers suspect that dextrins are a leading cause of "beer farts," when these otherwise unfermentable carbohydrates are finally broken down in the intestines.

Dark caramel and roasted malts like Crystal 80, Crystal 120, Special B, Chocolate Malt, and Roast Barley have a high proportion of unfermentable sugars due to the high degree of caramelization (or charring). The total soluble extract (percent by weight) of these malts is close to that of base malt, but just because it's soluble does not mean it is fermentable. These sugars are only partially fermentable and contribute both a residual sweetness and higher FG to the finished beer. These types of sugars do not share dextrin's digestive problems and the added flavor and color make for a more interesting beer. The contribution of unfermentable sugars from enzymatic and caramel malts can be increased by mashing at a higher temperature (i.e. 158°F) where the beta amylase enzyme is deactivated. Without this enzyme, the alpha amylase can only produce large sugars (including dextrins) from the starches and the wort is not as fermentable. The result is a higher final gravity and more body.

Proteins are also unfermentable and are the main contributor to the mouthfeel of a beer. Compare an oatmeal stout to a regular stout and you will immediately notice the difference. There is a special term for these mouthfeel-enhancing proteins - "medium-sized proteins." During the protein rest, peptidase breaks large proteins into medium proteins and protease breaks medium proteins into small proteins. In a standard well-modified malt, a majority of the large proteins have already been broken down into medium and small proteins. A protein rest is not necessary for further protein breakdown, and in fact, would degrade the beer's mouthfeel. A protein rest to produce medium-sized proteins for increased body is only practical when brewing with moderately-modified malts, wheat, or oatmeal, which are loaded with large proteins.

To add more body to an extract-based beer, add more caramel malt or some malto-dextrin powder. You can also increase the total amount of fermentables in the recipe which will raise both the OG and FG, and give you a corresponding increase in alcohol too.

Grain brewers can add dextrin malt, caramel malt, unmalted barley or oatmeal in addition to using the methods above. Grain brewing lends more flexibility in fine tuning the wort than extract brewing.

2355
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Poor efficiency/very soft water
« on: December 06, 2013, 07:44:37 PM »
steeping temperature is irrelevant, 5 minutes in room temp water will easily allow for 80% plus extraction of the sugars with a decent crush(the muslin bag was my 50%).


Chapter 13 - Steeping Specialty Grains

13.2 Mechanics of Steeping
To use the caramel and roasted specialty malts, the grain must be crushed to expose the sugars to the water. While the grain is soaking, the hot water is leaching the sugars out of the grain and dissolving them into the wort. The factors that influence how well the sugars are extracted are the steeping time, temperature and the particle size. Obviously, the finer you crush the malt the more completely you can extract the sugars. However, most supply shops have their mills adjusted for mashing and lautering purposes and if the particle size where much smaller, it would be difficult to contain within the grainbag.

His process is sound, his thermometer failed him, even though he doesn't even need one.

I'm not sure what you're arguing.  Time and temp doesn't matter (according to Repo), except it does (reference Repo's quote from "How to Brew" a book I may have heard of).

Rather than attempt to create an argument how about some constructive advice? 

If his process is sound and steeping is as simple as running room temp water over grains (your contention), why is his gravity low?  Do you have advice for the OP?  Or do you prefer to argue with those of us who have attempted to give advice?

I stand by my previous statements.  The gravity he will get from steeping grains is not something to worry about.  He is not mashing, so worrying about the efficiency of his steep is worrying too much.  He will not extract significant fermentable sugars from steeping and that is not the point of steeping.  If he wants to mash, he should go ahead and do it but the grains he is steeping are not grains you mash.

Your turn.  Constructive this time.

"con·struc·tive
adjective \kən-ˈstrək-tiv\

: helping to develop or improve something : helpful to someone instead of upsetting and negative"

From the Merriam Webster dictionary.  A book you may have heard of.

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