Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Joe Sr.

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 276
46
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Clear beer??
« on: March 16, 2017, 09:47:18 AM »
If you are brewing all grain you will have to pay attention to your pH if you want clear beers. pH will give you a better cold break which will help with a beer's clearning. Also cooling rapidly can drastically help in the clarity. Irish moss or Whirlflock will help in clearning. Certain yeast are simply stubborn to clear, Chico (US-05/WY1056/WLP001) is one in particular. Gelatin or other fining agents will help dramatically. Biofine Clear is an excellent fining agent. But as mentioned, cold and time will clear all beers eventually.

Absolutely, without the oxidation added from the fining agents to boot!

Does chill haze drop with time?  I assume so.  But I guess I don't know for sure since I'm asking.

47
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 15, 2017, 03:02:08 PM »

For "weazletoe", the internal "t-stat" you mention, is that the cool-side temp. sensor?

Not sure what you mean by "cool side sensor". I'm just making an assumption that you have an a/c with with a mechanical dial like stat. There should be two power wire on it. One hot, going in, and one out that is hot when the stat calls for cooling. cut these two off the stat and nut the together. The A/C should run 24/7 when you do that.

Most of the newer A/Cs that I've encountered have digital controls and no longer have the mechanical dial.  I believe it becomes much more complicated to override the sensor on these.  Maybe not.  I don't recall for sure, but it was enough of a bear that I skipped it.

48
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Tangy Aftertaste
« on: March 15, 2017, 11:22:01 AM »
I don't know much about iron in water, but certain yeast strains can also give a tangy taste.  Nottingham does it for sure, as far as my tastes go.  Not everyone gets that flavor though.

49
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 14, 2017, 08:28:50 AM »
I think that the bypass will depend on the model of the A/C.  When I researched this a few years ago, I found it simpler just to trick the internal A/C temp controller by heating it, rather than bypassing the controls electronically.  So, basically, I can't help.  Sorry!

Mine works functionally as you desire, it's just not as elegant.  But it's also easily reversible, which was nice when I went to larger A/C.
This is the basic idea on how the coolbot functions but it also has some protections built in to prevent freezing.

My Rube Goldberg approach was to put the whole gig on a timer to give any potential freeze up time to defrost.

50
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 14, 2017, 08:05:07 AM »
I think that the bypass will depend on the model of the A/C.  When I researched this a few years ago, I found it simpler just to trick the internal A/C temp controller by heating it, rather than bypassing the controls electronically.  So, basically, I can't help.  Sorry!

Mine works functionally as you desire, it's just not as elegant.  But it's also easily reversible, which was nice when I went to larger A/C.

51
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Room AC control by-pass
« on: March 13, 2017, 01:24:59 PM »
For my cool room, I pulled the temperature sensor out through the front of the A/C and have it fed into an insulated can that has a night light inside of it as a heat source.  This makes the A/C believe it is always warm in the room.  The insulated can and the Johnson controller run on a timer so that the A/C shuts down every two hours at a minimum (concerned about freezing the coil).

I can maintain summertime temps into the 40s, though I rarely take it below 60 these days.  It's really more for wine, but also works as a large fermentation chamber.

The only significant cost was the Johnson controller.  If I did it again, I'd use an inkbird or an STC-1000 (same basic thing, but C readout).

52
I had a batch stall recently, but at 1.040.  I pulled a sample and pitched a pack of bread yeast into the sample.  It definitely took off fermenting.

I had already raised the temp on the fermenter and after about a week of elevated (75+) temps the fermentation had restarted (new krausen) and the beer came down to 1.012.

I would definitely test the fermentability of the wort with some bread yeast.  It may be done, but my high gravity beers typical finish in the teens.

53
I've never even heard of the IL or WI breweries. But at least I now know where Alabama is. Public school kid, donchaknow.

54
All Grain Brewing / Re: Is a 90 Min boil needed?
« on: March 09, 2017, 07:03:09 PM »
On the other hand, for styles that benefit from oxidation (I'm sold on low O2 brewing, I just don't believe it's appropriate for every style) a 90 minute boil might help...Doesn't Toby use an extended boil for his Scotch Ale? It'd certainly explain why I've seemed to have better luck with longer boils with British styles. (Real ale must be slightly oxidized almost by definition.)
Yes. Toby does a long boil for his wee heavy.  I was impressed with the results and just recently did a 90 minute boil for my old ale (which admittedly is not necessarily to bjcp style guidelines).

55
It occurs to me that you don't really need a four inch hole for the draft lines to go into the tower.  You should be able to have a substantially smaller hole which minimizes the concern of cracking.

For my back yard bar, I think I drilled a 2.5" hole for the draft lines.  Of course, I'm only pulling one line through, but even if you have four taps, you shouldn't need a four inch hole.

56
Someone MUST have done this before.

I was recently at a bar with my wife where the tap tower had an integral drip tray.  You could see in the granite where they had cut out for the tray and tower and had to patch it back in and re-cut.  I assume they put a plywood backing underneath.

57
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Top 3 - Bottom 3
« on: March 06, 2017, 06:41:04 PM »
I bought them from Williams or Northern Brewer or some place. They all ought to have them. Any all metal flare fitting is useless without them.

58
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Top 3 - Bottom 3
« on: March 06, 2017, 03:24:41 PM »
Kegco 1/4" MFL to sankey adapters - Little metal adapters that let you use commercial taps on hoses fitted with 1/4" MFL fitting for homebrew taps. Utter waste of money, they will not seal at all. I've lost several bottles of CO2 to these lousy things. I've found a way to make them work, but they're still a pain. I'm afraid of snapping them off, I have to torque the fitting on them so tightly.

Have you used them with a 1/4 inch nylon flare washer?  You'll never got them to seal without it.  I don't know if I have Kegco brand adapters, but mine work great as long as there's a flare washer in the mix.

59
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bread Yeast for FFT?
« on: March 05, 2017, 05:08:26 PM »
Just a follow up.  The beer is down to 1.012 which is below where the FFT went, but I didn't really let it ferment out.  As I said above, I was just looking to be sure there wasn't some other problem.

Hoping to keg it later this week.

60
The Pub / Re: How did you pick your forum name?
« on: March 05, 2017, 05:04:23 PM »
It's my name.

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 ... 276